BrainMeta'   Connectomics'  

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

3 Pages V < 1 2 3 >  
Reply to this topicStart new topic
> Depression After Exercise
correlli
post May 01, 2009, 10:37 PM
Post #31


Aspiring
**

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 84
Joined: Apr 12, 2009
From: New Zealand
Member No.: 32044



QUOTE(Hey Hey @ Apr 30, 2009, 03:08 PM) *

QUOTE(correlli @ Apr 19, 2009, 12:59 AM) *

I would recommend some protein and carbs, Green Tea, Vitamin C, and maybe some Ginseng. The immune system drops after exercise. If you're crashing after exercise, you run the risk of infection.

Sounds very authoritative. Could you provide the evidence please.



Peters EM, Goetzsche JM, Grobbelaar B, et al. Vitamin C supplementation reduces the incidence of postrace symptoms of upper-respiratory-tract infection in ultramarathon runners. Am J Clin Nutr. 1993;57:170-174.

Hemila H. Vitamin C and common cold incidence: a review of studies with subjects under heavy physical stress. Int J Sports Med. 1996;17:379-383.

Yamada H, Takuma N, Daimon T, et al. Gargling with tea catechin extracts for the prevention of influenza infection in elderly nursing home residents: a prospective clinical study. J Altern Complement Med. 2006;12:669-672.

Predy GN, Goel V, Lovlin R, et al. Efficacy of an extract of North American ginseng containing poly-furanosyl-pyranosyl-saccharides for preventing upper respiratory tract infections: a randomized controlled trial. CMAJ. 2005;173:1043-1048.
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
jono
post Aug 28, 2009, 12:19 AM
Post #32


Newbie
*

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 3
Joined: Aug 28, 2009
Member No.: 32332



exercise doesn't usually cause people to get depressed unless your overtraining or exerting yorself beyond your fitness levels.

its probably the stimulants in the supplements or other issues in your life you need to address.
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
oanadoledo
post Jan 05, 2010, 01:34 AM
Post #33


Newbie
*

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 8
Joined: Dec 09, 2009
Member No.: 32514



try to find some exercise that make you happy and satisfaied like dancing
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Robski
post Aug 10, 2010, 08:05 PM
Post #34


Newbie
*

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 1
Joined: Aug 10, 2010
Member No.: 32982



I use to feel horrible after my workouts especially if I was dieting. Sometimes I couldn't even make it to the locker room without crying for no reason in front of everyone. So I did my research and I suspected I was hypothyroid because I had all the symptoms. I do have a history of anxiety and depression. I had my blood tested and although my TSH was slightly elevated my doctor didn't do anything. A week later I came in after a workout and had my blood tested again. My TSH rose over 3 points and I had thyroid antibodies and that was enough for my doctor to put me on T4. T4 is converted into T3 in the body. If there is not enough T4 or T3 your TSH will go up because it is trying to work harder to bring those levels back up to normal. I've read a study that concluded T3 levels are suppressed after exercise and this is the hormone that Endocrinologists prescribe to hypothyroid patients when they are depressed. I'm not a doctor, but I am studying biochemistry. I could be wrong, but I doubt it because I no longer get depressed after my workouts and I can diet now smile.gif This is probably not the answer for everyone, but it was for me.
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
paperdragons
post Aug 14, 2010, 08:14 PM
Post #35


Newbie
*

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 20
Joined: Aug 14, 2010
Member No.: 32993



A few possible ideas:

Overtraining: How frequently are you doing your exercise? Have you tried giving yourself a break for a few days to a couple of weeks, and then starting up again? How much do you sleep? You should be getting about eight hours if you're on a workout regimen. Perhaps a nap after exercise could improve your condition.

What else in the day do you look forward to besides exercise? If exercise is the highlight of your day, or the singular moment of "productivity," its completion may lead to some existential despair. It might be subconscious, but in a sense you loose a sense of purpose and identity.
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Need to know
post Sep 16, 2010, 09:29 AM
Post #36


Newbie
*

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 1
Joined: Sep 16, 2010
Member No.: 33091



QUOTE(otto @ Sep 03, 2008, 03:30 PM) *

Yes. Yes. Yes.

