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> BHAGAVAD GITA
Shawn
post Sep 27, 2003, 10:11 AM
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the Bhagavad Gita is, without question, one of the seminal and most profound philosophical/spiritual works in human history. Let this thread be for the discussion of the Bhagavad Gita and it's myriad translations and interpretations.

What does the Gita mean to you?


Sri Aurobindo's translation of the gita can be found at http://intyoga.freeservers.com/bg_idx.htm . I don't agree fully with his translation, and think Stephen Mitchell's translation is superior (which unfortunately, is not available on the net). Nonetheless, I think Sri Aurobindo's translation is definitely worth reading, and I think it provides subtle clues into his manner of thinking, into his world-view, and into his possible states of mind.
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Joesus
post Sep 27, 2003, 10:26 AM
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I personally like the translation of the Bhagavad Ghita that was written by Maharishi Mahesh Yogi. The commentaries are written in relationship to the mechanical process of conscious evolution as translated from Krisna's conversation with Arjuna.
Even though he plugs Transcendental Meditation, the mechanical process of turning the mind inward is the same as with all vedic traditions.
The conversations with God or the Self are the beginning process of communication with the Self. The reaching towards and the meeting halfway of God and Man to reach union and Self Realization.
MSI's translation of the Yoga sutra's of Patanjali is another recommended read if you would like to understand the identifiable steps of conscious progression, from the awareness of the absolute to the minds acceptance and the hearts expansion after mental cognition and finally Union.
Although neither book contains the actual tools for the process. They remain in the hands of the Teacher who guides one through the process with the proper training and useful boundaries that are coupled with self discipline and the recognition of the Teachers experience.
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Shawn
post Sep 27, 2003, 12:24 PM
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it's important to point out, though, that the Gita, while being a testament to the greatness of human thought and spirituality, represent but a stepping stone unto higher Truths. And so it is, that with Einstein, I must concur that "All of mankind's thoughts have hitherto been but an insignificant reflection". We should not sell ourselves short. All that has been written and experienced by Man are but a glimpse of Truth, and are but the beginnings of wisdom. We are on the threshold of much greater things. It is up to us, here and now, to realize these greater Truths. This is our responsibility. We should not settle for anything less. And we should not sell ourselves, or our vast potentials, or our highest ideals, short.
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v3d4
post Sep 27, 2003, 12:53 PM
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chapter 12
6-7. But those who giving up all their actions to Me, and wholly devoted to Me, worship meditating on Me with an unswerving Yoga, those who fix on Me all their consciousness, O Partha, speedily I deliver them out of the sea of death-bound existence.
8. On Me repose all thy mind and lodge all thy understanding in Me; doubt not that thou shalt dwell in Me above this mortal existence.
9. And if thou art not able to keep the consciousness fixed steadily in Me, then by the Yoga of practice seek after Me, O Dhananjaya.

10. If thou art unable even to seek by practice, then be it thy supreme aim to do My work; doing all actions for My sake, thou shalt attain perfection.
10.If thou hast no ability even for practice,
Be wholly devoted to work for Me;
For My sake also actions
Preforming, thou shalt win perfection.
(trans by Frank Edgerton)


11. But if even this constant remembering of Me and lifting up of your works to Me is felt beyond your power, then renounce all fruit of action with the self controlled.
12. Better indeed is knowledge than practice, than knowledge, meditation is better; than meditation, renunciation of the fruit of action,
on renunciation follows peace.

im going for number 10
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supani123
post Sep 01, 2005, 04:13 PM
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i really like you all who with a whole and holy heart mostly appreciated the contention " of bhagawad geetha"

it is originally written in sanskrit and well commented by various critiques in all indian languages as well in english.
people even now gather in hundreds to hear the discourses on the geetha. it is a song celestial. "swamy chinmayananda" used to give dicourses commenting on the slokas of the heetha. neverthless as mentionrd by many arabindo's translation in addition to that of viniba bhave[known for his land donation movement] added beauty the version.
every indian well versed in slokas[stanzas] will quote for himself or to uthers in course of delight or despair.
it is a path of life described in the holy book
i note to search for stephen mitchells translation. you can mend and amend your age old ways and views to suit the human taste
once you are in.
more to web
supani
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anadi
post Mar 12, 2009, 05:47 AM
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I also read Bhagavad-gita in different translation of different yoga-schools.

I had to admit that all the translation and the commentaries were more or less out of the context of Maha-Bharat.
Sri Krishna spoke that “Bhagavad-gita” to persuade Arjuna to fight.
All of the translators don’t want to be aware that this was the purpose of the “Speech of the Lord” – Bhagavad-gita, namely to persuade Arjuna to fight, against his own will.
Of course this was a good luck for us, because we were given the opportunity to understand the different level of instructions the Lord may give one in distress.
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anadi
post Mar 12, 2009, 05:57 AM
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Arjuna was confused. He didn't know what he has to do.

