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> RE: Cannabis increases psychotic illness
YoungS
post May 25, 2008, 06:27 AM
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I am one of the living evidences that Cannabis increases/causes psychosis.

My opinion is that THC caused this illness, messing up my brain chemicals really bad, off course there where playing more things in my life (stress) but the key factor is THC, if I did not take cannabis at that time of my life I would never got paranoid, believed delusional thoughts and started hallucinating.

What i'm trying to say is that stress alone would not made me ill, to back this up: without THC in my brain I am symptomless, THC made changes in my brain, right now when taking just one little hit of weed it's 5 min. of psychosis till the THC worked out.

For me it was the stress increased and THC caused this illness. For me this is a fact.
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Cassox
post May 25, 2008, 10:43 AM
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Meh,
Its more symptomatic of having read pseudoscience reports. There are stronger correlations between heavy drinking and mental illness that pot and mental illness. Obviously, a correlation exists, but its not causative. I have simple solution for you. Stop smoking it if it messes you up.

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Flex
post May 25, 2008, 12:13 PM
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I would be willing to bet you would be diagnosed as bipolar. That could account for your sensitivity to marijuana.
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Joesus
post May 25, 2008, 12:58 PM
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QUOTE
I am one of the living evidences that Cannabis increases/causes psychosis.

Actually anyone who takes their awareness outward reinforcing duality by using any mood or mind altering substance further stresses the nervous system by concentrating ones awareness on feelings and psychological transformation.
When one approaches a system of self measure and by choice alters the perceptions of reality they reinforce all opposite connotations of reality further enforcing the psychosis of mental and physical realities.

Simple example:
Smoke pot to relax. The mind believes it is in a less relaxed state than when it is under the influence of pot.
The reinforcement of subconscious belief that creates addictions of any kind are those that are not consciously thought about but are kept in strength by adding to it through subconscious action.
The waking mind says this isn't harmful but the psychology is that when the effect wears off the mind has already prepared itself for the return to normalcy which is to be under greater stress than while under the influence of the mood altering substance.

I suppose there are some who might think that smoking pot and diverting attention from normal active physiological and psychological function removes the stress from the mind and the body even at a cellular level but that would be wishful thinking rather than common sense.
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YoungS
post May 25, 2008, 12:58 PM
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QUOTE(Flex @ May 25, 2008, 10:13 PM) *

I would be willing to bet you would be diagnosed as bipolar. That could account for your sensitivity to marijuana.


No, schizophrenia.
There is no family history of mental illness in my family, I smoked 2 years (from 18 to 20) without any problems (no hallucination, delusions and paranoia).

I think everyone has some sort of sensitivity to THC when going from puberty to adulthood. The time when the brain makes the last few changes before becomming the person you are for the rest of your life.
I'm not saying that there is a chance that everyone that smokes weed in that period can get psychosis, but I think together with stress it can have a negative influence (in that period) on the devlepomend of the brain by anyone.
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YoungS
post May 25, 2008, 01:03 PM
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QUOTE(Cassox @ May 25, 2008, 08:43 PM) *

I have simple solution for you. Stop smoking it if it messes you up.


[sarcasm on]
Thanks for the advice smartass, didn't know that! Haha..
[/sarcasm off]
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LifeMirage
post May 27, 2008, 12:03 AM
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QUOTE(YoungS @ May 25, 2008, 09:27 AM) *
I am one of the living evidences that Cannabis increases/causes psychosis.

My opinion is that THC caused this illness, messing up my brain chemicals really bad, off course there where playing more things in my life (stress) but the key factor is THC, if I did not take cannabis at that time of my life I would never got paranoid, believed delusional thoughts and started hallucinating.

What i'm trying to say is that stress alone would not made me ill, to back this up: without THC in my brain I am symptomless, THC made changes in my brain, right now when taking just one little hit of weed it's 5 min. of psychosis till the THC worked out.

For me it was the stress increased and THC caused this illness. For me this is a fact.


Cannabis contain compounds that can improve and worsen mental illness. However it does not cause mental illness.
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YoungS
post May 27, 2008, 01:50 AM
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hey Mirage,

The compound in cannabis that prevents mental illness is canabidiol but it has less than 2% in every sort of cannabis.

There is no 'scientific evidence' that it causes nor it does not causes mental illness.
I am speaking of my own expierence and I think that cannabis can damage the dopaminergic pathway of the brain (hearing, senceing, feeling, smelling, tasting).

