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> EECS: What to Study? Please Help
officespace
post Nov 20, 2008, 10:34 PM
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I’m a junior EECS major at UC Berkeley. I’ve having trouble deciding what to specialize in. I’m cursed with being interested in everything. The general options are: Electronics, Communications, Networks and Systems, Computer Systems, and Computer Science, but I could specialize in anything really. I’m also interested in biology.

I would like to do something that’s cutting edge, but I don’t what is being developed. What would you specialize in if you were me? Nano? Computational Neuroscience? Computational Biology? Software Engineering? I really have no idea what is likely to explode in the next ten years. I’d appreciate any help.
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Phi
post Nov 21, 2008, 05:58 AM
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Why not go for something in the short term, and then if it doesn't pan out, try something new?
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Yocttar
post Nov 21, 2008, 03:38 PM
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QUOTE(officespace @ Nov 21, 2008, 08:34 AM) *

I’m a junior EECS major at UC Berkeley. I’ve having trouble deciding what to specialize in. I’m cursed with being interested in everything. The general options are: Electronics, Communications, Networks and Systems, Computer Systems, and Computer Science, but I could specialize in anything really. I’m also interested in biology.

I would like to do something that’s cutting edge, but I don’t what is being developed. What would you specialize in if you were me? Nano? Computational Neuroscience? Computational Biology? Software Engineering? I really have no idea what is likely to explode in the next ten years. I’d appreciate any help.


My 21 y/o opinion:

Actually, I pretty much have the same problem... but! since I want to know everything, I've decided to start with learning all the basics which include physics, chemistery, biology, computer science, maths etc... that way I have a systematic view on everything, and then I can go and do something cutting edge, right now very interested in neuroscience, might change along the way, but anyhow, I will still try to use all my knowledge to achive my goal.

Anyway, my basic tip for you is to never stop learning, they say you learn something new every day, make it so you learn alot of new things every day. This I can say only because I don't go to any institute in order to spec at anything yet, but if you wish to go to learn at some place, learn something that may use all of your prior knowledge.

Also remember that rule of 80-20 (I don't recall the name of who made up that rule), you can learn 80% of any subject in a pretty short time, for the rest of the 20% you will have to use alot more of your time then learning the 80% altogether.
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Rick
post Nov 21, 2008, 03:51 PM
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I would avoid software engineering. Computational biology seems to have plenty of potential. Things like gene expression and protein folding and function.
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