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> Fitter Bodies = Fitter Brains
sharpbrains
post Oct 08, 2010, 03:22 AM
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The results of recently pub­lished stud­ies sug­gest that fit­ter chil­dren also have fit­ter brains. It looks like exer­cis­ing your body pro­motes brain health.

Is this true at all ages? How does it work?
How much exer­cise should we do?

What do you think of this research findings.

Fernando
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chrono
post Oct 12, 2010, 06:49 PM
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Providing links or abstracts for these studies would make it a lot easier to discuss them.
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Hey Hey
post Oct 13, 2010, 05:57 AM
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A neuroimaging investigation of the association between aerobic fitness, hippocampal volume, and memory performance in preadolescent children.

Brain Research, Volume 1358, 28 October 2010, Pages 172-183

Laura Chaddock, Kirk I. Erickson, Ruchika Shaurya Prakash, Jennifer S. Kim, Michelle W. Voss, Matt VanPatter, Matthew B. Pontifex, Lauren B. Raine, Alex Konkel, Charles H. Hillman, Neal J. Cohen, Arthur F. Kramer
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Christsean
post Feb 01, 2011, 09:39 AM
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I've read that walking 30 minutes per day can delay dementia. I'm sure it cannot hurt. I have added a link that has several references.

Walking Away Dementia
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astroidea
post Feb 26, 2011, 04:51 AM
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I hereby refer you to Mr. Foreman as your cognitive trainer.


RIP
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Guest
post Feb 26, 2011, 01:46 PM
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Absolutely exercise improves cognition. Nootropics aim to increase blood flow, but what better way than exercise? As far as memory consolidation is concerned, it is a great practice to exercise 15 min before and after learning.

More important in my opinion than exercise alone, is getting rid of visceral fat. Little known fact, adipose tissue is a huge part of your immune system, and excess visceral fat leads to chronic low grade inflammation, which results in typical western diseases including Alzheimer's dementia. Kinda interesting that sheets of beta amyloid also form in the pancreas in diabetics.
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orangesand
post May 23, 2011, 09:24 AM
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In our past people "exercised" because they had to(building/hunting/gathering/migrating/farming/.
It not that modern biking or playing soccer is good for your brain per se(it is), though its that our brains have until very recently lived with a body that laboured all day, which makes you healthy, the abstinence of manual labour is rather bad on the body/brain.
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XR500Final
post May 27, 2011, 05:20 AM
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Are you people serious? This question is elemental. Of course exercise is going to increase brain function - , more oxygen, and nutrients can get to the brain when the pump is running harder (your heart). The offset factor is that the brain is a total glucose glutton - consisting of only 2% of the weight of the body but in some cases consuming 35% of the available glucose. So it will be competing with the muscles for the available glucose energy.

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orangesand
post May 30, 2011, 08:20 AM
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QUOTE(XR500Final @ May 27, 2011, 09:20 AM) *

Are you people serious? This question is elemental. Of course exercise is going to increase brain function - , more oxygen, and nutrients can get to the brain when the pump is running harder (your heart). The offset factor is that the brain is a total glucose glutton - consisting of only 2% of the weight of the body but in some cases consuming 35% of the available glucose. So it will be competing with the muscles for the available glucose energy.


What are you saying actually? The brain uses certain resources because of the huge demands that are placed upon it in regulation of the CNS and periphery.
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orangesand
post May 30, 2011, 08:22 AM
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If the brain does not get the resources it needs, things turn sour.
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Flex
post May 31, 2011, 02:09 PM
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The real benefit is probably from increasing the poise of NADPH to NADP. Little known fact to the average man, NADPH can be considered a cardinal antioxidant. Search endogenous antioxidant on google, and you will not see this listed smile.gif

NADPH "recycles" glutathione, which, given the role of mitochondria in neural plasticity, and the high concentration of polyunsaturated fatty acids in neurons, probably plays a key role in cognitive health.

On the flip side, over eating causes one to store (synthesize) fatty acids, which uses significant amounts of NADPH--far more than is produced by burning fat.
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orangesand
post Jun 01, 2011, 12:48 AM
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QUOTE(XR500Final @ May 27, 2011, 09:20 AM) *

Are you people serious? This question is elemental. Of course exercise is going to increase brain function - , more oxygen, and nutrients can get to the brain when the pump is running harder (your heart). The offset factor is that the brain is a total glucose glutton - consisting of only 2% of the weight of the body but in some cases consuming 35% of the available glucose. So it will be competing with the muscles for the available glucose energy.


The body naturally regulates these energy cycles/shifts, its has had a lot of practice.
The brain needs it energy. Stored nutrients in the body are used to aid in recovery,
muscles are broken down during exercise and repaire strengthens the body.
The body is vastly more properly regulated when exercising than when never exercising.
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Flex
post Jun 01, 2011, 10:12 AM
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I personally believe that exercise induces expression of endogenous antioxidate enzymes. As far as the brain is concerned, there is substantial evidence to support the notion. The ratio of Q10 expressed in the brains of those who exercise is significantly higher. Typically Q9 is used in the electron transport chain (Q9 also increases) but Q10 is more likely a better antioxidant candidate.
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