For example: How do you explain that people who smoke (or drink alcohol) in heavy amounts daily have issues concerning, cognition, motivation, reconizing facial expressions and paranoia that comes with it while under influence. This all together with stress is opening the door to mental illness in some sort of way.

If cannabis is harmless why is it still drugs and not in the category of alcohol and consumed all over the world legally? (Only in the Netherlands it is, haha)

Speaking of my own country many friends of mine have some sort of mental problems due to heavy use of cannabis.

(my thought) The reason that the rate of psychosis did not climb among cannabis smokers is that there are less people who smoke heavily than recreational.

all together I am not a scientist/professor and speaking off my own expierence with cannabis. Even that it messed me up I think it should be legal and people should be educated about the pro's and especially about the con's.

Mirage I would be happy to hear your opinion why you think it does not cause mental illness...
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trojan_libido
post May 28, 2008, 06:27 AM
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QUOTE(youngS)
I am speaking of my own expierence...
You've been diagnosed schizophrenic and you've previously smoked pot. Maybe you smoked pot to fit in because of paranoia caused by the increasing levels of schizophrenic delusion. Maybe the pot did take you over the edge. But I dont think its fair to make a definite statement from you personal situation.

QUOTE(youngS)
For example: How do you explain that people who smoke (or drink alcohol) in heavy amounts daily have issues concerning, cognition, motivation, reconizing facial expressions and paranoia that comes with it while under influence. This all together with stress is opening the door to mental illness in some sort of way.
So its not the pot? Because your analogy makes sense to me, but comes down to EXCESSIVE drug use, legal or otherwise. Which is obviously a problem. Eating only sugar will also kill you and make you extremely hyperactive.

QUOTE(youngS)
If cannabis is harmless why is it still drugs and not in the category of alcohol and consumed all over the world legally?
1. cannabis isn't totally harmless 2. Because of the path of history.

QUOTE(youngS)
Speaking of my own country many friends of mine have some sort of mental problems due to heavy use of cannabis.
Similar situation here, but unfortunately it seems to me as if each person has mental instabilities caused by their inability to cope with life: Jealousy, Anger, Psychosis, Lazyness, Loneliness. Drugs seem to be a symptom of underlying mental issues.

QUOTE(youngS)
(my thought) The reason that the rate of psychosis did not climb among cannabis smokers is that there are less people who smoke heavily than recreational.
Where good quality cannabis is consumed, there are actually less users (eg. Netherlands). If the government actually acted with the knowledge we've all gathered for them instead of its political brain then they'd realise the dangers of illegal cannabis.

It is often very low quality and it is often mixed with things to increase the weight.

This then creates teenage users smoking crap and getting slightly high, meaning they have to smoke more and more to get a real buzz. Then peer pressure and peer perceptions come into it.
'did you see xyz last night? he can really smoke some weed' instead of 'xyz had to smoke five times the quantity of cannabis last night because its rubbish quality'
QUOTE(youngS)
all together I am not a scientist/professor and speaking off my own expierence with cannabis. Even that it messed me up I think it should be legal and people should be educated about the pro's and especially about the con's.
Thats really well thought out, because if everyone stopped treating it like a massive taboo subject, then society wouldn't be split. Everyone would know the good and bad about it and the negative aspects would be lessened to the point of irrelevancy.

Look after yourself dude!
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Flex
post May 28, 2008, 09:39 AM
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Do you think it is any coincidence that knowing nothing but your reaction to cannabis I pulled out bipolar disorder? schizophrenia, schizoaffective, and bipolar disorder are all pretty similar. I believe there is a theory that these disorders are caused by some imbalance of dopamine, or a hypersensitivity to dopamine. If this is the case, it is not a far stretch to assume that marijuana consumption may cause complications with your biology, but this does not mean that it causes psychotic illness; it just happens to manifest what is already there.
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YoungS
post May 28, 2008, 01:39 PM
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[quote]
Do you think it is any coincidence that knowing nothing but your reaction to cannabis I pulled out bipolar disorder? schizophrenia, schizoaffective, and bipolar disorder are all pretty similar.
[/quote]

If you said schizoaffective I would've said almost, I don't see a connection with bipolar, people with bipolar have other problems and medications.

[quote]
I believe there is a theory that these disorders are caused by some imbalance of dopamine, or a hypersensitivity to dopamine.
[/qoute]

Bullseye my friend, if this theory is right than it was (in my case) that cannabis caused this imbalance.

