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> Permanent Euphoria?
reich42
post Jul 28, 2010, 07:31 AM
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Can it be done? Could there be a way to maintain a euphoric, lucid, ecstatic, transcendent, happy state of mind? To me, this would be the most impressive human discovery of all time. I'm not talking about just being very happy, I'm talking about the best experience you have had on a psychedelic high or whatever got you to the point where you wanted it to last forever but it won't. Everything out now is temporary. If you could do LSD, Ecstasy, Shrooms, DMT, whatever...every single day this would be what I am talking about. But what if you could take something once and it would last weeks, months, even longer perhaps? And to those that don't believe this state of mind is possible to have for longer than a week without reverting back to normal, that's not true. I had a DXM-induced euphoric experience that lasted 2 weeks before I felt normal again. My other topic on nootropics talks all about what happened to me. I had reached a state of pure happiness that seemed to reach my brain's maximum potential to produce happiness. I don't believe it could have felt any better. I felt perfect in every way. Now I just take Piracetam, CDP Choline, ALCAR, Aniracetam and nothing big has happened, but I do notice the effects are similar to the experience I had. I just wish I could maintain that feeling for an unlimited amount of time. Too bad good drugs have to be so temporary. Or are they all?
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paperdragons
post Aug 15, 2010, 07:29 PM
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So, I don't know if this is a fitting reply or not. I think your body will develop tolerance to any drug, so I think permanent happiness would have to be effected by the endocrine system.

Now, I did have... not precisely a fast, but a period of considerably reduced caloric intake (>500/day) for a few months, and while I wouldn't call it pure euphoria, I didn't feel any negative emotions. It was... more like perpetual content. It seemed almost childlike to me. Like a rebirth of innocence.

And then, another experience... as I was coming out of my low caloric intake, I had some intense endocrine shifts. Quite a few, very intense. Anyway, in one of them, I did have a delusion or sensation that I could achieve perpetual bliss, and it kept going for a while. I was ecstatic, unintelligible, frenzied by my rapture. It probably isn't what you're looking for though, because it... it didn't exactly wear off. Time seemed to be going really slowly, in the sense of events and people around me moving, but I was also hyper-conscious of "time-itself" passing by continuously. Death felt almost immediate, and I was so greedy to preserve the perfect feeling of euphoria I had. And yet, paradoxically, this greed overwhelmed me. I couldn't handle everything. I couldn't "keep everything perfect." So I... I released the feeling... and I collapsed, and I laid panting on my bed.
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LizerLife
post Aug 18, 2010, 03:37 PM
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Your neurotransmitters/neuropeptides would deplete, and receptors would down regulate if you did drugs everyday.You could try Agonist or antipsychotics and Tryosine 2g-3g three times a day and/or 5HT 300mg-1g three times a day, depending on the drug your using.But I do not know what would happen if you did too much of the Agonist.
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thefield
post Sep 09, 2010, 10:11 AM
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this is the topic of a good deal of David Pearce's work on abolitionism, and its something I'm passionately thinking about these days. What the OP is referring to is something like amplifying the base level of human existence to gradients far and above what are present even at a person's most blissful moment. Even the lowest of emotional lows would be something akin to a climaxing orgasm or something similar induced from a psychedelic or entheogen/empathogen. There's a good deal of possible objections to doing such a thing, all covered on HEDWEB at www.superhappiness.com, but for here, we're just considering whether such a thing is possible--the epistemic possibility.

At its fundamental level, our perception and interaction of the world relies in part on balanced levels of certain opiates present in the brain. In theory, up-regulating these in some semi permanent and non-damaging way, seems like a good path forward. Of course, if technology catches up to current speculation, we can just change the genetic code somewhat to make a new baseline bliss the species norm.
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Rick
post Sep 09, 2010, 10:17 AM
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If everyone were always blissful, would we be motivated to change for improvement?
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Flex
post Sep 09, 2010, 11:54 AM
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If everyone were content, there would be no need for improvement. No drugs will make you happy. IMO synthetic happiness is not happiness. You have to earn happiness, and the only way I have found is to live your life deliberately and honestly. Most people know right and wrong, but choose to do wrong because it is easier (me included lol). That is why they are not happy. I believe if you actually live your life to your own highest standards and do not falter, you will achieve lasting happiness. That includes not taking drugs to achieve your goals--period.

***Don't get me wrong, drugs can be a useful tool to help you on the path to true happiness.
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Phi
post Sep 11, 2010, 07:46 AM
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uh, no; it wouldn't be euphoria anymore.
second: when one dies(since you did the dxm thing), what can be considered euphoric?
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Hey Hey
post Sep 11, 2010, 10:12 AM
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QUOTE(Phi @ Sep 11, 2010, 04:46 PM) *

uh, no; it wouldn't be euphoria anymore.
second: when one dies(since you did the dxm thing), what can be considered euphoric?
Death is so overrated. It's the dying that can make one feel so alive ... (aka only the living feel the pain of living and dying).
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Phi
post Sep 12, 2010, 06:45 PM
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QUOTE(Hey Hey @ Sep 11, 2010, 11:12 AM) *

QUOTE(Phi @ Sep 11, 2010, 04:46 PM) *

uh, no; it wouldn't be euphoria anymore.
second: when one dies(since you did the dxm thing), what can be considered euphoric?
Death is so overrated. It's the dying that can make one feel so alive ... (aka only the living feel the pain of living and dying).