As an engineer I realized many years ago that my mood was linked to exercise. Whenever I exercised the following conditions would creep up within 2-3 hours and last for about 3 days:

-sweating
-nurvousness
-anxiety
-irritability & anger
-stiff joints & muscle pain
-lack of sleep
-depression

Continual exercise would only exasperate the conditions above with what I would describe as an almost compounding effect. In my case even fairly light exercise would lead to drastic changes in behavior.

Several years ago I tried to get an explanation but was constantly shouted down by the zealots professing how wonderful exercise and diet is. I took several tests to no avail. No amount of food, drink, diet, vitamins or other healthy lifestyle changes have ever made any impact on reducing my symptoms. Simply put exercise in any form is pure poison to my system.

I should probably mention that I was tested at one point for hypoglycemia but unfortunately that did not turn out to be the culprit. My wife's pleading finally got me to give up attempting exercise as the behavioral changes were just too drastic in nature and were going to get me fired at work. Fortunately I'm in good health with weight in check.

Final thought... I do realize that exercise is good in most people. My wife for instance gets all of the benefits of exercise plus a behavioral boost... like a "runner's high". In my case however exercise sends me like clockwork "through the roof" into a violent near non-functional state. As an engineer I wish I had a solution but unfortunately I've yet to find a cause.

User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Flex
post Mar 11, 2011, 02:40 AM
Post #37


God
******

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 1954
Joined: Oct 17, 2006
From: Bay area CA
Member No.: 5877



Lol don't know why I didn't think of this before... Just popped into my head at 2:30 am a good 2 years after my post smile.gif

Branched chain amino acids--there is your answer. It has to do with the alanine cycle. Branched chain amino acids donate a NH2 to pyruvate to regenerate alanine, which when exercising is converted to glucose in the liver. In addition to this, branched chain amino acids have the unique ability to be used as an energy substrate by the muscles themselves.

Branched chain amino acids prevent the drop off of blood glucose and the resulting depression. This occurs through an interesting mechanism involving the transport of tryptophan into the brain by a transport system that moves both tryptophan and valine into the cerebrospinal fluid. With carb ingestion there is increased transport of tryptophan and results in increased serotonin synthesis.

The short version, go get some Amino Fuel, and take a swig before and after your workout smile.gif On top of preventing the depression, you have the added anabolic effect of BCAA.
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Guest
post Mar 19, 2011, 05:41 AM
Post #38


Unregistered









QUOTE(Need to know @ Sep 16, 2010, 09:29 AM) *

QUOTE(otto @ Sep 03, 2008, 03:30 PM) *

Yes. Yes. Yes.

As an engineer I realized many years ago that my mood was linked to exercise. Whenever I exercised the following conditions would creep up within 2-3 hours and last for about 3 days:

-sweating
-nurvousness
-anxiety
-irritability & anger
-stiff joints & muscle pain
-lack of sleep
-depression

Continual exercise would only exasperate the conditions above with what I would describe as an almost compounding effect. In my case even fairly light exercise would lead to drastic changes in behavior.

Several years ago I tried to get an explanation but was constantly shouted down by the zealots professing how wonderful exercise and diet is. I took several tests to no avail. No amount of food, drink, diet, vitamins or other healthy lifestyle changes have ever made any impact on reducing my symptoms. Simply put exercise in any form is pure poison to my system.

I should probably mention that I was tested at one point for hypoglycemia but unfortunately that did not turn out to be the culprit. My wife's pleading finally got me to give up attempting exercise as the behavioral changes were just too drastic in nature and were going to get me fired at work. Fortunately I'm in good health with weight in check.

Final thought... I do realize that exercise is good in most people. My wife for instance gets all of the benefits of exercise plus a behavioral boost... like a "runner's high". In my case however exercise sends me like clockwork "through the roof" into a violent near non-functional state. As an engineer I wish I had a solution but unfortunately I've yet to find a cause.