[quote]
If this is the case, it is not a far stretch to assume that marijuana consumption may cause complications with your biology, but this does not mean that it causes psychotic illness; it just happens to manifest what is already there.
[/quote]

very good point, but I partially don't share the same opinion.

Are you trying to say even if I did not smoke cannabis, with stress I would have gone psychotic anyway? NEVER, sorry for the capslock but my family, close friends and I self (the most important one) know me too well to deny that when sober I would have gone 'crazy'..

On the other hand, you are right, maybe my brain had allready some sort of vunarability/imbalance and cannabis only triggered it.

but then again, I support the first part of the theory you mensioned above because together with my opinion about it it makes more sense for me (in my case).

This is still a hot subject among the scientists, we will know in the future what caused psychosis among potheads.

If your right i'll buy you a beer/cannabis otherwise you buy me a beer/cannabis, deal?

edit: ffs I can't get the quotes as it should be..
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post May 28, 2008, 02:42 PM
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QUOTE(YoungS @ May 25, 2008, 06:27 AM) *

I am one of the living evidences that Cannabis increases/causes psychosis.

My opinion is that THC caused this illness, messing up my brain chemicals really bad, off course there where playing more things in my life (stress) but the key factor is THC, if I did not take cannabis at that time of my life I would never got paranoid, believed delusional thoughts and started hallucinating.

What i'm trying to say is that stress alone would not made me ill, to back this up: without THC in my brain I am symptomless, THC made changes in my brain, right now when taking just one little hit of weed it's 5 min. of psychosis till the THC worked out.

For me it was the stress increased and THC caused this illness. For me this is a fact.

Welcome YoungS! I respect your perspective about Cannabis, and I appretiate the fact that you shared it with us. Subjective experiences are always unique in that you just can't find them in the text-books. I'm struck by your post because it ilustrates one of the few times when cannabis actually causes an unpleasant immediate effect on a user; especially on such a young individual. I take it that it all comes down to the type and amount of chemical activity in your brains at the time of consumption. And by that I mean genetics, behavioral disorders, ect. I say stay away from it... But you already know that! Good luck anyway!
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Orbz
post May 28, 2008, 11:01 PM
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You should keep in mind the difference between a drug induced psychosis and schizophrenia. And if symptoms still occur whilst having stopped taking cannabis, then I'm likely to think you have schizophrenia or a schizophrenia spectrum disorder. Otherwise, drug induced psychosis.

QUOTE(YoungS @ May 29, 2008, 05:39 AM) *

If you said schizoaffective I would've said almost, I don't see a connection with bipolar, people with bipolar have other problems and medications.
Many patients go through the system being diagnosed with schizophrenia, then schizoaffective, then bipolar, then schizophrenia, then bipolar ........
QUOTE

Are you trying to say even if I did not smoke cannabis, with stress I would have gone psychotic anyway? NEVER, sorry for the capslock but my family, close friends and I self (the most important one) know me too well to deny that when sober I would have gone 'crazy'..
Its possible, stress induced psychosis is not uncommon. Joesus its probably on the money when he links stress of the nervous system whilst under the influence of drugs which could cause the ensuing psychosis. While I think dopaminergic agents like amphetamines and cocaine could possibly work directly through the dopaminergic system to cause psychosis, cannabis does not interfere with dopamine that much and nor is it taken in the levels needed to induce that kind of dopamine activity. Its more like a stress induced response (cannabinoids interact closely with the glucocorticoid system) that could be causing a drug induced psychosis in cannabis users.

QUOTE

This is still a hot subject among the scientists, we will know in the future what caused psychosis among potheads.
Quite possibly.

QUOTE
The compound in cannabis that prevents mental illness is canabidiol but it has less than 2% in every sort of cannabis.
so?
QUOTE

I am speaking of my own expierence and I think that cannabis can damage the dopaminergic pathway of the brain (hearing, senceing, feeling, smelling, tasting).
There has been zero evidence showing that cannabis 'damages' the dopamine system.
QUOTE

If cannabis is harmless why is it still drugs and not in the category of alcohol and consumed all over the world legally? (Only in the Netherlands it is, haha)
As Trojan said, purely historical.
QUOTE

Speaking of my own country many friends of mine have some sort of mental problems due to heavy use of cannabis.
While we're on anecdotes, I know people who smoke a lot of cannabis who don't have mental problems.
QUOTE

