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xanadu
post Jul 17, 2007, 11:34 AM
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Naturally, most research is done on women's diseases but this seems to apply across the board.

http://www.newstarget.com/001069.html

A new study reveals that physical exercises is more than just good for your heart and body weight: it also prevents endometrial cancer and breast cancer according to a study involving 850 women. The more the study subjects exercised, the less their odds of being diagnosed with cancer, even if they were considered "at risk" for the disease.

This study confirms what many health-minded professionals have known all along: physical exercise is a proven strategy for remaining free of chronic disease. It helps with more than just cancer, too, of course: diabetes can frequently be prevented through physical exercise alone. With exercise, high cholesterol disappears, heart health improves dramatically, joint flexibility is greatly enhanced, and people lose excess body fat.

The fact that exercise is now being shown to prevent cancer is important for one more reason: it proves that cancer is systemic, not local. In other words, cancer is a whole-body failure, not just a specific tumor or lesion that can be surgically removed or targeted with radiation. Because cancer is a systemic failure, it must be treated holistically (literally!) -- that is, the whole person must be considered: their physical health, immune system function, mental health, spiritual health, and of course their day to day activities such as eating and exercising. Only through a whole-person approach can any healer (accredited or otherwise) offer real hope for reversing cancer.

Now here's some good news: when cancer is treated holistically and the patient gets involved by radically altering their dietary and exercise habits, most cancers can be reversed without drugs or surgery. In the real world, however, very few patients actually make the changes needed to achieve good health. I know many people who have suffered from cancer, and those who die from the disease are consistently the people who refuse to change their diet or engage in regular exercise. Those who quickly recover from the disease are those who pull out all the stops and make the "big changes" like giving up all soft drinks for life, eating no processed foods, and engaging in physical fitness training for 2-3 hours per day
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Hey Hey
post Jul 17, 2007, 12:33 PM
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You need to be aware that there is a difference between prevention and treatment.
QUOTE(xanadu @ Jul 17, 2007, 08:34 PM) *
most cancers can be reversed without drugs or surgery
Have you lost your mind? Where is the evidence for this (rhetorical, as I really don't want to see references from looneyherbalists.com or howlingatthemoon.org)?

You're spoiling the good name of exercise here!
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xanadu
post Jul 17, 2007, 12:53 PM
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Troll, go away

"Have you lost your mind? Where is the evidence for this (rhetorical, as I really don't want to see references..."
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Rick
post Jul 17, 2007, 03:01 PM
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Diet does not improve breast cancer survival:

http://www.reuters.com/article/healthNews/...M77699720070717

So maybe exercise is key. It will be interesting to see the results of that study.
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Rick
post Jul 17, 2007, 03:09 PM
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"Disease and cancer treatment-related side effects such as decreased energy level, muscle weakness, and declines in functional status and body mass have been well documented. There is evidence that exercise, such as low intensity aerobics walking, Tai Chi, or cycling, results in an overall decrease in fatigue levels over the course of cancer treatment. Additionally, there is evidence that regular physical activity or exercise can decrease emotional stress, blood pressure, the duration of neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, and pain. Exercise also has been shown to increase quality of life and improve the maximal oxygen uptake during exertion, sleep patterns, and cognition. However, the majority of studies of exercise and cancer have been conducted with women with early stage breast cancer, limiting the generalizability of these studies to other cancer populations. The purpose of this systematic review is to provide a synthesis of the extant research evidence about the benefits of exercise related to cancer recovery."

Abstract of "Exercise and Cancer Recovery"

http://www.nursingworld.org/ojin/hirsh/topic3/tpc3_2.htm

It appears that the necessary studies have not yet been performed.
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xanadu
post Jul 17, 2007, 03:53 PM
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Rick, that's a good article. There is a lot more out there on the subject. I'll post another good link later on. I didn't mean for the first post to be the last word on the subject. I've seen probably a dozen articles about the positive benefits of exercise on recovering from cancer treatment and prevention of it in the first place. Sedentary people are at the greatest risk of all diseases ranging from diabetes, to cancer, hypertension, heart attack, stroke and so on.

