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> Cranial Electrical Stimulation, Stimulates those neurons!
Onfire
post May 16, 2006, 07:17 AM
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Its in stock for only $295



Cranial Electrical Stimulation (CES) is basically two electrical prods that go on each ear and is performed for about 20 minutes a week. CES supercharges your nootropics stack, synergizes your neurotransmitters, and increases brain hemisphere coherence electronically.

The CES Ultra has two electrical configurations with two different frequencies: 100 Hz and 0.35 Hz. They are set using a dipswitch in the battery compartment. The frequency of choice is the 100 Hz which has the largest body of evidence as to efficacy behind it. It provides a gentle and calming tingling sensation, though it may also be used below the sensate threshold. The 0.35 Hz setting operates at a lesser amplitude, generating very little actual sensation, but with a more subtle impact. The user may pre-set the time for either configuration for 30 minutes or 45 minutes, at which point the current will automatically turn off, or to have the unit run continuously.

Frequency: 100 Hz
Power source: 9V alkaline battery
Wave Shape: Square
Amplitude: Adjustable from 0-1.5 Ma
Pulse Duration: 2 milliseconds (20% duty cycle)

Frequency: 0.35Hz (modulated by varying signals)
Power source: 9V alkaline battery
Wave Shape: Square
Amplitude: Adjustable from 70-750 microamperes

WHAT IS CRANIAL ELECTROTHERAPY STIMULATION?
From The Townsend Letter for Doctors, June 1993

Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation (CES) is the application of low-level pulsed electrical currents (usually less than 1 milliampere) applied to the head for medical and/or psychological purposes. There is now over 20 years of medical experience with CES in America. Presently, its use requires a prescription by a licensed health practitioner in the United States. It is available without a prescription throughout the rest of the world.

Cranial electrotherapy stimulation has also been known by many other names. Transcranial electrotherapy (TCET), neuroelectric therapy (NET), alpha sleep, electroanalgesia, electronarcosis and the original electrosleep just a few of the more common terms that have referred to the same therapy.

Cranial electrotherapy stimulation was first called electrosleep because it was thought to induce sleep. Rabinovich, a Russian, is given credit for making the first claim for electrical treatment of insomnia in 1914. In 1957, in the U.S.S.R., Anan'ev published the first paper on CES. The first book, simply titled Electrosleep, was published a year later by Gilyarovski. This generated a high degree of interest in the then-known Eastern Block countries and CES was soon adopted as a treatment modality. In 1959, Obrosow reviewed the CES literature and published the first American paper on CES. By 1966 the first International Symposium on Electrotherapeutic Sleep and Electroanesthesia was held in Austria. The use of CES had spread worldwide by the late 1960's when animal studies of CES began in the U.S. at the University of Tennessee, and at what is now the University of Wisconsin Medical School. These were soon followed by human clinical trials at the University of Texas Medical School in San Antonio, the University of Mississippi Student Counseling Center and the University of Wisconsin Medical School. .

The most comprehensive review of the research in CES published to date is a chapter by Ray B. Smith, Ph.D. in the book, Neural Stimulation, published in 1985. Dr. Smith has been researching CES since 1972. He concluded, "There are 40 studies of CES readily available in the U.S. in which the dependent variable is reliable. When these are examined alone it becomes apparent that CES is effective in alleviating symptoms of anxiety, depression, and insomnia...CES appears effective as a treatment for withdrawal in the chemically dependent person. Other promising areas of treatment are in hypergastric acidity and migraine headaches. Dr. Smith adds, CES appears to be safe, with no harm or negative side effects having been reported to date in controlled studies...Finally, while one usually assumes some placebo effect from a treatment as dramatic as this, none has been reported in studies controlled for this effect”. Scientists at Harvard have recently analyzed all the literature on CES worldwide, and have also found it to be an effective therapy although they are holding their findings confidential until their results are published. Open marketing of CES devices began in the 1970's in the U.S. for the treatment of anxiety, depression and insomnia. Several thousand Americans are treated with CES annually by thousands of doctors and it is estimated that more than 50,000 people in the U.S. own CES devices which have been prescribed for home use. No adverse effects or contraindications have been found from the use of CES, either in the U.S. or in other parts of the world. As with all electrical devices, caution is advised during pregnancy and for patients with a demand-type pacemaker. In addition, it is recommend that patients not operate complex machinery or drive automobiles during and shortly after a CES treatment.

