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> Remorse for murder?
ProvingRaeWrong
post Feb 24, 2014, 02:50 PM
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Hello, I was told by someone the other day that our brains are hardwired to feel remorse for murder no matter what. I am curious if this is true? My arguments were executioners of death row inmates, does the doctor feel remorse for giving the shot? Do all 5 gunmen feel remorse for murder when only 1 is actually guilty? Does the hangman feel remorse for dropping the floor? What about an abuse victim who years later kills their abuser? Those were my arguments and I was told that we as humans are hardwired to feel remorse and there is no way nobody does not feel remorse for murder. I was told this was not a societal situation but a neurological one. Please help me prove this woman wrong.
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growabrainstem
post Mar 23, 2014, 04:33 PM
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QUOTE(ProvingRaeWrong @ Feb 24, 2014, 03:50 PM) *

Hello, I was told by someone the other day that our brains are hardwired to feel remorse for murder no matter what. I am curious if this is true? My arguments were executioners of death row inmates, does the doctor feel remorse for giving the shot? Do all 5 gunmen feel remorse for murder when only 1 is actually guilty? Does the hangman feel remorse for dropping the floor? What about an abuse victim who years later kills their abuser? Those were my arguments and I was told that we as humans are hardwired to feel remorse and there is no way nobody does not feel remorse for murder. I was told this was not a societal situation but a neurological one. Please help me prove this woman wrong.

There is no trait that applies to 100% of humankind, though there are norms. Few abuse vics kill their perps, and frankly, kiling would make them perpetrators. It has been suggested that 10% of people have sociopathic personalities, but I think that might have been just one author that said that.
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TheNeurd
post Apr 19, 2014, 10:30 PM
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While our brains are hardwired to do many things remorse is not one of them. The way our brain is shaped over time depends a lot on the surrounding environment. Typically people are raised in an environment where doing good for others is rewarded and doing bad is punished. In some places people are raised with different morals and different ideas about how life works. If from birth someone is rewarded for hurting others and is repeatedly commended for their acts most likely they will not feel remorse for their actions. Over time if you're brain adapts to murdering others and neurons associated with murder are also associated with reward these types of people may not feel any sort of remorse. One argument you could also make to this woman is that they are now finding Neuro imaging studies where some psychopathic killers had brain damage in their orbital temporal as as lowered serotonin activIty. People with damage to this region of their brain have blunted fear processing and So they cannot understand when someone else is in pain. So if a person with this kind of problem were to murder someone they would not feel remorse for their actions considering they don't understand the pain of others. I know this want well written but I hope you can use something i said to shove it in this ladies face haha
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stephenrobin
post Oct 31, 2014, 01:32 AM
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And if so, how does the introduction of a time constant or leaky integrator achieve this? (I'm not sure mathematically how this gives us temporal information
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AstroLad02
post Oct 31, 2014, 04:05 AM
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That's like saying we're all hard-wired to perceive colours in the same way. Who's to say? So, it would be the conditioned response to that causes an individual to feel and therefore think in a particular manner.

This can otherwise be demonstrated through Pavlov's dog.
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zerocc1990
post Jun 11, 2015, 06:29 PM
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And if so, how does the introduction of a time constant or leaky integrator achieve this?



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Tom Nambi
post Jun 03, 2016, 01:41 AM
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Oh
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