One on side his dharma (occupational duty and his moral) as a warrior, was, regardless of circumstances,
to fight, but as he steped out between the two armies, he saw on the opposite side his relatives, teachers, and other highly esteemed personalities.


Arjuna said: My dear Kṛṣṇa, seeing my friends and relatives present before me in such a fighting spirit, I feel the limbs of my body quivering and my mouth drying up.

My whole body is trembling, my hair is standing on end, my bow Gāṇḍīva is slipping from my hand, and my skin is burning.

I do not see how any good can come from killing my own kinsmen in this battle,
nor can I, my dear Kṛṣṇa, desire any subsequent victory, kingdom, or happiness.

O Govinda, of what avail to us are a kingdom, happiness or even life itself
when all those for whom we may desire them are now arrayed on this battlefield?

O Madhusūdana, when teachers, fathers, sons, grandfathers, maternal uncles,
fathers-in-law, grandsons, brothers-in-law and other relatives are ready to give up their lives and properties
and are standing before me, why should I wish to kill them, even though they might otherwise kill me?

O maintainer of all living entities, I am not prepared to fight with them even in exchange for the three worlds,
let alone this earth. What pleasure will we derive from killing the sons of Dhṛtarāṣṭra?

Sin will overcome us if we slay such aggressors. Therefore it is not proper for us to kill the sons of Dhṛtarāṣṭra and our friends.

What should we gain, O Kṛṣṇa, husband of the goddess of fortune, and how could we be happy by killing our own kinsmen?

O Janārdana, although these men, their hearts overtaken by greed, see no fault in killing one's family or quarreling with friends,
why should we, who can see the crime in destroying a family, engage in these acts of sin?

With the destruction of dynasty, the eternal family tradition is vanquished, and thus the rest of the family becomes involved in false dharma (false moral or duty).

When adharma (false moral and duty) is prominent in the family, O Kṛṣṇa, the women of the family become polluted,
and from the degradation of womanhood, O descendant of Vṛṣṇi, comes unwanted progeny.

An increase of unwanted population certainly causes hellish life both for the family and for those who destroy the family tradition.

The ancestors of such corrupt families fall down, because the performances for offering them food and water are entirely stopped.

By the evil deeds of those who destroy the family tradition and thus give rise to unwanted children,
all kinds of community projects and family welfare activities are devastated

Better for me if the sons of Dhṛtarāṣṭra, weapons in hand, were to kill me unarmed and unresisting on the battlefield.


Sañjaya (the secretary of the blind Dhritarashtra, who was recounting in yogic trance the activities on the battle field of Kurukshetra) said:

Arjuna, having thus spoken on the battlefield, cast aside his bow and arrows and sat down on the chariot, his mind overwhelmed with grief.
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anadi
post Mar 13, 2009, 01:19 AM
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For our understanding Krishna’s first reply seem quite curious, as He says:

“How have these impurities come upon you?
They are not at all befitting a man who knows the value of life.
They lead not to higher planets but to infamy.”


But He explains the meaning of His words,
by starting an explanation of the nature of one's duty as the highest moral pertaining one's activities in this mortal world.


(The idea is that the ocupationl duty (dharma) of a warrior is to fight regardless of circumstances, according the rules of combat.)

And in this connection Krishna adds:

O son of Pṛthā, do not yield to this degrading impotence.
It does not become of you. Give up such petty weakness of heart and arise, O chastiser of the enemy.

But Arjuna doesn’t let loose; he says to Krishna:

O killer of enemies, O killer of Madhu, how can I counterattack with arrows in battle men like Bhīṣma and Droṇa, who are worthy of my worship?

It would be better to live in this world by begging than to live at the cost of the lives of great souls who are my teachers.

Even though desiring worldly gain, they are superiors. If they are killed, everything we enjoy will be tainted with blood.

Nor do we know which is better — conquering them or being conquered by them.

If we killed the sons of Dhṛtarāṣṭra, we should not care to live. Yet they are now standing before us on the battlefield.

I can find no means to drive away this grief which is drying up my senses.

I will not be able to dispel it even if I win a prosperous, unrivalled kingdom on earth with sovereignty like the demigods in heaven.

Govinda, I shall not fight.

As Arjuna presented again his concerns regarding one’s general duty in relation to one’s seniors, teachers and relatives,
Krishna decided to disconnect him from the battle field
and talk to him about the real nature of the material world and the true nature of the soul,
and so He decides to speak about the nitya dharma – the eternal occupational duty,
not naimitik dharma – the occasional occupational duty, which may be well concerned with material occasional denominations,
related to one’s particular life, one is “living in”.
In one life one may have some relatives and teachers and in another life one may have others.
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