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> New "Deep" TMS, Can target almost any brain area
BrainStim
post Feb 23, 2008, 09:59 AM
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Brainsway Deep TMS link

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Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a noninvasive technique used to apply brief magnetic pulses to the brain. The pulses are administered by passing high currents through an electromagnetic coil placed adjacent to a patient's scalp. The pulses induce an electric field in the underlying brain tissue. When the induced field is above a certain threshold, and is directed in an appropriate orientation relative the brain's neuronal pathways, localized axonal depolarizations are produced, thus activating the neurons in the relevant brain structure.

Standard TMS coils are limited to activation of only cortical brain regions, up to a depth of about 1.5 cm. Hence when treating depression with a standard TMS system, the limbic system, which is related to mood regulation and is generally deeper than 1.5 cm, is only indirectly affected, through secondary processes involving cortical structures, which are directly activated by TMS and then affect the deeper limbic system structures.

The unique technology of Brainsway Deep TMS System enables direct non-invasive activation of deep brain structures.

Deep TMS is a breakthrough in the search for a non-invasive approach for treating common brain disorders. Deep TMS uses a unique, patented coil design to produce directed electromagnetic fields that can induce excitation or inhibition of neurons deep inside the brain. The treatment is non-invasive, with no significant side effects, no systemic effect (in contrast to drugs), and no need of hospitalization or anesthesia.


Deep Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation link
QUOTE
"The magnetic coil, which is placed on specific areas of the patient’s scalp, sends strong directed magnetic pulses through the brain to stimulate the Nucleus Accumbens (the part of the brain responsible for positive stimuli) and the neurons connected to it. “By repeated artificial stimulation of electrical activity created by the coil, we boost the sensitivity of these circuits so they will work more efficiently,” says Dr. Hilik Lewkovitch, at Brainsway."

"The result is that the next time natural stimulation occurs, such as something pleasant that the brain responds to, the patient will respond more strongly, enjoy it more, and seek to repeat the experience. By intensifying sensitivity this causes the patient to respond normally to the environment."


Trailers from a documentary about this technology.
Invisible Mind fields Documentary link 1

Documentary link 2

Documentary link 3

MINDWARE 60 min. documentary film, © 2007
Directed by Nadav Harel, produced by Nadav Harel and Gili Sasover
Mindware (pdf file) link
QUOTE
The prospect of manipulating our minds with machines has for decades been considered a cybernetic fantasy belonging to the realm of literature and cinema, now, after “softening up” by advances in science and science fiction, far fewer people find the notion of neuro-enhancement troublesome. Its potential clients are not just the radicals who long for a post-human future, but ordinary people who grew up in the information age. Join us as MINDWARE aims to chronicle the first steps of an experiment set out to provide genuine human benefit for the millions currently suffering from severe mental disorders such as depression.


Deep Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation link
QUOTE
HOD HASHARON, Israel (Reuters) - Scientists in Israel are reaching deeper into the minds of the clinically depressed to try to lift their spirits.

Using a locally developed upgrade to Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) therapy, they can now send electronic currents induced by alternating magnetic fields up to 8 cm (3 inches) into the brain to stimulate parts that had been out of reach.

The improved technology was developed in 2002 by Israeli scientists, led by Abraham Zangen at the Weizmann Institute of Science, and described that same year in an article published in the Journal of Clinical Neurophysiology.
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Palaver87
post Mar 28, 2008, 12:51 AM
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awesome! it still stimulates the cortex though. useful tool nonetheless. i guess you could compare deep brain stimulation and have two controls: cortex only stimulated group and normals.
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BrainStim
post Mar 28, 2008, 06:28 PM
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awesome! it still stimulates the cortex though. useful tool nonetheless.


No, I think they can stimulate inner brain regions without stimulating the cortex:

Deep TMS
QUOTE
The Hesed coils (H-coils) are a novel development in rTMS, designed to achieve effective stimulation of deeper neuronal regions without inducing unbearable fields cortically, thus broadly expanding the potential feasibility of TMS for research and treatment of various neuropsychiatric disorders. Thus, it may theoretically be possible to exploit the temporal characteristics of the neuronal response, in order to improve dramatically the efficacy and focality of the stimulation of deep brain structures, potentially enabling focused stimulation of deep regions with no activation of cortical brain regions.
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BrainStim
post Jun 20, 2008, 06:00 PM
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Deep transcranial magnetic stimulation

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Instead, Abraham Zangen, one of two inventors of Brainsway's deep TMS approach, and his colleagues designed a new coil configuration that is able to excite neurons at a depth of four centimeters, using the same intensity of current used in standard TMS coils. Instead of a single coil generating a single magnetic field through the brain, Zangen has outfitted a helmet with a number of small coils, each producing a separate magnetic field. As researchers run a standard current through the helmet, the coils, which are connected in a series, produce multiple fields that add up, generating a much stronger magnetic field that goes deeper into the brain before dropping off.