Mirage I would be happy to hear your opinion why you think it does not cause mental illness...
Because there is no evidence that it causes mental illness. I haven't seen any studies which have convincingly linked cannabis to mental illness which has persisted whilst cannabis intake has been stopped. I'm open to such studies if you know of any.
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YoungS
post May 28, 2008, 11:08 PM
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http://www.schizophrenia.com/sznews/archives/006294.html

A new research review published in Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, finds that marijuana / cannabis causes an excess production of dopamine which can trigger psychosis or schizophrenia. The risk was expecially strong

In the new study the psychiatrists conclude that the association is "stronger and clearer than ever".

The research suggests that a pot smoker is 40 per cent more likely to suffer a psychotic episode than a non-smoker, according to the review of major published international research.

And for people who smoke daily over long periods their risk is 200 per cent higher.

Research studies have suggested that while everyone who smoked marijuana / cannabis had increased their risk to some degree, there was increasing evidence that genetics or biology predisposed some people even more. For example, researchers have found that some variations of the gene called COMT is unable to break down the brain chemical dopamine. The researchers suggests that an excess of dopamine triggers psychosis and, as cannabis produces an excess of the chemical, people with this gene variation are especially vulnerable to developing psychosis and schizophrenia.

Researchers have estimated that between 10 and 25 per cent of the population are believed to have the high risk COMT gene variation, but there is no way yet to test for it.


With this article I can clearly state (if they are right) that cannabis 'damaged' the COMT gene that was working fine if did not take cannabis
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YoungS
post May 28, 2008, 11:31 PM
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There are more articles i'll post them later.

Being diagnosed schizophrenia because the 'positive symptoms' last for 6 months (3 months before seeking help, 3 months after) and that only is not enough to diagnose schizophrenia. Have some serious 'negative symptoms' after the psychosis slowely dissapeared, lack of motivation, lack of speech, lack of concentration, failing memory, lack of emotions. That some serious sh*t that made me very depressed.

Someone diagnosed cannabis induced psychosis recover 'fully' and don't have serious brain damage.

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LifeMirage
post May 29, 2008, 11:09 PM
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QUOTE(YoungS @ May 29, 2008, 02:08 AM) *
http://www.schizophrenia.com/sznews/archives/006294.html

A new research review published in Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, finds that marijuana / cannabis causes an excess production of dopamine which can trigger psychosis or schizophrenia. The risk was expecially strong

In the new study the psychiatrists conclude that the association is "stronger and clearer than ever".

The research suggests that a pot smoker is 40 per cent more likely to suffer a psychotic episode than a non-smoker, according to the review of major published international research.

And for people who smoke daily over long periods their risk is 200 per cent higher.

Research studies have suggested that while everyone who smoked marijuana / cannabis had increased their risk to some degree, there was increasing evidence that genetics or biology predisposed some people even more. For example, researchers have found that some variations of the gene called COMT is unable to break down the brain chemical dopamine. The researchers suggests that an excess of dopamine triggers psychosis and, as cannabis produces an excess of the chemical, people with this gene variation are especially vulnerable to developing psychosis and schizophrenia.

Researchers have estimated that between 10 and 25 per cent of the population are believed to have the high risk COMT gene variation, but there is no way yet to test for it.


With this article I can clearly state (if they are right) that cannabis 'damaged' the COMT gene that was working fine if did not take cannabis


Useless study. People who do street drugs have no idea what they are using and many people who abuse/use drugs have psychosis or schizophrenia or in the first place.
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LifeMirage
post May 29, 2008, 11:18 PM
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QUOTE
hey Mirage,

The compound in cannabis that prevents mental illness is canabidiol but it has less than 2% in every sort of cannabis.


There is over 60 cannabinoids in cannabis. Several of them being researched to treat mental illness.


QUOTE
There is no 'scientific evidence' that it causes nor it does not causes mental illness.
I am speaking of my own expierence and I think that cannabis can damage the dopaminergic pathway of the brain (hearing, senceing, feeling, smelling, tasting).


Mental illness is caused by genetic and developmental abnormalities. Abusing any compound can damage the brain and produce effects similar to but not actual mental illness. True mental illness is far more complex than that. I do not consider drug induced brain damage a mental illness, except perhaps stupidity.