I too am an engineer, and I too have been struggling with this same problem. As engineers, we do tons of research, and we have to separate the good advice from the bad. About 5 years ago I went to see a doctor about this problem, and after a blood test, it was suggested that I seek psychological help. The world says that exercise is the solution to these problems and not the cause, and I'm here to tell the world that they are wrong in this case. I've done a lot of reading and a lot of research, and I followed guidelines on nutrition, sleep, and hydration, and the same thing happens. I've done everything right as far as that goes. I am fine during the workout, and fine immediately after the workout, but for the next 2 or 3 days I get hot-tempered and moody. We all probably have problems in our lives, and I seem to stew over mine (which aren't bad in reality) for the two or three days after exercise. If someone says something wrong, I can sometimes brood over it for an hour or more. During that, I tell myself that it's me and not what they said, and I think it's the chemicals involved, or lack thereof, that won't put my mind at ease. If there is a slight agitant in my life, in those 2 or 3 days after a workout it gets magnified x 5 because of my state of mind. My skin gets oily, I sometimes get a pimple or two, and I just don't feel like smiling or doing my usual joking around about everything and getting people to laugh. I feel like my wings have been clipped because the most exercise I can do without triggering this is walking. If I want to do something strenuous, I have to be sure it is at least 3 days before any sort of interaction with difficult people or sensitive situations that I normally could defuse with humor.
I read a post just before this about branched chain amino acids, and it seemed to include a great explanation that wasn't just haphazardly thrown out there as so many others with good intentions tend to do. I'm going to try it. I have a kayak, a bike, and a nice new punching bag & stand, and I really want to be able to use them without problems. I'm all ears (eyes in this case) if anyone has any other thoughts. Keep in mind, I've done all of the basics that many people always remind me to try.
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Flex
post Mar 19, 2011, 07:47 AM
Post #39


God
******

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 1954
Joined: Oct 17, 2006
From: Bay area CA
Member No.: 5877



Your case seems very interesting. Have you had testosterone levels checked? Has this always been the case? Age? What guidelines on nutrition and hydration?

Branched chain amino acids are probably not the culprit in your case, due to the prolonged duration. You seem to have a pretty unique physiology. I would be willing to bet that you have a broad jaw, and that your ring finger is significantly longer than your index finger smile.gif
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Puzzled Guy
post Mar 19, 2011, 01:02 PM
Post #40


Unregistered









QUOTE(Flex @ Mar 19, 2011, 07:47 AM) *

Your case seems very interesting. Have you had testosterone levels checked? Has this always been the case? Age? What guidelines on nutrition and hydration?

Branched chain amino acids are probably not the culprit in your case, due to the prolonged duration. You seem to have a pretty unique physiology. I would be willing to bet that you have a broad jaw, and that your ring finger is significantly longer than your index finger smile.gif


I'm almost 35, 6'1", 250 lbs. I'm not ripped, not obese, but I'm built a lot like a football player [not on purpose, I want less mass]. I did have testosterone levels checked, and they were within range. In my early 20's I used to jog and lift and do whatever I wanted to do with no mood problems afterward. As far as nutrition guidelines, I can't remember specifics, but I was very strict about it. The bottom line was I ate the amount of grams of good carbs and protein when I was supposed to, with the correct snack after a workout, with the amount of water per my bodyweight that was popularly believed to be correct.
I do have a broad jaw, and my ring fingers are longer than my index fingers. I'm intrigued, what does that mean?
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Flex
post Mar 19, 2011, 04:36 PM
Post #41


God
******

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 1954
Joined: Oct 17, 2006
From: Bay area CA
Member No.: 5877



Just means that you have had a strong influence from testosterone in development. You may not have high testosterone levels, but you may have some sort of increased affinity? Only thing I can come up with in your case.
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Puzzled Guy
post Mar 20, 2011, 08:40 AM
Post #42


Unregistered









QUOTE(Flex @ Mar 19, 2011, 04:36 PM) *

Just means that you have had a strong influence from testosterone in development. You may not have high testosterone levels, but you may have some sort of increased affinity? Only thing I can come up with in your case.