In addition to the usual claims for anxiety, depression and insomnia, CES has been researched for many other conditions. Favorable results have been reported in the literature for labor, epilepsy, glossalgia, hypertension, spinal cord injuries, chronic pain, arthritis, cerebral atherosclerosis, eczema, dental pain, asthma, ischemic heart disease, stroke, motion sickness, digestive disorders as well as various addictive disorders including alcohol, heroin, cocaine, and marijuana abuse.

Since we know that pain is a complex process involving the brain, it makes sense to add CES to the treatment of most pain patients. In fact, in many cases it is all that is needed to produce significant long-term pain relief.

Cranial electrotherapy stimulation is believed to stimulate the production of endorphins. It probably also affects the hypothalamus causing changes in the hypothalamic neurohormonal regulatory mechanisms and the reticular formation of the brain stem. The reticular activating system is involved in a myriad of behavioral expressions from alertness to sleep. This “attentional center" plays an important integrative role in the functioning of mind and body.

Cranial electrotherapy stimulation devices are generally similar in size and appearance to standard transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulators (TENS), but produce very different waveforms. Standard milliampere-current TENS devices must never be applied transcranially. CES electrodes can be placed bitemporally, bilaterally in the hollow behind the ears just anterior to the mastoid processes, or clipped to the earlobes. This depends on the device being used. Most CES devices produce a pulse repetition rate (PRR) of 100 Hertz(Hz) which was what the original Russian devices used. Some produce a PRR as low as 0.5, or as high as 15,000 Hz. The current is usually increased by the patient until a mild tingling sensation is felt at the electrode site, or a slight vertigo (dizziness) is experienced. It is then adjusted back down to a comfortable level below that which produces vertigo or an unpleasant feeling of electrical current. It may take a few minutes before the current needs to be reduced. Generally, a treatment time of 20 to 40 minutes is best, daily or every other day.

Immediately after a CES treatment, patients usually report feeling more relaxed. Some people feel somewhat inebriated for the first few minutes. This is a pleasant and very comfortable sensation. After several minutes to hours, the light-headed feelings usually disappear, the relaxed state remains and a profound sense of alertness is achieved. This relaxed/alert state will usually remain for an average of 12 to 72 hours after the first few treatments and then becomes cumulative from a series of treatments. Most patients relate feeling more relaxed, less distressed, while their minds remain alert and even more focused on mental tasks. They generally sleep better and report improved concentration along with heightened states of general well-being.
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code buttons
post May 16, 2006, 08:01 AM
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Cool: lobatomy on-the-go! I hope they carry them at my local Mac Donalds!

P.S. Welcome, Onfire, thanks for the cool posts.
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maximus242
post May 16, 2006, 10:58 AM
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CES is old technology, it has harmful side-effects and can be quite dangerous if improperly used. TMS is newer and safer, it is essentially the replacement for CES and TES, TMS has better results without the harmful side-effects, it is however much more expensive.
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OnlyNow
post May 17, 2006, 11:11 AM
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QUOTE(code buttons @ May 16, 11:01 AM) *

Cool: lobatomy on-the-go! I hope they carry them at my local Mac Donalds!

That's just silly, CB!

You have to go to Lobotomies "Я" Us for that.
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maximus242
post May 17, 2006, 11:14 AM
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lol, no thats the old one, they changed it to Lobotomy Mart.
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Five
post Jul 19, 2006, 01:23 PM
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Actually you can buy CES devices at many sites without a prescription.

I have not heard of any bad side effects from them.
Max, do you have references for this?

There seems to be only one Magnetic device listed on www.cerebrex.com
They are calling the Electric Lodestone.
There is an article on the Magnetic units that site bad side effects. They seem to send a lot more power to the brain, the the small CES units.

Tools for wellness carries Bob Beck's (Sota Instruments) Magnetic Pulser which also seems to be widly available without a prescription.
Likewise TENS units and EMS units can be gotten without a prescription.
If you go to a site that has the word "med" anywhere in the name, they will ask for a prescription for any of these units.

I was hoping to find a forum where folks have acutally used them and are telling the results they have gotten.

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maximus242
post Jul 19, 2006, 05:46 PM
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Refrences? yeah I do but most of them are in paper form in books about the subject, not on the internet.