Well I think there is a lot of reflection that goes on to show what's meaningful through the process of death. The easy highs are probably something that barely stick out in comparison to the natural high memories.
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cheekyleopard
post Sep 15, 2010, 08:17 AM
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Cutting out sucralose, aspartame, caffiene and drinking only mineral water gives me this feeling.
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Jakare
post Sep 15, 2010, 03:31 PM
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No one here has never ever enjoyed a melacholic autumīs evening?
You know, being alone at home. Its cold outside and your drinking a warm cup of tea. you are re-reading one of your old books while the sky starts to fade.
Life its good and you dont need to be euphoric to enjoy it.
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Hey Hey
post Sep 15, 2010, 09:05 PM
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QUOTE(Jakare @ Sep 16, 2010, 12:31 AM) *

No one here has never ever enjoyed a melacholic autumīs evening?
You know, being alone at home. Its cold outside and your drinking a warm cup of tea. you are re-reading one of your old books while the sky starts to fade.
Life its good and you dont need to be euphoric to enjoy it.
Too many new books to spend my limited time reading old ones. But I agree about the enlightenment through melancholia.
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Rick
post Sep 16, 2010, 09:51 AM
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Some say you have to get down to get up.
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Jakare
post Sep 17, 2010, 04:49 PM
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QUOTE(Hey Hey @ Sep 16, 2010, 07:05 AM) *

QUOTE(Jakare @ Sep 16, 2010, 12:31 AM) *

No one here has never ever enjoyed a melacholic autumīs evening?
You know, being alone at home. Its cold outside and your drinking a warm cup of tea. you are re-reading one of your old books while the sky starts to fade.
Life its good and you dont need to be euphoric to enjoy it.
Too many new books to spend my limited time reading old ones. But I agree about the enlightenment through melancholia.

As you get old you start having a new (and wiser?) point of view. That way old books become new again. Its interesting that sometimes you think, how could i enjoy that piece of crap? and in other ocassion it is like meeting a friend you havent seen for a long time.

As rick says the biggest depressions or crisis in life have had something important to teach even if it was something simple it was needed.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychological_resilience
http://psychology.about.com/od/crisiscouns.../resilience.htm
http://www.suite101.com/content/depressed-...for-you-a137228
[url=http://www.helium.com/items/1948984-how-our-addiction-to-happiness-can-make-us-unhappy]
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Trip like I do
post Sep 17, 2010, 07:20 PM
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QUOTE(reich42 @ Jul 28, 2010, 11:31 AM) *

permanent euphoria

.... fcuking eh'

.... but, are you some sorta closet nazi or something?
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Phi
post Sep 18, 2010, 09:33 AM
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nice
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Jim
post Nov 15, 2010, 09:59 AM
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QUOTE(Jakare @ Sep 15, 2010, 03:31 PM) *

No one here has never ever enjoyed a melacholic autumīs evening?
You know, being alone at home. Its cold outside and your drinking a warm cup of tea. you are re-reading one of your old books while the sky starts to fade.
Life its good and you dont need to be euphoric to enjoy it.


I agree. Always pushing for the "highs", and not taking the time to just enjoy "being", is what leads many to addictions and miserable lives. Anybody read the book Zorba the Greek?
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kikai93
post Dec 16, 2010, 11:51 PM
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What you're looking for you won't find in drugs. Google Samadhi.

No, I'm not at all religious.

Altering consciousness in permanent ways is easier through meditation than drugs.
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Joesus
post Dec 17, 2010, 11:41 AM
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Not so much easier if you don't know what you are looking for or doing. Not so much easier if you are addicted to the relative beliefs in intellectual boundaries, and you negate any experience that does not fit into the projected norm of reality where life and death border subjective and changing belief systems of life and death, and you reject anything outside of that box.

However if you are open, and have the unique desire to explore the multidimensional reality of life without altering or damaging the nervous system artificially, the mind and nervous system can be tuned to the subtle and opened to the consciousness that resides within the artificial self imposed boundaries of the subjective mind.
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lamarkia
post Dec 18, 2010, 08:07 PM
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Permanent euphoria is not possible in a functional state.
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Joesus
post Dec 19, 2010, 07:29 AM
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QUOTE(lamarkia @ Dec 19, 2010, 04:07 AM) *

Permanent euphoria is not possible in a functional state.