Thanks, I never knew! I don't know if my levels are actually high or not, but that test (it was a mail-in test) suggested that I had no shortage of testosterone. I am out of ideas to try.
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Flex
post Mar 20, 2011, 01:07 PM
Post #43


God
******

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 1954
Joined: Oct 17, 2006
From: Bay area CA
Member No.: 5877



Well you can start by eating less animal products, particularly red meat and dairy. Increase fiber in your diet, ideally from soluble fibers (I like inulin, brand name Fibersure). High total fat intake has been shown to increase testosterone levels as well, but this is not the case for polyunsaturated fatty acids; so, eat more fish, or take a flax/fish oil supplement (I suggest a flax supplement, and wild caught fish) and reduce other fats particularly saturated.

It is really the ratio of polyunsaturated to saturated fat that is key. You want to make absolutely sure your ratio of poly/sat is grater than 1--the higher the better. As an engineer, I am sure you can appreciate consequences of simple calculus in regards to ratios. By working on both the numerator and denominator simultaneously, you will have an exponential effect on the ratio rather than linear. Ideally eliminate all dietary sources of cholesterol (animal products, with fish being an exception due to high EPA/DHA levels).

Incorporate more of these foods/herbs:
Soy (coumestrol)
Red Clover
White Clover
Juniper
Licorice
Thyme
Tumeric
Hops

Try drinking a glass of wine or beer each night. Ironically, you may do better working out harder, or more precisely, more consistently. By not allowing your body to recover, you can inhibit testosterone production. This could be sort of tricky to avoid injury from over training, but it might be worth a try. Test it out for a week.
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Bob-
post Sep 02, 2011, 01:10 AM
Post #44


Newbie
*

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 1
Joined: Sep 02, 2011
Member No.: 33556



I read about a research article that might explain this. You see people differ in approach and avoidance motivation. Approach motivation generally is associated with positive emotions and left prefrontal cortex dominance. Right prefrontal cortex activation is associated with avoidance motivation, this mostly includes negative emotions such as anxiety and depression.

Exercise increases prefrontal cortex activity, but the research found that the increase depended on the baseline prefrontal cortex activity before the exercise. People with a more general positive mood (with a more general left prefrontal activity) showed mostly a left PFC activity increase after exercise. Those with right PFC activity as a trait on the other hand, showed a more right increase in activation after exercise, which in theory should decrease their mood even further. I really couldn't find the article again, but I'm pretty sure this increase in negative mood was also stated in the article.

So how to change your brain trait? Well current medicine and science is pretty pessimistic. It took them decades to even accept that the brain could grow new neurons. I wouldn't be surprised if their answer would be: No you're born with your brain traits and can't change them. Fortunately the field of positive psychology, a counter-response to this pessimism, has done some research into this. It seems that these left and right brain traits develop in self strengthening ways. If you have had a lot of positive events in your life, it increases approach motivation. The increase in positive mood and apparently even a related improvement in cognitive functions, increase the number of positive emotions and events you're likely to experience.

Negative moods and experiences on the other hand move into the other direction, by strengthening each other and the related decrease in general cognitive capabilities.

So it really seems that some psychological factors determine general brain activity and chemistry, which in turn affect the outcome of your exercise. Still a lot of depressed people DO get a benefit from exercise, I guess in their case the depression is temporary and hasn't yet forced itself as a generally negative mood trait.

Then again I might be completely wrong about everyhing, Ill try and find the two related articles to this post.
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Neurosearcher
post Sep 06, 2011, 05:27 AM
Post #45


Newbie
*

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 4
Joined: Sep 05, 2011
Member No.: 33564



QUOTE(yume @ Mar 22, 2008, 07:50 PM) *

I have been struggling with this for some time...First off I suffer from depression, and as I know from research, etc Exercise is one of the best activities to engage in to stave off depression.

Here's where my problem lies, when Im training (ie I do strength training, boxing, muay thai, wrestling, Jiu-jitsu, etc) I feel great, sometimes not completely confident all the time (as with the combat types of training) but over all I have a rebound effect that is very stimulating and promotes wellbeing.

This lasts for about 1/2 hour afterwards, then suddenly I crash hard! To the point where I am in a deeper depressive state than when I started, often times I feel like just crying for no apparent reason. This even occurs when I have my best workouts.

What could be the cause of this? Are there others out there with similar experiences? Suggestions, discussion, etc.

