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> Calorie restriction gives health
xanadu
post Jun 22, 2007, 11:47 AM
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http://www.mercola.com/2002/nov/13/calorie_restriction.htm

Calorie Restriction Offers More Than Weight Loss


Following a calorie-restricted diet has been shown to slow the effects of aging on the muscles, brain and heart. New findings show that cutting calories may also reduce chronic disease by slowing age-related changes in the genes of the heart.

In a study using 14-month-old mice (middle-aged for mice), it was found that those fed a calorie-restricted diet experienced fewer heart genetic changes brought on by age-close to 20 percent less-than those fed a regular diet. Additionally, potentially harmful changes in the immune system as well as apoptosis, a form of cell death, were decreased.

The findings suggest that calorie-restriction, even if begun in middle-age, can slow aspects of the aging process. Researchers mention that in order to gain benefits, a 30 percent decrease in daily caloric intake would be sufficient, however one must be certain that they are getting enough of the necessary vitamins and minerals.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences October 2002;10.1073

Dr. Mercola's Comment:


As I said last year:

Anti-aging medicine has never been a major interest of mine. I have heard of calorie restriction as a potent way to slow down the aging process, but I never paid much attention to this type of research.

However, last July I had the privilege of attending a lecture by Dr. Ron Rosedale at Designs for Health Institute's BoulderFest Seminar. Dr. Rosedale helped me understand the importance of grain restriction five years ago and at this seminar he opened my eyes once again.

He is convinced that most disease is an artifact of the RATE at which we age. There appear to be two potent influences on this aging rate. One is the amount of food one eats (as mentioned above) and the other is one's insulin level.

A low grain, no sugar eating plan is one of the most effective ways to lower one's insulin level. This is especially effective when combined with an aerobic-type cardiovascular exercise program. Ideally, one should increase his/her heart rate to about 75 percent of its maximum rate and maintain the rate for 45 minutes, five times a week.

I have been monitoring my patients' insulin levels for the past few months and am now convinced that exercise is a potent method to reduce one's insulin levels.

The other major perspective shift I learned from Dr. Rosedale is that it is likely very healthy to fast occasionally.

What is the take-home practical benefit from this?

Well, how many of us have been faced with trying to follow the eating plan at a party or restaurant where there are just no good food options available?

Guess what the other option is?

Don't eat anything. You can reframe this very positively as, I mentioned previously, occasional fasting is a healthy practice for most people. So you can tell yourself that making this choice will actually improve your health and allow you to live longer.

I have actually applied this a number of times very successfully when I have been traveling and there are no healthy breakfast options. Alternatively you could use Whey Healthier, a high quality protein drink in a very convenient format that I recommend highly and regularly use.

Lowering your insulin levels may be the fountain of youth. Consuming sugar and grains will increase your insulin level, and that is the equivalent of slamming your foot on the aging accelerator. There is simply no more-potent way to accelerate aging than eating sugar and grains.
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lucid_dream
post Jun 22, 2007, 02:29 PM
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The benefits of caloric restriction in rodents have been known for decades, though few humans are able to chronically cut their caloric intake to 60% of normal intake. Other strategies include fasting for 24 hrs every other day (and eating all you want on the days in between), though this is hard to maintain too and I have never heard of humans voluntarily sticking to this alternate-day fasting plan.

In general, fasting has mixed benefits. One unpleasant side-effect is a lowering of metabolism, which means that when you start eating normal again, you'll just gain weight more easily. Also, obese people are typically characterized by their low metabolisms, which means that by abusing fasting practices, you could lower your metabolism sufficiently to end up obese.
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Orbz
post Jun 22, 2007, 08:40 PM
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Is the metabolism lowering side effect a chronic or acute thing?