Exercise has been shown to reduce risks of many diseases but not to prevent them totally. I figure you go with where the numbers point. Just like with wearing a seat belt, it may not save your life but the odds are you are safer wearing it. Then someone will come along with a story about someone who died because they wore a belt and the person tossed free lived in the same wreck. That proves nothing, wearing the belt is safest.
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Hey Hey
post Jul 17, 2007, 06:15 PM
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QUOTE(xanadu @ Jul 17, 2007, 09:53 PM) *

Troll, go away
"Have you lost your mind? Where is the evidence for this (rhetorical, as I really don't want to see references..."
Maybe you don't like the idea of discussing issues, but you'd rather have everyone assume that your postings should stand as singularly authoritative, without dissent or alternatives. It's not going to happen on BrainMeta as there happen to be one or two brains around. My response is not trolling, but an attempt to point out quackery and the dangers of treatments that have no scientific basis. The confusion between prevention and treatment and the implications that holistic treatments with exercise alone can effectively treat cancers are serious errors. There is no doubt that a lifestyle including exercise can improve wellbeing and one can imagine that exercise, as a component of general fitness will have some preventative value. But for treatment, cancers require conventional medical intervention if patients are to benefit from serious pain alleviation and/or extended life expectancy. The evidence for this fills textbooks, journals and educated minds worldwide.

By the way, where was the study reference in the article you posted as sourced from newstarget? What type of journalism is that? This is a subjective article amidst a plethera of blatant advertising on the given webpage. The disclaimer regarding the authors payment still leaves scope for payments from advertisers in a variety of ways.

I recommend you read the article on secularism and responsibility that I posted elsewhere on BrainMeta. The issues are similar here - one should not push dogmas subjectively without a deep consideration of one's responsibilities.
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khenwood
post Jul 18, 2007, 06:27 AM
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Unfortunately, the article comes from a NewsTarget.com URL & the author writes "with a passion for sharing empowering information to help improve personal and planetary health". So basically.... he's sharing his empowering message with us, which doesn't seem to have any scientific facts or study of his own to back it up. Authors like Mike Adams are in abundance & this type of "feel good" article is everywhere nowadays.

I think the only good it serves is to increase health awareness & promote discussion between people that don't have a scientific background (or at least a more inquiring mind to research cancer treatments). But you also don't want these people to get incorrect ideas & discuss them as if they were true!

But for the rest of us, this kind of article is overlooked. Or intentionally disregarded may be better phrase. I see so many articles like this, I don't pay attention to them anymore.
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Hey Hey
post Jul 18, 2007, 06:56 AM
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QUOTE(khenwood @ Jul 18, 2007, 03:27 PM) *
Unfortunately, the article comes from a NewsTarget.com URL & the author writes "with a passion for sharing empowering information to help improve personal and planetary health". So basically.... he's sharing his empowering message with us, which doesn't seem to have any scientific facts or study of his own to back it up. Authors like Mike Adams are in abundance & this type of "feel good" article is everywhere nowadays.

I think the only good it serves is to increase health awareness & promote discussion between people that don't have a scientific background (or at least a more inquiring mind to research cancer treatments). But you also don't want these people to get incorrect ideas & discuss them as if they were true!

But for the rest of us, this kind of article is overlooked. Or intentionally disregarded may be better phrase. I see so many articles like this, I don't pay attention to them anymore.
Quite! And calmly said. Not to undermine the importance of exercise and a good frame of mind as an aid to prevention of disease and to assist in therapy and recuperation, alongside a scientifically validated diagnosis and treatment by a qualified medical practitioner.
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xanadu
post Jul 18, 2007, 01:32 PM
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http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m082...4_v6/ai_9198109

Can exercise prevent cancer? The answer is yes, in some types
Vibrant Life, July-August, 1990 by Jamie Truscott Kwako

Can Exercise Prevent Cancer?