Thanks

Yume


Have you tried soem Phosphpotidylserine ? It helps regulate cortisol which is released during times of stress or when working out. It will offer calm without sedation. Im not a pharmaicist but have read this somehere on a few occasions. I like Phos because it literally smooths out my thought patterns which will help if you need to think fast on your feet.
Good luck !
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
albert
post Oct 30, 2011, 11:24 AM
Post #46


Newbie
*

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 7
Joined: Sep 28, 2011
Member No.: 33623



well i heard it first time that somebody get depressed after doing exercise if that is the case then you must move from physical exercise to yoga exercises it will definitely calm you down and you will feel more relax
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
NewTruth
post Jan 10, 2012, 12:45 PM
Post #47


Newbie
*

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 2
Joined: Mar 11, 2009
Member No.: 31957



QUOTE(Ralph @ Apr 30, 2009, 01:51 AM) *

I have had this problem, too, for many years. I used to fear working out because of it.

There is anxiety and depression in my family. My grandmother self-medicated with alcohol and my mom tends to get sad easily. In my 20s, I had panic attacks. Drugs related to valium like Klonopin could help with the panic attacks, but I realized the rebound anxiety was not worth it. Prozac finally ended my panic disorder over about a 2 year period.

Even after stopping Prozac, I noticed that exercise would lead to a panic state. As some on here have suggested, I began to think I must be hypomanic, borderline bipolar. Time and experience has led me to a different conclusion.

In my hunt for something which would help with the post exercise blues and grumpiness, I tried a lot of different things: SAM-e (improved my mood, but I was still agitated), Kava Kava (helped with the fear, but tended to do nothing for the depression), and 5-HTP (unpredictable; it would sometimes do the trick but I coudn't depend on it).

Finally, I tried something which led to a breakthrough for me: large doses of GABA (2 grams) taken on a nearly empty stomach. The effect wasn't immediate but within 2 hours, the fear was nearly gone and the agitation was replaced by a gentle sense of calm. It made me a little sleepy though. The afterglow lasted for two days.

Later, I found another form of GABA called Picamilon which is niacin bound with GABA. It gives me the calming effect without making me as sleepy. The niacin supposedly helps to pull the GABA through the blood brain barrier. An even better drug would be very low doses of GHB, but unfortunately, the feds have criminalized it.

In any event, my theory goes like this, the exercise releases excitory chemicals -- cortisol or excess norepinephrine -- and GABA is the big stop sign which slows everything down in the body. The agitation we feel after exercise is a result of the fact that certain people don't produce enough natural GABA to ameliorate the effects of the excitory chemicals. I would be willing to bet that most of those who have this problem already have a problem with anxiety and depression which the exercise causes to express itself more profoundly.

There are some treatments that you take and think to yourself "this is a decent solution, but not really a cure." For me anyway, GABA (either the supplement by itself or Picamilon) is pretty close to a cure.

I hope that this info helps. If it does, drop me a line some time and let me know: taite at panix dot com
Ralph

I'm going to try it.. and let you know..
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
happydays
post Jan 28, 2012, 02:08 PM
Post #48


Newbie
*

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 1
Joined: Jan 28, 2012
Member No.: 33930



I'm not sure if you've found an answer yet but I spent 4 years suffering with this problem and finally found my answer.
6 months ago, I went to a naturopath after I developed shortness of breath (probably from avoiding physical activity because it made me depressed). He found that I had pyroluria (which causes the body to excrete B6 and zinc) and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency (which decreases a person's ability to process B vitamins into their activated form that the body can use). About a week after starting mega-doses of pyridoxine p5p (vitamin b6), methyl-guard (activated forms of B vitamins), and B-complex #3, my mood improved. A month after starting B vitamins, I was able to exercise without any negative consequences.
If you have any questions, feel free to PM me. Hope everything is well for everyone!
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
josephrettig
post Feb 08, 2012, 12:20 AM
Post #49


Newbie
*

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 15
Joined: Feb 08, 2012
Member No.: 33958



Always i eat light food before and after exercise and specially after exercise i just drink only juice.