QUOTE
For example: How do you explain that people who smoke (or drink alcohol) in heavy amounts daily have issues concerning, cognition, motivation, reconizing facial expressions and paranoia that comes with it while under influence. This all together with stress is opening the door to mental illness in some sort of way.


What healthy person would smoke or drink heavy amounts daily in the first place?

QUOTE
If cannabis is harmless why is it still drugs and not in the category of alcohol and consumed all over the world legally? (Only in the Netherlands it is, haha)


Anything is harmful. Alcohol kills far more people than cannabis.

QUOTE
Speaking of my own country many friends of mine have some sort of mental problems due to heavy use of cannabis.


They had mental illness to begin with. Most people with mental illness do not know they have it.
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trojan_libido
post May 29, 2008, 11:22 PM
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QUOTE
The research suggests that a pot smoker is 40 per cent more likely to suffer a psychotic episode than a non-smoker, according to the review of major published international research.

And for people who smoke daily over long periods their risk is 200 per cent higher.


200% higher than 40%? That can't be right because thats 120%, or possibly 80% depending on the way its worded. Thats a ridiculously high % and would mean there wouldn't need to be studies, it'd be a massively obvious quantity.

Regardless, the fact is it isn't really the cannabis its more likely the release of dopamine. There are many ways in which you can get a dopamine release which is not drug induced which could of also set off latent psychological problems.
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YoungS
post Jun 02, 2008, 05:02 PM
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http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/...80602160845.htm


ScienceDaily (Jun. 2, 2008) — Long-term, heavy cannabis use may be associated with structural abnormalities in areas of the brain known as the hippocampus and amygdala, according to a new article.

Conflicting evidence exists regarding the long-term effects of cannabis use, according to background information in the article. "Although growing literature suggests that long-term cannabis use is associated with a wide range of adverse health consequences, many people in the community, as well as cannabis users themselves, believe that cannabis is relatively harmless and should be legally available," the authors write. "With nearly 15 million Americans using cannabis in a given month, 3.4 million using cannabis daily for 12 months or more and 2.1 million commencing use every year, there is a clear need to conduct robust investigations that elucidate the long-term sequelae of long-term cannabis use."

Murat Yücel, Ph.D., M.A.P.S., of ORYGEN Research Centre and the Melbourne Neuropsychiatry Centre at the University of Melbourne, Australia, and colleagues from the University of Wollongong performed high-resolution structural magnetic resonance imaging on 15 men (average age 39.8 years) who smoked more than five joints daily for more than 10 years. Their results were then compared with images from 16 individuals (average age 36.4) who were not cannabis users. All participants also took a verbal memory test and were assessed for subthreshold (below the standard of disease diagnosis) symptoms of psychotic disorders, which include schizophrenia and mania.

The hippocampus, thought to regulate emotion and memory, and the amygdala, involved with fear and aggression, tended to be smaller in cannabis users than in controls (volume was reduced by an average of 12 percent in the hippocampus and 7.1 percent in the amygdala). Cannabis use also was associated with sub-threshold symptoms of psychotic disorders. "Although cannabis users performed significantly worse than controls on verbal learning, this did not correlate with regional brain volumes in either group," the authors write.

"There is ongoing controversy concerning the long-term effects of cannabis on the brain," the authors write. "These findings challenge the widespread perception of cannabis as having limited or no neuroanatomical sequelae. Although modest use may not lead to significant neurotoxic effects, these results suggest that heavy daily use might indeed be toxic to human brain tissue. Further prospective, longitudinal research is required to determine the degree and mechanisms of long-term cannabis-related harm and the time course of neuronal recovery after abstinence."

Journal reference:

1. Murat Yucel; Nadia Solowij; Colleen Respondek; Sarah Whittle; Alex Fornito; Christos Pantelis; Dan I. Lubman. Regional Brain Abnormalities Associated With Long-term Heavy Cannabis Use. Arch Gen Psychiatry, 2008;65(6):694-701
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trojan_libido
post Jun 02, 2008, 11:52 PM
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Its not much of a controvesty when you consider how much damage to organs drinking does. This is all smoke and mirrors. Do something to excess, pay the price.
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LifeMirage
post Jun 03, 2008, 01:08 AM
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QUOTE(YoungS @ Jun 02, 2008, 08:02 PM) *
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/...80602160845.htm


ScienceDaily (Jun. 2, 2008) ��" Long-term, heavy cannabis use may be associated with structural abnormalities in areas of the brain known as the hippocampus and amygdala, according to a new article.