Steven N. runs for his life. Every day, with rhythmic regularity, his feet pound the pavement from his house to the park and back. Through spring rain and autumn leaves, winter cold and summer heat, Steven runs not only because he likes being fit, but also because he believes that exercise will protect him from the ravages of diseases such as heart disease and cancer. Is Steven right? Can exercise protect him from these devastating diseases?

Scientific studies have shown that exercise is associated with longevity and can protect against heart disease, the number one killer in the United States, but the effect of exercise in preventing cancer, the second leading cause of death, is less certain. Although the study of exercise and cancer is still in its infancy, what is becoming increasingly clear is that many cancers are preventable through exercise.

Life-saving Josb. An early study, led by Dr. David Garabrant at the University of Southern California in 1984, explored the association of colon cancer with exercise on the job. Men with sedentary jobs, such as accountants, lawyers, musicians, and bookkeepers, were found to have a 60 percent greater risk of colon cancer compared to men with active jobs, such as carpenters, plumbers, gardeners, and mail carriers.

Subsequent studies have confirmed that occupational physical activity reduces the risk of colon cancer. But this does not necessarily mean that you should give up your desk job to become a lumberjack. Those of us with more sedentary jobs can get adequate protection by building exercise into our schedules.
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Hey Hey
post Jul 18, 2007, 02:12 PM
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Although I support exercise as part of a healthy lifestyle, I am keen to point out (again ...yawn) that intelligent readers will see this article is biased, subjective and misleading. As a comparison with the edited version provided by xanadu I have provided below another possible edit, to show how one can mislead quite easily.

Scientific studies have shown that exercise is associated with longevity and can protect against heart disease, the number one killer in the United States, but the effect of exercise in preventing cancer, the second leading cause of death, is less certain.

What About Other Cancers? Researchers who have studies the relationship between exercise and cancers of the lung, pancreas, prostate, upper intestine, stomach, bladder, and rectum have found no relationship.

... exercise did not appear to be protective against other types of cancers. Dr. Severson feels this is a real effect. "Based on what I saw in our data, I don't conclude that there is any strong relationship between physical activity and the other cancers we looked at."

Dr. Severson cautions against premature conclusions. "Most of the studies that have been done on physical activity so far have been on adult-level physical activity and the effect on adult cancers that occur later on in their lives. Nobody's really looked at the effects of physical activity at very young ages to see how it affects the risk of cancer later on in adult life, although it's not unreasonable to look at that."

And here is an additional criticism. What sort of bibliography is provided with the article on findarticles.com? It is one reference with no details and it cycles back to a page in the original article:

Bibliography for "Can exercise prevent cancer? The answer is yes, in some types"
Jamie Truscott Kwako "Can exercise prevent cancer? The answer is yes, in some types". Vibrant Life. July-August 1990. FindArticles.com. 18 Jul. 2007. http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m082...4_v6/ai_9198109

When I asked Shawn to create this new board it was in the context of a science-evidence-based discussion medium (BrainMeta.com Forum > Science > Medicine > Fitness & Exercise). Please endeavour to stick to this format. There are plenty of websites out there in which to discuss these issues in a "faith" context, and I quite understand that where conventional treatments have failed, some people might understandably clutch at straws. But let's not basket weave on BrainMeta. Rather let's try and critically discuss the evidence. First, of course, one has to provide the (actual) evidence. Credible references help.
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xanadu
post Jul 21, 2007, 02:56 PM
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http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/health/...-7m9cancer.html

June 9, 2007

Breast cancer survivors – even obese ones – seem to delay death from recurring cancer or other disease if their daily lifestyle includes 30 minutes of exercise and five servings of fruits and vegetables.

