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> A man with virtually no serotonin or dopamine
Hey Hey
post Mar 19, 2010, 09:48 AM
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Neuroskeptic covers a fascinating case of a man born with a genetic mutation meaning he had a severe lifelong deficiency of both serotonin and dopamine.

The case report concerns a gentleman with sepiapterin reductase deficiency, a genetic condition which prevents the production of the enzyme sepiapterin reductase which is essential in the synthesis of both dopamine and serotonin.

More:

http://www.mindhacks.com/blog/2010/03/a_ma..._virtually.html
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paperdragons
post Aug 14, 2010, 08:52 PM
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Definitely an interesting article. One thing that jumped out at me was the individual's sleep schedule. They said his sleep was divided into three periods - onset around 10:00, a brief awakening between 2:00 AM and 3:00 AM, and another 2-5 hour nap. I would imagine this nap would occur around the 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM postprandial decline (often referred to as the siesta).

What this sounds like to me is the true "normal" human sleep schedule. That is, the natural circadian sleep rhythm humans assume when deprived of light cues. This is followed in many societies which don't have artificial lighting. They often awaken in the middle of the night to reflect on their dreams, possibly discussing them, then they return to sleep for a few more hours. Moreover, the siesta is a common practice in many nations around the world. It gives the body a brief recovery period during mid day...

The Western world, with it's artificial lighting, perpetual sleepiness, and caffeine dependency has been altering & compressing the human sleep time.

I don't know exactly what the significance of this case is, though. There may be no relation, but the match seems too perfect to be coincidence. Serotonin... might it be related to light cues?

Yes. Yes. Light causes production of serotonin. So, this makes sense. Since he can't produce serotonin, his body wouldn't be entrained to the 24-hour cycle, let alone the typical American one. He would probably operate on the renowned ~25 hour circadian cycle which the body maintains internally.

Fascinating stuff, most certainly.
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lucid_dream
post Aug 15, 2010, 07:39 AM
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interesting read. The absence of depression is not that surprising given compensatory and homeostatic mechanisms are likely involved.
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Tone
post Jan 17, 2011, 05:14 PM
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QUOTE(Hey Hey @ Mar 19, 2010, 11:48 AM) *

Neuroskeptic covers a fascinating case of a man born with a genetic mutation meaning he had a severe lifelong deficiency of both serotonin and dopamine.

The case report concerns a gentleman with sepiapterin reductase deficiency, a genetic condition which prevents the production of the enzyme sepiapterin reductase which is essential in the synthesis of both dopamine and serotonin.

More:

http://www.mindhacks.com/blog/2010/03/a_ma..._virtually.html



Serotonin is not a primary related to Well-Being , its endorphin and dopamine. But since no matter how many times i post this, posters will disagree, i find it extremely unpleasant to post on message boards

They go into psychological denial and refuse to believe that people who report SSRI works are:

1) the same as the people who report homeopathy and placebo work. They same personality sub-type as they ones who say things like ginseng works for energy.

2) are always the people who have no perception of their own consciousness, the dreamy people, the kind that the stage hypnotist picks out of the crowd for suggestibility

3) are never the real depressives, they are the people who held jobs and went to school and experienced pleasure to begin with. so theres no desperation for a better feeling.

these three points will always be disbelieved and pretend games will be played with Morton's Forks posted because the population is phony.
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cybergenesis
post Dec 15, 2013, 08:30 AM
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And I thought running out of my Duloxetine was bad!
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