I ask because food tastes better after fasting, an effect of alliesthesia. Similarly animals have been shown to do this and they also 'value' drugs like heroin more during withdrawal, this is a learned effect. Could the obesity come not because of an acutely decreased metabolism but a long term increase in the value of food?
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Hey Hey
post Jun 23, 2007, 04:38 AM
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QUOTE(xanadu @ Jun 22, 2007, 08:47 PM) *
You seem to be posting (here and elsewhere) quite old references. Perhaps you could not simply post references that you come across when trawling the web, but look into the topics a little and then provide more up-to-date details to begin a discusson.
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xanadu
post Jun 23, 2007, 11:22 AM
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http://www.longevitymeme.org/topics/calorie_restriction.cfm

Hot Topic: Calorie Restriction

Calorie restriction (CR) is a strategy - a lifestyle choice when practiced by humans - proven to extend healthy and maximum life span in rodents and primates. Some animal studies conducted over the past 20 years have shown up to a 40% increase in maximum life span. CR also provides numerous secondary health benefits, such as a greatly lowered risk for most degenerative conditions of aging. Recent studies have demonstrated these same secondary health benefits in humans. Many researchers believe the evidence to date shows the practice of CR will extend the healthy human life span, but consensus has not yet been reached on this topic.

Calorie Restriction in a Nutshell
A calorie restriction diet aims to reduce your intake of calories to a level 20-40% lower than is typical, while still obtaining all the necessary nutrients and vitamins. CR is also known as CRON, for "calorie restriction with optimal nutrition." Mild CR may be as easy as adopting a much healthier diet, taking a few supplements and not eating snacks.

The degree to which CR can extend the healthy human life span is open to debate - and is the subject of vigorous discussion within the scientific community - but the evidence for at least some healthy life extension is compelling. A sampler of articles from the past few years illustrates this point:

The beneficial effects of CR in laboratory animals have been known for a long time, but only in the past decade - and in particular over the past few years - has more funding and effort been devoted to this field. In the present day, human studies such as CALERIE are underway and many research groups are digging into the biochemistry that could explain how and why CR is so good for health and longevity.

The genes and processes that control metabolism are notoriously complex, and scientists do not yet have a complete understanding of the way in which CR fits into the overall picture. But they are working on it.
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Orbz
post Sep 19, 2007, 09:07 PM
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Calorie restriction in nonhuman primates: assessing effects on brain and behavioral aging

D.K. Ingrama, J. Youngc and J.A. Mattisona
Neuroscience: Volume 145, Issue 4, 14 April 2007, Pages 1359-1364

QUOTE

Dietary caloric restriction (CR) is the only intervention repeatedly demonstrated to retard the onset and incidence of age-related diseases, maintain function, and extend both lifespan and health span in mammals, including brain and behavioral function. In 70 years of study, such beneficial effects have been demonstrated in rodents and lower animals. Recent results emerging from ongoing studies of CR in humans and nonhuman primates suggest that many of the same anti-disease and anti-aging benefits observed in rodent studies may be applicable to long-lived species. Results of studies in rhesus monkeys indicate that CR animals (30% less than controls) are healthier than fully-fed counterparts based on reduced incidence of various diseases, exhibit significantly better indices of predisposition to disease and may be aging at a slower rate based on analysis of selected indices of aging. The current review discusses approaches taken in studies of rhesus monkeys to analyze age-related changes in brain and behavioral function and the impact of CR on these changes. Approaches include analyses of gross and fine locomotor performance as well as brain imaging. In a related study it was observed that short-term CR (6 months) in adult rhesus monkeys can provide protection against a neurotoxic insult. Increasing interest in the CR paradigm will expand its role in demonstrating how nutrition can modulate the rate of aging and the mechanisms responsible for this modulation.
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Enki
post Sep 28, 2007, 10:00 AM
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I think for each man diet should be separately considered depending on many factors.
It cannot be a rule of thumb!

I think 30% restriction is a wrong approach.
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Rick
post Sep 28, 2007, 12:02 PM
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Calorie restriction brings lethargy (low energy level). I would rather lead an active and energetic life than a long and dismal one.
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Enki
post Sep 28, 2007, 09:18 PM
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Keep Golden Middle.
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Orbz
post Sep 29, 2007, 10:07 PM
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QUOTE(Rick @ Sep 29, 2007, 04:02 AM) *

Calorie restriction brings lethargy (low energy level). I would rather lead an active and energetic life than a long and dismal one.

When I don't restrict my calories, I get tired, lethargic and need an afternoon nap. This has caused me to eat lighter and less during the day so I don't have the after food satiation crash.