That's the conclusion of a UC San Diego study involving 1,490 women who were diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer between 1991 and 2000. After the women were treated and became cancer-free, researchers tracked their habits for six to 11 years.

The study was released yesterday and will be published tomorrow in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

It found that the death rate for women with a high-fiber diet and high physical activity was 44 percent lower than the rate for women with low levels of exercise and low consumption of plant-based foods.

One serving equals a piece of fruit, a cup of raw vegetables or half a cup of cooked vegetables. Exercise is defined as brisk walking for at least 30 minutes. Whether the women ate organically or conventionally grown produce didn't seem to matter, said John Pierce, the report's lead author.

“We think this study is important because it's the first to suggest that physical activity and nutrition might negate the obesity factor, which puts women at higher risk of being diagnosed with a recurrent breast cancer and dying from it,” said Pierce, director of cancer prevention and control at the Moores UCSD Cancer Center in La Jolla.

“The key is you must do both – diet and exercise,” he added.

A previous study concluded that breast cancer survivors who ate high-fiber diets lived longer than those who didn't. A different study documented longer life spans for breast cancer survivors who exercised regularly. The UC San Diego report is the first to combine both components.

Pierce and his colleagues said their findings applied most to women with hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer, which accounts for about two-thirds of all breast cancers in the United States. It involves diseased cells that are propelled by hormones, which drugs such as tamoxifen can subdue.


Advertisement
In an accompanying editorial for the oncology journal, researchers from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle praised the UCSD study.

“(It adds) to a growing body of literature that lifestyle does matter in breast cancer prognosis. Increasing physical activity to 30 to 60 minutes per day is a recommendation for the general population ... and should be extended to breast cancer patients and survivors,” Rachel Ballard-Barbash and Anne McTiernan wrote.

However, McTiernan and Ballard-Barbash cautioned that the new study didn't account for which breast cancer treatments the participants had received or how adherent they were to tamoxifen, a drug that is highly effective but has side effects.

Dr. Edith Perez, a breast cancer specialist with the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., called the study “interesting (and) reassuring that these good behaviors have a positive impact.”

But she noted that some of the report's findings contrasted with those of other studies indicating higher odds of recurrent cancer for people who are obese.

Perez also said the UCSD study relied on participants' recollections of their diet and exercise patterns. “Many people diagnosed with cancer say they're going to revolutionize their lives, but they get treatment and do well and then go back to their old habits,” she said.

The new study stems from Women's Healthy Eating and Living, a large project that Pierce oversees. The project has received $30 million from the National Cancer Institute over the past 12 years, plus $5 million from the Walton Family Foundation.

At the outset of the project, researchers recruited women from San Diego and six other cities in California, Arizona, Oregon and Texas. These patients had completed their cancer therapy and become cancer-free, although some were still taking tamoxifen.

When they enrolled in the project, the participants were asked about their diet and exercise habits. Pierce said his team's data showed that the women maintained their healthy patterns for at least six years of the study period.

The participants were tracked for mortality from any cause. Recurring breast cancer led to 80 percent of the 135 deaths recorded, Pierce said.

One of the study participants, Irina Ossovskaya of Carmel Valley, was diagnosed with breast cancer nine years ago. She was 36 then.

Before her diagnosis, Ossovskaya exercised occasionally. She began jogging daily after she finished her chemotherapy and radiation treatments.

Ossovskaya enrolled in the project in hopes that her participation would help others with breast cancer improve their odds of survival.

“Now, it looks like there is a relationship between eating healthy and exercising regularly,” she said. “So this study was definitely worthwhile.”
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khenwood
post Jul 23, 2007, 07:59 AM
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xanadu - I just read an article this weekend, that "shows" that a healthy diet means absolutely squat when it comes to breast cancer prevention.

That's the problem with health news sources.

