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> Concepts, question to readers
Liamk
post Dec 09, 2015, 01:25 PM
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Can anyone let me know if the following is generally understood?

An object concept is the combination of shapes, colours and other qualities of an object, and each quality is individually registered in the brain. The registries activate and connect in Hebbian fashion when they are first all seen together in the real object. They can then all be recalled by activating only some of the qualities, for example when the object is partly hidden or when reminded by something else that has similar qualities.

















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haohao
post Apr 07, 2016, 12:33 AM
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I think it's reasonable in some way, such as the brain activing phenomenon mentioned above for the object or matter identifying or recognization, but actually it's multi-levled storaging with perhaps a constructed information processing, including the info image-like compression. Also, I remembered there was a post years ago by a cyber name called MVT which deals briefly with the fast brain reconization mechanism.

I think the neruo transmission may deeply involved in this brain activing activity, and different proteins and other cells maybe the associated parts of it.
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