Cranial Electric Stimulation is dangerous, the side effects range from mild to extreme, here are some examples, by the way there are various forms of CES, effects that occur in one CES can be diffrent in another, depending on the clinical application, some are more intensive than others:

-Stinging Pain from the electrodes not being properly in place
-Faulty wiring causing electric shock
-At the more Clinical level of application, extreme psychosomatic reprocussions for years including paranioa, fear, overall obidence to everyone and everything.
-Some CES are so powerful that they force the brain into immediate shock where the entire body shuts down for several hours, upon awakening extremely violent headaches and general feelings of pain surrounding the brain follow for about four hours.
-Many former CES patients described it as torture and several lawsuits have been placed.

Their is quite a bit more, CES is like from the 60's, they were testing it in Korea to, I actually got to read a full report of the findings, most were rather disgusting. CES is really outdated, very crude and even more dangerous if you do it yourself because you have not had professional training or have someone to assist you, should anything go wrong. Honestly, the lower power ones arnt as bad, but I would advise against them, its your own choice however I suggest you figure out what your trying to do with it before you go out and use it.
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Five
post Jul 25, 2006, 11:23 AM
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Thanks for the reply. Do you remember what books you got this info from?

I have been looking at the BT7 Bio Tuner by Bob Beck. It seems to be a popular item, and lots of folks at curezone.com have commented on it, but none of them are reporting anything extraordinary.

I think many of those older units used a lot of power.
Bob Becker (not same as Beck) in Crosscurrents (1990) reported on an electronic accupuncture unit which was strong enough to cause muscle contraction. They don't make them that strong anymore. They are down to micro current, and low HZ. They are adjustable so that you turn it down if you feel burning.

Those folks at curezone may not be too savvy. I was hoping to find someone who could report on any Lucid
Dream, or noticeable enhanced creativity.

Microcurrents also kill bacteria and viruses, so was looking for someone who would have noticed that they didn't have xx condition anymore.
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maximus242
post Jul 25, 2006, 05:34 PM
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If your going for Lucid Dreaming, ask life mirage about some drug induced methods, buy some Lucid Dreaming googles or the easiest way, induce Lucid Dreaming as a subconcious suggestion before you go to sleep.
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Lummar
post Aug 02, 2006, 12:22 PM
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I'm well versed in the use of CES. I own a Health Pax, which is the unit the Ultra replaced. It has 0.5hz and 100hz and was a clone of the Alpha-Stim 100 (Alpha-Stim forced Health Pax to drop the 0.5hz and that effectively sunk them). I also own a BT-7, which modulates at 111hz. The BT-7 differs in that it's less expensive ($175) and it has a much more powerful output.

You're right, they do increase the efficacy of smart drugs and the like. I would suggest to anyone here to look into using a CES device, it's a great little tool.

Also, for those with severe cognitive deficiencies, like ADD, I would suggest you look into a DAVID PAL light and sound device. The unit has several beta enhancing program settings and one particular setting that was used in the ADD study published in the Journal of Neurotherapy. It works wonders, if used on a daily basis, and can either reduce the need for drugs like Adderall or completely eliminate the need. I use mine along with Picamolin and the combo is excellent.

-Lummar
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Lummar
post Aug 02, 2006, 12:33 PM
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QUOTE(maximus242 @ May 16, 02:58 PM) *

Cranial Electric Stimulation is dangerous, the side effects range from mild to extreme, here are some examples, by the way there are various forms of CES, effects that occur in one CES can be diffrent in another, depending on the clinical application, some are more intensive than others:

-Stinging Pain from the electrodes not being properly in place
-Faulty wiring causing electric shock
-At the more Clinical level of application, extreme psychosomatic reprocussions for years including paranioa, fear, overall obidence to everyone and everything.
-Some CES are so powerful that they force the brain into immediate shock where the entire body shuts down for several hours, upon awakening extremely violent headaches and general feelings of pain surrounding the brain follow for about four hours.
-Many former CES patients described it as torture and several lawsuits have been placed.

Their is quite a bit more, CES is like from the 60's, they were testing it in Korea to, I actually got to read a full report of the findings, most were rather disgusting. CES is really outdated, very crude and even more dangerous if you do it yourself because you have not had professional training or have someone to assist you, should anything go wrong. Honestly, the lower power ones arnt as bad, but I would advise against them, its your own choice however I suggest you figure out what your trying to do with it before you go out and use it.


