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> Semantic Novelty in Hippocampus
noimchompski
post May 30, 2006, 10:31 AM
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So we have cells and fMRI studies that show novelty recognition of spatial information in the hippocampus (in rats and humans)

is there such knowledge about semantic novelty in humans?

such as... "i just read you a sentence. is it the same as the target sentence, yes or no?"
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Steppenwolf
post May 30, 2006, 11:58 AM
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Novelty effect is not a brain process per se; the hippocampus and the medial temporal cortex do get activated during the storage of new episodic information. For a word or a sentence, the hippocampal activation may be minimal, where the main memory incoding is being subserved by surrounding cortex.
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noimchompski
post Jun 01, 2006, 10:07 AM
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see, i want to disagree because the mechanism exists directly in the hippocampus for things such a spatial novelty recognition (you can test for novel maze in same room or same maze in novel room and get a dichotomy of results using test subjects with lidocaine injectison to the hippocampus v. mtl v amygdala)


know what im sayin?
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Steppenwolf
post Jun 02, 2006, 05:53 AM
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The effect you're talking about is in relation to learning the new code, and is not seen as sensory stream indicating novelty. The emotional focus on novel, potentially rewarding information, may modulate our perception in a relatively consistant way, and eventually leading to this 'feeling' of novelty. What I'm saying is that all potentially rewarding information is treated preferentially by the cortex in a varying degree.
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lucid_dream
post Jun 02, 2006, 08:00 AM
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I thought novelty preferentially effected the prefrontal cortex
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Rick
post Jun 02, 2006, 09:50 AM
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Slightly tangentially:

The hippocampus is needed for long term memory formation. I suppose that if one had a novel experience and the hippocampus were impaired, he wouldn't remember the novelty. Because every long term memory must first be conscious, the hippocampus is also related (in this way) to consciousness.
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