User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
josephrettig
post Feb 08, 2012, 12:21 AM
Post #50


Newbie
*

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 15
Joined: Feb 08, 2012
Member No.: 33958



I just wanna say you that you got your solution finally.
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
josephrettig
post Feb 08, 2012, 12:30 AM
Post #51


Newbie
*

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 15
Joined: Feb 08, 2012
Member No.: 33958



I don't know why have depression after exercise
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
josephrettig
post Feb 08, 2012, 12:49 AM
Post #52


Newbie
*

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 15
Joined: Feb 08, 2012
Member No.: 33958



please anyone let me know about this depression?
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
N73
post Sep 24, 2012, 05:36 PM
Post #53


Newbie
*

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 1
Joined: Sep 24, 2012
Member No.: 34558



QUOTE(otto @ Sep 03, 2008, 03:30 PM) *

Yes. Yes. Yes.



Final thought... I do realize that exercise is good in most people. My wife for instance gets all of the benefits of exercise plus a behavioral boost... like a "runner's high". In my case however exercise sends me like clockwork "through the roof" into a violent near non-functional state. As an engineer I wish I had a solution but unfortunately I've yet to find a cause.


I totally understand and agree. I used to be a fitness leader, and know how exercise made me feel great. But I went through a period of very high stress and a near break down and ever since, excercise where I push myself hard results in me wanting to curl up on the couch and cry. Dont let people tell you that you are making it up, that its an excuse for being lazy. As someone who has been that person who tell everyone how good exercise makes you feel (and it can) to one who now feels so bad after..here is some advice

Excerise moderately. ie. go for a gentle walk, get plently of fresh air and Vitamin D, but dont push. Dont even break a sweat. Just relax and enjoy it.
Even if you are not sleeping properly, get early nights and rest in bed. Do some deep yoga breaths and relax your body, even if you brain is still racing.
and all the usual eat well and drink water applies to :-)

My friend tells a story about spoons. Let me try o remember it:
Basically she says we each are given a certain amount of spoons that make up our energy for the day. SOme have more than others, each thing you do uses a spoon ...ie, getting up making breakfast...
SOme things alow you to add spoons to your day: Healthy food, a good laugh, other things deplete them. sadness, stress, junk food etc
Basically, once all the spoons are gone, you feel completely empty and you just cant keep going. Thats how I feel after exercise. For most people, exercise would be in the category of adding a spoon or two, for me (and you) it seems to take quite a few away, leaving me completely drained.

So my point here is please, dont feel like you are alone, (I have for a very long time)
Please dont listen to others who say you are being silly or lazy
Listen to your body. It knows best, rest when it tells you, exercise gently and try and relax. :-)
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Tone
post Sep 30, 2012, 03:40 PM
Post #54


Overlord
****

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 423
Joined: Mar 03, 2006
From: Chicago
Member No.: 4916



Exercise being an anti-depressant is a Psycho-Somatic hoax

The person is getting done what they have a compulsion to do, whether its praying, house work, exercise, and when they fulfil than compulsion, they then say it has an "effect" where they were good to begin with and no effect exists other than their psychological compulsions being carried out.

When a person is "into" something, they then say the doing of that something has an "effect". They are too unsophisticated and ignorant to understand what a real actual effect on consciousness is and are confused people.

This is also why SSRIs and false drugs continue to sell , same reason as reasons stated above. THats false-"effect" as well. The population and its establishments like government, medicine, etc are all largely very stupid, dysfunctional & confused and this is a fact not an opinion, because you can just list hundreds of things instantly off the top of your head. Their brains don't actually work, they are simply bots who carry out jobs and errands, eat, sleep & shit & are programmed with fallacies that they say is true and give false evidence, then narcissistically never admit the truth.