Only if you don't know it or experience it. All relative functional states are bordered by beliefs in impossibilities rather than the experiences of what is possible.
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lamarkia
post Dec 19, 2010, 09:19 AM
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QUOTE(Joesus @ Dec 19, 2010, 07:29 AM) *

QUOTE(lamarkia @ Dec 19, 2010, 04:07 AM) *

Permanent euphoria is not possible in a functional state.

Not if you don't know it or experience it. All relative functional states are bordered by beliefs in impossibilities rather than the experiences of what is possible.


I have never met nor heard of anyone who lives in a state of permanent euphoria. If there are some functional individuals out there who live in this state, I would appreciate someone pointing them out to me.
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Joesus
post Dec 19, 2010, 06:59 PM
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QUOTE(lamarkia @ Dec 19, 2010, 05:19 PM) *


I have never met nor heard of anyone who lives in a state of permanent euphoria. If there are some functional individuals out there who live in this state, I would appreciate someone pointing them out to me.

By Euphoria are you thinking of a state where the mind is separated from reality, the body limp and with reduced mental coordination, with drool slowly dripping from the chin? Or a "euphoric, lucid, ecstatic, transcendent, happy state of mind" described in the opening post by reich42?
One that is artificial or an altered state, or one that is naturally achieved thru mental discipline and heightened awareness?

I can think of examples for all of these descriptions.
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lamarkia
post Dec 19, 2010, 09:24 PM
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Keeping with the OP's description of euphoria. Do you know of living people who have this state of consciousness, permanently?
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kikai93
post Dec 19, 2010, 10:56 PM
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QUOTE(lamarkia @ Dec 19, 2010, 09:24 PM) *

Keeping with the OP's description of euphoria. Do you know of living people who have this state of consciousness, permanently?


Yup.
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lamarkia
post Dec 20, 2010, 08:36 AM
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QUOTE(kikai93 @ Dec 19, 2010, 10:56 PM) *

QUOTE(lamarkia @ Dec 19, 2010, 09:24 PM) *

Keeping with the OP's description of euphoria. Do you know of living people who have this state of consciousness, permanently?


Yup.


Would these yuppies like to post here (with hidden identities) to enlighten the rest of us?
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Joesus
post Dec 20, 2010, 06:06 PM
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QUOTE(lamarkia @ Dec 20, 2010, 05:24 AM) *

Keeping with the OP's description of euphoria. Do you know of living people who have this state of consciousness, permanently?


QUOTE(reich42 @ Jul 28, 2010, 03:31 PM) *
I'm not talking about just being very happy, I'm talking about the best experience you have had on a psychedelic high or whatever got you to the point where you wanted it to last forever but it won't.


If we are keeping with the opening statement and following his train of thought as indicated above, I would have to say no. There is no such thing as a permanent state of drug induced euphoria as he describes it. Anything artificially produced can never be permanent. Also it might suffice to say that when using an artificial means to produce an altered state of mind, the first time can be like having sex for the first time. Every time after is different, and as one becomes "conditioned" to something thru the repetitive use of the conditioning agent, the newness and awe of the first time experience cannot be maintained as one becomes used to or conditioned by something.

The only way one can approach something fresh is without conditioning, or to remove the beliefs absorbed thru conditioning where the mind approaches everything with the subjective labels, where the past is projected upon the future and even the present moment.
The mind would have to be seated in an awareness where all there is, is the present moment allowing for the new experience of something that it has even approached many times before.
In Vedic teachings this is called Bliss consciousness or Samadhi, in Japan Satori.
Or in the West "The peace which passeth all understanding"
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lamarkia
post Dec 21, 2010, 01:19 PM
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QUOTE(Joesus @ Dec 20, 2010, 06:06 PM) *

QUOTE(lamarkia @ Dec 20, 2010, 05:24 AM) *

Keeping with the OP's description of euphoria. Do you know of living people who have this state of consciousness, permanently?


QUOTE(reich42 @ Jul 28, 2010, 03:31 PM) *
I'm not talking about just being very happy, I'm talking about the best experience you have had on a psychedelic high or whatever got you to the point where you wanted it to last forever but it won't.


If we are keeping with the opening statement and following his train of thought as indicated above, I would have to say no. There is no such thing as a permanent state of drug induced euphoria as he describes it. Anything artificially produced can never be permanent. Also it might suffice to say that when using an artificial means to produce an altered state of mind, the first time can be like having sex for the first time. Every time after is different, and as one becomes "conditioned" to something thru the repetitive use of the conditioning agent, the newness and awe of the first time experience cannot be maintained as one becomes used to or conditioned by something.

The only way one can approach something fresh is without conditioning, or to remove the beliefs absorbed thru conditioning where the mind approaches everything with the subjective labels, where the past is projected upon the future and even the present moment.
The mind would have to be seated in an awareness where all there is, is the present moment allowing for the new experience of something that it has even approached many times before.
In Vedic teachings this is called Bliss consciousness or Samadhi, in Japan Satori.
Or in the West "The peace which passeth all understanding"


I agree completely.
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