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> Genepax Water Powered Mini Car, Too free to happen?
Hey Hey
post Jun 24, 2009, 11:07 AM
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A Japanese venture company, Genepax, has unveiled a car on that runs on water. All it requires is a litre of water. In fact, any kind of water to be exact, whether its river, rain, sea water, or even Japanese tea. Its an electric powered car that runs solely on hydrogen dioxide.

http://www.ideaconnection.com/innovation-v...ml?ref=nl062309
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Rick
post Jun 24, 2009, 12:13 PM
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It's a fraud. Don't sell your oil company stock just yet.
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Hey Hey
post Jun 25, 2009, 10:25 AM
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QUOTE(Rick @ Jun 24, 2009, 09:13 PM) *

It's a fraud. Don't see your oil company stock just yet.


Such a pity. That little critter could get me down the Shambles in York just fine!

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Rick
post Jun 25, 2009, 01:29 PM
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"There's no such thing as a free lunch." --Milton Friedman

Rick's corollary: "There's no such thing as a free tank of fuel."
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Hey Hey
post Jun 25, 2009, 04:36 PM
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QUOTE(Rick @ Jun 25, 2009, 10:29 PM) *
Rick's corollary: "There's no such thing as a free tank of fuel."
Water has great potential though. Even though there is likely going to be a considerable delay afore fusion power becomes available, it's feedstock will be water. Not free (Many reasons why not. Just think abstraction, transport, purification etc) but usefully cheap for quite a while.
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P.j.S
post Jul 03, 2009, 12:00 PM
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QUOTE(Hey Hey @ Jun 24, 2009, 11:07 AM) *

A Japanese venture company, Genepax, has unveiled a car on that runs on water. All it requires is a litre of water. In fact, any kind of water to be exact, whether its river, rain, sea water, or even Japanese tea. Its an electric powered car that runs solely on hydrogen dioxide.

http://www.ideaconnection.com/innovation-v...ml?ref=nl062309

Hey Hey if you put your guitar in the car then you couldn't get in. So when you have a gig you have to FedEx your instrument to the concert site. Not saving any money there!
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Hey Hey
post Jul 09, 2009, 10:22 AM
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Pee power: Hydrogen from urine to fuel cars?

Scientists have combined refuelling your car and relieving yourself by creating a new catalyst that can extract hydrogen from urine.

The catalyst could not only fuel the hydrogen-powered cars of the future, but could also help clean up municipal wastewater.

Gerardine Botte of Ohio University uses an electrolytic approach to produce hydrogen from urine — the most abundant waste on earth — at a fraction of the cost of producing hydrogen from water.

Urine’s major constituent is urea, which incorporates four hydrogen atoms per molecule — importantly, less tightly bonded than the hydrogen atoms in water molecules.

Botte uses electrolysis to break the molecule apart, developing an inexpensive nickel-based electrode to efficiently oxidise the urea.

To break the molecule down, a voltage of 0.37V needs to be applied across the cell, which is much less than the 1.23V needed to split water.

“During the electrochemical process the urea gets adsorbed on to the nickel electrode surface, which passes the electrons needed to break up the molecule,” Botte told Chemistry World journal.
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