User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
CharlesD
post Oct 06, 2012, 11:43 AM
Post #55


Newbie
*

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 11
Joined: Oct 06, 2012
Member No.: 34591



Maybe take 5mg/day selegiline, its used for major depression / depression that doesnt respond to the standard SSRI. It's also a nootropic, with many benefits and anti-aging properties
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
shanewatson384
post Dec 03, 2012, 02:27 AM
Post #56


Newbie
*

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 19
Joined: Oct 10, 2012
Member No.: 34598



There are number of websites dedicated to people who are looking for fitness and exercise programs. Simply you have to post your queries in these sites and you will get answer for your problems. A reputed and best weight loss sites also have discussion board. Types of aerobic exercises, nutritious diet, tips for losing ten pounds in two months are some most demanding topics you can find in these discussion boards.
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
br549
post Mar 25, 2013, 08:18 AM
Post #57


Newbie
*

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 1
Joined: Mar 25, 2013
Member No.: 34996



QUOTE(yume @ Mar 22, 2008, 10:50 PM) *

I have been struggling with this for some time...First off I suffer from depression, and as I know from research, etc Exercise is one of the best activities to engage in to stave off depression.

Here's where my problem lies, when Im training (ie I do strength training, boxing, muay thai, wrestling, Jiu-jitsu, etc) I feel great, sometimes not completely confident all the time (as with the combat types of training) but over all I have a rebound effect that is very stimulating and promotes wellbeing.

This lasts for about 1/2 hour afterwards, then suddenly I crash hard! To the point where I am in a deeper depressive state than when I started, often times I feel like just crying for no apparent reason. This even occurs when I have my best workouts.

What could be the cause of this? Are there others out there with similar experiences? Suggestions, discussion, etc.

Thanks

Yume


I can think of two things that might cause this.

The first thing is magnesium deficiency. Go get some of that supplement called ZMA and follow the directions. Its Magnesium, Zinc, and Vitamin B-6. That really helped me. I used to want to crawl into a coffin after exercising and it turned out that I was deficient in magnesium. There weren't any tests that told me that I was deficient in it. I just researched the problem until I found my answer. I started taking ZMA and that solved that problem. Go get some ZMA and take it and see if it helps. There's a lot of stuff on the web about magnesium deficiency so do a web search about that if you are interested.

While magnesium supplementation has helped tremendously and has solved the post workout malaise that used to come over me and make me want to crawl into a coffin, I still get a little cranky after working out and my ADD symptoms seem to get worse too. I'm working on a theory that the post workout shake causes this. I put whey protein and dextrose in my post workout shake. I think that the dextrose is having its desired effect which is driving the amino acids into the muscles. The down side of that is that there may not be enough aminos left in the blood to make feel good neurotransmitters. I'm taking a Vitamin B-50 and 2g of l-taurine about 30 minutes after the post workout shake and that seems to be making me feel better. The jury is still out on that though.

I hope that helps. I know its been a long time since your original post but I hope it helps.
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
matthewebbert
post Apr 03, 2013, 03:10 PM
Post #58


Aspiring
**

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 76
Joined: Mar 27, 2013
Member No.: 35004



Some people who have been consistently exercising over a long period of time find that they don't experience the same feelings of euphoria after a workout and equate this to depression.
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
TheGreatest
post Apr 09, 2013, 11:52 PM
Post #59


Newbie
*

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 6
Joined: Apr 09, 2013
Member No.: 35034



try to do tantra.. it's much good for you... but you need to have another person to do tantra or tantra massage.. try to read the details to this site whatistantricsex dot com... I "ll wait for the result if you do it.. happy.gif
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Justin Garner
post Jan 08, 2014, 01:35 AM
Post #60


Newbie
*

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 10
Joined: Jan 06, 2014
From: United Kingdom
Member No.: 36922



Normally, exercise should boost your mood and leave you feeling energized and ready to face the rest of your day. These feelings largely occur due to the release of "feel-good" chemicals known as endorphins, which are produced by your body when you exercise. Endorphins serve to reduce your perception of pain and improve your mood. But don't beat yourself up if you feel depressed after your workout. Instead, examine what's going on inside and see if you might be your own worst enemy.
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post

3 Pages V < 1 2 3 >
Reply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 



Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 19th November 2017 - 06:19 AM


Home     |     About     |    Research     |    Forum     |    Feedback  


Copyright BrainMeta. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use  |  Last Modified Tue Jan 17 2006 12:39 am

Consciousness Expansion · Brain Mapping · Neural Circuits · Connectomics  ·  Neuroscience Forum  ·  Brain Maps Blog
 · Connectomics · Connectomics  ·  shawn mikula  ·  shawn mikula  ·  articles