For every bit of "proof", there's a bit of information elsewhere that proves otherwise..
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xanadu
post Jul 23, 2007, 11:32 AM
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Khenwood, you need to filter for the quality of study, not just what someone says it says. Often when you look over the data you find it indicates something other than what the writer of the article claims it shows. I realize your mind is made up on the subject. If you have actual information to give us, then go ahead. To say you heard something means little if we can't evaluate it for ourselves. To just repeat endlessly your opinion does not help. People want facts, not opinions.
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deceit
post Jul 23, 2007, 12:15 PM
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I respect both xanadu and hey hey for their many consistently informative posts. Both members give much of their time to this forum community. I like this forum because I have come to know the members to an extent, after about a year of reading their posts. What makes this such a great place are analytical people. I do not believe that exercising is going to cure cancer, but I believe their is much truth to studies that show correlations between reduced cancer occurrence and exercise. I do not believe this is dangerous or unreasonable information.
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khenwood
post Jul 24, 2007, 06:32 AM
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QUOTE(xanadu @ Jul 23, 2007, 03:32 PM) *

Khenwood, you need to filter for the quality of study, not just what someone says it says. Often when you look over the data you find it indicates something other than what the writer of the article claims it shows. I realize your mind is made up on the subject. If you have actual information to give us, then go ahead. To say you heard something means little if we can't evaluate it for ourselves. To just repeat endlessly your opinion does not help. People want facts, not opinions.


Xanadu - Strange, but it seems like you are only reiterating what I've said before. I wasn't trying to argue with you or restate my opinion. I was actually trying to back you up a little, by showing that for a lot of health topics out there, there are news articles that either support or debunk theories about it.

My mind isn't made up on the subject - I'm simply talking about the cons of bad newspaper publishing.

And to say I "heard" something? As if somebody told it to me in passing? Not the case.

The article I made reference to was an actual scientific study that had been published. Compared to your newstarget.com article, written by a man who gives "empowering speeches" & doesn't actually present scientific evidence of his own.

I find it interesting that you say "People want facts, not opinions." Why would you post your newstarget.com article then, which is clearly more opinion/point of view than fact? If people want facts, they'll go read a publication. If people want opinions, they'll go to a forum to discuss the facts which is what we're doing here. If you can't handle people making calm, rational comments about your posts (whether in agreement with your point of view or otherwise), then perhaps you shouldn't post.

That being said, I'm not irritated or angry.. Tone/Attitude can be easily taken the wrong way in a forum. happy.gif

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xanadu
post Jul 24, 2007, 12:14 PM
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khenwood, I gave an article with a synopsis of a study done at UC San Diego and being published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. You say you "just read an article this weekend..." with no link or copied material and tell me that is the same thing and of the same value as what I gave. You went on to rant at me and said I should not post anymore. If you have something of substance to contribute on the subject, I will be glad to discuss it with you but I will not respond anymore to posts like your recent one. Have a nice day.
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khenwood
post Jul 25, 2007, 06:40 AM
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Clearly you don't read through a posted response.

I won't repeat what I've previously said, nor will I contribute to your other posts in the future.
I believe you are the first person I've run into on BrainMeta to act like this.

If you choose to be offended by simple discussion, that's up to you.

Adios happy.gif

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gordman
post Oct 12, 2007, 09:35 PM
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Well that's an interesting thing to hear... if I think better, I don't exercize at all.
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jono
post Aug 28, 2009, 12:24 AM
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holistic medicine has nothing on traditional medicine when it comes to treating cancer especially aggressive types. It's utterly ridiculous to refute this. At best diet and exercise is a good adjunct to proper medical treatment.
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jono
post Aug 28, 2009, 12:29 AM
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unless someone here is a Dr that has experiece treating cancer, then taking an armchair expert's view by referencing internet articles hardly makes for a compelling argument for holistic medicine over traditional for treating cancer. if holistic medicine really did do something that was statistically significant for sufferers then we'd certainly hear more about it.
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Lindsay
post Aug 29, 2009, 01:31 PM
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QUOTE(jono @ Aug 28, 2009, 12:29 AM) *
... if holistic medicine really did do something that was statistically significant for sufferers then we'd certainly hear more about it.
Jono, in my opinion, nothing all by itself, prevents and/or cures any disease, including cancer. There is no magic bullet.