Conflicting evidence exists regarding the long-term effects of cannabis use, according to background information in the article. "Although growing literature suggests that long-term cannabis use is associated with a wide range of adverse health consequences, many people in the community, as well as cannabis users themselves, believe that cannabis is relatively harmless and should be legally available," the authors write. "With nearly 15 million Americans using cannabis in a given month, 3.4 million using cannabis daily for 12 months or more and 2.1 million commencing use every year, there is a clear need to conduct robust investigations that elucidate the long-term sequelae of long-term cannabis use."

Murat Yücel, Ph.D., M.A.P.S., of ORYGEN Research Centre and the Melbourne Neuropsychiatry Centre at the University of Melbourne, Australia, and colleagues from the University of Wollongong performed high-resolution structural magnetic resonance imaging on 15 men (average age 39.8 years) who smoked more than five joints daily for more than 10 years. Their results were then compared with images from 16 individuals (average age 36.4) who were not cannabis users. All participants also took a verbal memory test and were assessed for subthreshold (below the standard of disease diagnosis) symptoms of psychotic disorders, which include schizophrenia and mania.

The hippocampus, thought to regulate emotion and memory, and the amygdala, involved with fear and aggression, tended to be smaller in cannabis users than in controls (volume was reduced by an average of 12 percent in the hippocampus and 7.1 percent in the amygdala). Cannabis use also was associated with sub-threshold symptoms of psychotic disorders. "Although cannabis users performed significantly worse than controls on verbal learning, this did not correlate with regional brain volumes in either group," the authors write.

"There is ongoing controversy concerning the long-term effects of cannabis on the brain," the authors write. "These findings challenge the widespread perception of cannabis as having limited or no neuroanatomical sequelae. Although modest use may not lead to significant neurotoxic effects, these results suggest that heavy daily use might indeed be toxic to human brain tissue. Further prospective, longitudinal research is required to determine the degree and mechanisms of long-term cannabis-related harm and the time course of neuronal recovery after abstinence."

Journal reference:

1. Murat Yucel; Nadia Solowij; Colleen Respondek; Sarah Whittle; Alex Fornito; Christos Pantelis; Dan I. Lubman. Regional Brain Abnormalities Associated With Long-term Heavy Cannabis Use. Arch Gen Psychiatry, 2008;65(6):694-701



1. Unlike a well controlled study they have no idea what these people were smoking and what other drugs they may have used.

2.
QUOTE
Although modest use may not lead to significant neurotoxic effects, these results suggest that heavy daily use might indeed be toxic to human brain tissue.

While Cannabis is not toxic massive doses of any compound can have a negative effect on cognitive functioning, especially the simple act of smoking any compound.

3. 15 people is slighly suggestive but hardly conclusive.

4. I do not advocate cannabis smoking, however like any plant/drug there are pros and cons to use.

5. Using a pharmaceutical grade cannabis extract studies have not shown any serious risk of cognitive impairment when used as prescribed.

6. Compare to any herb that can contain impure compounds such as Kava Kava while Kava is very safe impure extracts have been linked to death and/or liver damage.
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YoungS
post Jun 06, 2008, 01:45 AM
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06 June 2008

MedWire News: The use of cannabis is associated with prodromal symptoms of psychosis in adolescence, regardless of the presence of other risk factors, say researchers.

Heavy cannabis use is believed to be associated with psychotic symptoms and schizophrenia, but it is not clear whether the drug causes psychoses beyond intoxication, as some studies on the association have been undermined by limitations, explains the team.

Juha Veijola, from the University of Oulu in Helsinki, Finland, and colleagues studied the association between cannabis use and psychotic symptoms among 6330 adolescents aged 15-16 years from a mother-child population-based birth cohort.

The participants completed self-report questionnaires on prodromal symptoms of psychosis and drug use.

In addition, early emotional and behavioral symptoms were collected using the Rutter B2 questionnaire for teachers, and the team gathered information on family type, parental social class based on occupation, history of regular tobacco use, use of other drugs, and parental substance misuse disorder.

The team reports in the British Journal of Psychiatry that 5.6% of the participants reported using cannabis at least once, while 0.9% had used cannabis more than five times. Girls were nonsignificantly more likely to report cannabis use than boys, at 6.1% versus 4.9%.