QUOTE
Keep Golden Middle.
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Rick
post Oct 01, 2007, 11:47 AM
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It's true that a certain amount of hunger is energizing. "Stay Hungry" is the title of Arnold Schwartzennegger's first book. Body builders are extremists in their own way.
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Enki
post Oct 02, 2007, 07:11 AM
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QUOTE(Rick @ Oct 01, 2007, 11:47 AM) *

It's true that a certain amount of hunger is energizing. "Stay Hungry" is the title of Arnold Schwartzennegger's first book. Body builders are extremists in their own way.


One should come out of a table with some small sense of hunger. I do not follow that rule myself, but it is very good advise. It really helps to remain active and productive.
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Rick
post Oct 02, 2007, 10:38 AM
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It's interesting to receive advice from those who do not follow it themselves.
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Enki
post Oct 02, 2007, 11:24 AM
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I am sorry, gluttony is one of my shortcomings.
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Guest
post Oct 02, 2008, 08:11 AM
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[/quote]

One should come out of a table with some small sense of hunger. .
[/quote]

According to this book "Obesity spots ageing and wrinkles: Are you losing your war against free radicals?"

The positive effect of calorie restriction is not related to the calorie restriction but to the Methionine restriction.

Therefore what we should do (well what I do) is to keep the quantity of Methionine in my diet as low as possible and I keep the quantity of calories high enough to feel good.
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Mat
post Oct 02, 2008, 08:37 AM
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[quote name='Guest' date='Oct 02, 2008, 08:11 AM' post='93128']
[/quote]

According to this book "Obesity spots ageing and wrinkles: Are you losing your war against free radicals?"

[/quote]


well I read that book to solve my erection problem cased by caloric restriction ops!!!!
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julia
post Jul 20, 2010, 08:28 PM
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If you are very serious about your health. then you must have your calories chart as per your work so from that calories chart you can know how to take your food.
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Hey Hey
post Jul 21, 2010, 11:23 AM
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QUOTE(julia @ Jul 21, 2010, 05:28 AM) *

If you are very serious about your health. then you must have your calories chart as per your work so from that calories chart you can know how to take your food.
Good suggestion. Makes sense to base your own calorific intake on your individual energy requirements.
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Rick
post Jul 21, 2010, 12:35 PM
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What happened to "eat when you're hungry, sleep when you're tired"?
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Hey Hey
post Jul 21, 2010, 03:26 PM
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QUOTE(Rick @ Jul 21, 2010, 09:35 PM) *

What happened to "eat when you're hungry, sleep when you're tired"?
Some jobs just don't let you go with the flow.
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bbbb
post Jul 21, 2010, 06:41 PM
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If you are very serious about your health. then you must have your calories chart as per your work so from that calories chart you can know how to take your food.
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Hey Hey
post Jul 21, 2010, 08:12 PM
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Is there an echo in here? Or is it an Enkio?
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julia
post Aug 01, 2010, 07:30 PM
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There are readymad calories chart Available on the Inernet If you are very serious about your health. then you must have your calories chart as per your work so from that calories chart you can know how to take your food.You have to select as per you workout there are 3 kind of work normal hard nothing as per this category you have to take your food.
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AnneStaley
post Jun 08, 2012, 10:30 PM
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Excellently amazing... Hats off to your creativity man…this is a world-class write-up which I think should be read by every citizen of the world. I am happy that at least somebody gave this subject an attention. People should understand its importance as well…
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Banlos32
post Jun 05, 2013, 08:48 AM
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Having calories in moderation can defiantly help in being physically well because what i feel is its a very fine way to lose weight or keeping yourself into the shape.
Making things a part of diet which can be the reason behind getting the appropriate amount of calories is a healthy thing.
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matthewebbert
post Aug 07, 2013, 01:51 PM
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Research suggests that longevity can be achieved through calorie restriction, if caloric restriction is to be a feasible strategy for maintaining health as we age it has to be feasible to implement
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Goarge William
post Mar 09, 2015, 03:56 AM
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It's true that healthy diet leads your healthy body, If you want to maintain your health and stay healthy then you must eat a healthy diet and take some exercises.
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Jhon Carter
post Apr 02, 2015, 09:43 PM
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Its true that calorie restriction give health but you should never stop the intake of calories. They are fat but at the other hand they are necessary for us to perform all buy functions properly. Hence reduce the intake of calories but never stop consuming them. Thanks.!!
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David.Brown
post Apr 14, 2015, 05:20 AM
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Yes it is true calories reduction can give you health.

:

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