However, also in my opinion, there are some things which are important and essential components--that is, essential parts of the process of healing. For example, oxygen rich air is an essential component. Deprive people of air for two or more minutes and they will go unconscious and die, no matter how healthy they are, otherwise.

Way back, in the 1960's--as a counselor with a background in psychology, and theology--I began working with members of the healing arts, including medical doctors. I began helping them help people with psychological (mental) and pneumatological (spiritual) problems which were making them sick, somatically (physically).

Jono, IMO, any so-called holistic approach which does not include teachings as to how the physical, mental, and spiritual can work together, is not really holistic. Check out the work of Dr. Andrew Weil. He used to teach at Harvard.
http://www.drweil.com/

One final question: How many of you are aware ot the important role that enzymes--found only in raw foods--play in keeping the body at optimum health?

Anyone interested in understanding how enzymes help maintain good health, feel free to send me a PM. Meanwhile, check out the following:

http://www.vitalitymagazine.com/node/365

BTW, in 1996, the judicious use of digestive enzymes, approved of by my family doctor and surgeon, helped me avoid having to have major cancer-related surgery on my small intestine.
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zadienorris
post Jul 29, 2010, 10:50 PM
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Physical exercise is good for a lot of things. It helps you get in shape; it helps you lose excess fat; it gives your body more power, stamina, flexibility and agility; and it helps you feel good about yourself. While harmful material may still be coming into the body at the same rate, there is faster excretion, and it stays in the body for a very short amount of time. It is not enough time for cancer to take hold.



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albert
post Sep 28, 2011, 11:38 AM
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well with healthy diet and regular exercise we can prevent many diseases but its not possible to cure a disease like cancer with healthy diet and exercise only


yoga today
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eleanor123
post Apr 25, 2012, 03:08 AM
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Here are list of few exercises which helps in preventing cancer :
1. Walking
2. Yoga
3. Dancing
4. Rollerblading
5. Tai Chi
6. Join A Team Sport
7. Swimming
8. Hiking
9. Cycling

This exercises lowers the risk of cancer to an certain extend and helps an individual to stay fit and healthy.
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Macky
post May 31, 2012, 10:19 PM
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Yes, I agree with you.
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guenevere99
post Sep 21, 2012, 02:18 AM
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QUOTE(eleanor123 @ Apr 25, 2012, 03:08 AM) *

Here are list of few exercises which helps in preventing cancer :
1. Walking
2. Yoga
3. Dancing
4. Rollerblading
5. Tai Chi
6. Join A Team Sport
7. Swimming
8. Hiking
9. Cycling

This exercises lowers the risk of cancer to an certain extend and helps an individual to stay fit and healthy.


Nice sharing. I agree with you.
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Ruthen
post Jun 27, 2013, 10:40 PM
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Appreciating your efforts for sharing this valuable post with us. Exercise is key to fitness, it enhance your fitness as well as prevents you from several diseases like cancer, diabetes, heart problems, back pain etc. So adopt a good fitness plan that help you in maintaining fitness.
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matthewebbert
post Aug 07, 2013, 01:37 PM
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There's abundant evidence that exercise and eating right can help prevent people from getting cancer. The latest information shows that exercise for cancer patients can also keep cancer from recurring.Some of these benefits include an increased level of fitness, greater muscle strength, leaner body mass, and less weight gain.
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Justin Garner
post Jan 07, 2014, 02:37 AM
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Exercise is one of the most important actions you can take to help guard against many types of cancer. Many people exercise to prevent heart disease, but exercise can also play a key role in preventing cancer. Most cancers are caused by lifestyle factorsnot genes.
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