Zangen and his team have tested the helmet on a group of 50 people with severe depression, all of whom showed no improvement after taking antidepressants. During the double-blind clinical trial, half of the patients underwent deep TMS treatment at electrical intensities comparable to standard TMS for five days a week for four weeks, while the other half underwent similar treatments at lower intensities. Each treatment lasted about 20 minutes, during which patients wore the helmet while researchers periodically administered two-second electrical pulses. After the experiment, 50 percent of the patients who received the higher-intensity version reported significant improvements in sleep, appetite, and overall mood, while none of the others did. Most patients in the higher-intensity group also performed better on a standard cognitive test evaluating depression.
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BrainStim
post Sep 02, 2008, 09:19 AM
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Another article about this brain stimulation technique.
Deep TMS

QUOTE
A decade ago, researchers claimed to have found a way to shock the brain and relieve depression by means of TMS - transcranial magnetic stimulation. This involves treatment in which a magnetic field is created in the brain by means of weak electric currents run through a coil placed on the patient's head. The magnetic field arouses nerve cells in the brain only in the region to which it is directed. The technology entered psychiatric use about 10 years ago, when it began to be used in research on victims of Parkinson's Disease. The patients very quickly reported an improvement in their frame of mind. Researchers then began to investigate the use of TMS technology for depression as well.

Depression is now defined as an illness of the brain. People with depression suffer from irregular electrical activity in various regions of the brain. Existing TMS instruments are limited in their ability to create a magnetic field capable of penetrating deep into the brain; instead, they succeed mainly in penetrating the outer sections of the brain, known as the cortex. The breakthrough came from Israel.

In 2003, in an article published in Scientific American, the American psychiatrist and neurologist Mark George likened the search for technology that would enable penetration of the brain to the medieval quest for the Holy Grail. George declared that the inventor of the neurological grail had been found: Dr. Abraham Zangen from the Weizmann Institute.

"What is new about this instrument is its ability to reach deep regions of the brain," Zangen explains. "If the previous technology made it possible only to reach the outer layer - a centimeter or two into the skull - the new instrument can penetrate to a depth of seven centimeters. That actually makes it possible for me to reach every place in the human brain without surgical intervention. Today, when we know that many pathologies, such as autism and depression, have their source in electrical activity within the brain, we can reach those places. We chose to focus on an experiment involving depression, because quite a bit of knowledge has accumulated concerning the specific locations of that pathology."

Why only now?
"The world is more than busy dealing with TMS technology. There is so much to study, even in the outer layer of the human brain, that researchers have more work than they can handle. Apparently no one thought of taking it one step further, another few centimeters into the brain."

According to Dr. Harel, the development of the new technology was inevitable, "but there are also great qualms, especially in connection with an instrument that can affect mental processes so simply."

Zangen developed the idea when he was studying "reward-related regions" in the human brain, a system involved in processes related to feelings of pleasure, which is damaged in people who are depressed or addicted. The original study was conducted on laboratory animals using an electrode implanted in the relevant nerve center of the brain. The next stage was to arouse the same stimulation without surgical intrusion. Thus Zangen was exposed to TMS technology.


A book can be found here.

Other information can be found at this forum
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Yocttar
post Nov 20, 2008, 02:31 PM
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Thanks alot for that, another thing I can find in Israel and I didn't know about, LOVE YA!
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Indigo Sky
post Jul 28, 2009, 11:08 AM
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Is this like a Shakti helmet?
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magellan
post Jan 08, 2010, 10:25 PM
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shakti helmet is pretty much the same thing
have to admit I love it but it can be very scary at times
sometimes I sense as though someone is standing there behind or beside me
this is a common thing. it's just neurons firing.
very serious visualizations and what feel like OOBE
lucid dreaming is common the first few weeks
I doubt it's recommended but I take nootropics before the session and it intensifies the effects for me
I wouldn't recommend nootropics with god helmets for most people
you have to find the frequencies/brain target regions that work best for you
about the closest to zen I've ever felt
sometimes effects last for days on end
powerful meditation/enlightenment tool
be careful though. only do it 2-3 times a week
back off if any unpleasant experiences
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