Participants who had tried cannabis had a significantly higher average number of prodromal symptoms than nonusers, at 3.11 versus 1.88. Analysis revealed that adolescents who had tried cannabis were significantly more likely than those who had not to report at least three prodromal symptoms, at an adjusted odds ratio of 2.23.

Interestingly, the researchers found a dose-response effect with cannabis use, with the proportion of adolescents with high prodromal scores increasing by cannabis use category at an odds ratio of 1.42.

"We showed that these effects are not secondary to confounding effects of other drug use, childhood emotional/behavioural problems or family background," the team concludes.

"The association is therefore unlikely to be caused by these or any closely related factors, supporting the hypothesis that cannabis use may be causal in terms of subsequent psychotic symptoms."



http://www.inpsychiatry.com/news/article.aspx?id=75467
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LifeMirage
post Jun 06, 2008, 07:30 AM
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Self-report questionnaires are not actual research and thus worthless.
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Rick
post Jun 07, 2008, 12:49 PM
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Also, cannabis users may be more observant of their own internal states and therefore be more likely to report extant or latent symptoms of psychosis.
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onk
post Sep 14, 2011, 03:20 PM
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QUOTE(YoungS @ May 25, 2008, 12:58 PM) *

QUOTE(Flex @ May 25, 2008, 10:13 PM) *

I would be willing to bet you would be diagnosed as bipolar. That could account for your sensitivity to marijuana.


No, schizophrenia.
There is no family history of mental illness in my family, I smoked 2 years (from 18 to 20) without any problems (no hallucination, delusions and paranoia).

I think everyone has some sort of sensitivity to THC when going from puberty to adulthood. The time when the brain makes the last few changes before becomming the person you are for the rest of your life.
I'm not saying that there is a chance that everyone that smokes weed in that period can get psychosis, but I think together with stress it can have a negative influence (in that period) on the devlepomend of the brain by anyone.


I think part of the problem with drugs of any type is the allure it creates for those who are unstable and looking for relief in the first place, even the shamans used them only periodically so what makes the average person think they can abuse them when 99 % arent even self aware of themselves to start with ?

Thats bit like asking a car whose driving it , then expecting driver ( whom you cant see inside ) if hes aware hes inside , nevermind driving the car.

drugs should be one of the most respected things there are , but instead their the most abused , that should tell you something .

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onk
post Sep 14, 2011, 03:28 PM
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QUOTE(YoungS @ May 25, 2008, 06:27 AM) *

I am one of the living evidences that Cannabis increases/causes psychosis.

My opinion is that THC caused this illness, messing up my brain chemicals really bad, off course there where playing more things in my life (stress) but the key factor is THC, if I did not take cannabis at that time of my life I would never got paranoid, believed delusional thoughts and started hallucinating.

What i'm trying to say is that stress alone would not made me ill, to back this up: without THC in my brain I am symptomless, THC made changes in my brain, right now when taking just one little hit of weed it's 5 min. of psychosis till the THC worked out.

For me it was the stress increased and THC caused this illness. For me this is a fact.


Must add too ,I am sick of people not taking responsbility in this day and age and blaming everything else but themselves , Im not saying this applies to you , but IMO its pretty selfish to go about jepordising the potential of cannabis for others just because you had bad experince.

There are organisation like MAPS that have spent yrs trying to get the government to allow them to investigate it , and all it needs is for some idiot to come along and poohoo so the PC crowd , can go " told you so ".

Even a toothpick can damage you if its the wrong the hands.

ive only had cannabis x6 and enjoyed it immensely - mainly because it pratically cured me of the terrible neuroapthy like pain ive had since 99

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Flex
post Sep 15, 2011, 07:05 AM
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Onk I have to agree with you in regards to personal responsibility. Unfortunately, you are talking about a drug. Responsibility IMO goes out the window with drugs. The world would be a much better place were it stripped of the knowledge of all drugs legal or otherwise. It is really like the Apple of Eden.

I have absolutely no doubt in my mind that cannabis can induce psychosis in those who are predisposed, and might not otherwise show signs. Anyone who is not firmly grounded in "reality" who experiments with drugs will go off the deep end.

Are these people crazy? Hell no. The people who are crazy are the ones who don't question reality in the first place. Illness is defined as a disease or period of sickness affecting the body or mind. Can cannabis cause mental illness? YES. If cannabis can induce a period of sickness for you then it does CAUSE the illness. Any pseudo doctor such as Life Mirage who tells you otherwise is 1.) insensitive and 2.) not fit to be a medical professional.

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