You have no idea what you're talking about, do you? Perhaps you're confusing CES with something else? CES has a perfect safety record and the ONLY side effects are perhaps a slight headache, intense dreams (initially), and redness where the electrodes go. I've been using one for 11 years and have NEVER had a bad side effect. I've also chatted with many others who have NEVER reported a negative side effect, let alone a harmful one. Show me the data on this if you're so sure.

TMS may be more effective, but I doubt you'll see a portable home unit in quite some time.

Here check this link out for a true picture of CES, instead of what this bozo is saying:

http://www.elixa.com/CES/CESfaq.htm

-Lummar
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maximus242
post Aug 02, 2006, 03:33 PM
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Depends on the application, mild CES is fine but its still outdated. Their is also shock therapy that includes CES in their arsenal which has very bad side effects and is used to treat severe mental illness, I suggest you learn more before opening your mouth.
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Lummar
post Aug 03, 2006, 06:19 AM
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QUOTE(maximus242 @ Aug 02, 07:33 PM) *

Depends on the application, mild CES is fine but its still outdated. Their is also shock therapy that includes CES in their arsenal which has very bad side effects and is used to treat severe mental illness, I suggest you learn more before opening your mouth.


Well, in my experience CES and shock therapy are entirely two different things. Generally, CES is regarded as a mild form of stim with electro-currents that are similar to our own brainwaves in intensity. Shock therapy is not good and I would never condone the use of it.

Perhaps CES is outdated, but so are SSRI's and most medications. Although, a good CES unit like the Alpha-Stim does work at alleviating anxiety and does considerably lower depression symptoms. I paid $200 for my Alpha-Stim 100 clone and it works wonders on anxiety and depression. Not bad for the price.

-Lummar
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fazzaz
post Aug 19, 2006, 08:38 PM
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[quote name='Lummar' date='Aug 03, 09:19 AM' post='68287']
[/quote]
Perhaps CES is outdated, but so are SSRI's and most medications. Although, a good CES unit like the Alpha-Stim does work at alleviating anxiety and does considerably lower depression symptoms. I paid $200 for my Alpha-Stim 100 clone and it works wonders on anxiety and depression. Not bad for the price.

-Lummar
[/quote]

Where did you get your AS clone? Why do you think an AS is a good unit for anxiety and/or depression? I got a BT7 a few months back and felt it was too strong (tried only the default setting), so was re-looking at the AS (but pricey).

And, trying to figure out what the experiencial difference between AS's 100Hz and BT's 111Hz would be.

Some writings on the BT7 say modes #2 and #5 produce "relaxing Alpha waves", and some say default #1 and #3 are more relaxing. On a short bit of #1 I felt quite hyper and ungrounded. (I am not not recommending the BT7, just want to know how to use it and if it is the right one for me. It is very well designed.)

-fazzaz

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Hey Hey
post Aug 20, 2006, 05:30 AM
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QUOTE(Five @ Jul 25, 08:23 PM) *

Microcurrents also kill bacteria and viruses, so was looking for someone who would have noticed that they didn't have xx condition anymore.

A lot of provisos here. Google "dielectrophoresis" to see how you can electrocute bacteria and viruses (and eukaryotic cells) without death. This is not the same as interfering with activity, or harm, of course.
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Hey Hey
post Aug 20, 2006, 05:34 AM
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QUOTE(Lummar @ Aug 03, 03:19 PM) *

Perhaps CES is outdated, but so are SSRI's and most medications.

Wild statements such as this are of no help in this, or any, discussion.
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Lummar
post Oct 25, 2006, 05:46 AM
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QUOTE(Hey Hey @ Aug 20, 2006, 09:34 AM) *

QUOTE(Lummar @ Aug 03, 03:19 PM) *

Perhaps CES is outdated, but so are SSRI's and most medications.

Wild statements such as this are of no help in this, or any, discussion.



Hmm... I think if you do your research you'll find that SSRI's are just bad science. The brain is electric and to think we can trick the brain by skipping a step, then we are fooling ourselves. The SSRI phenomena is solely an extension of big business and money. The reason depression hasn't been cured is because we are practicing bad science with SSRI's and the like. Chemicals and medicine are not the answer folks. I suggest you read The Body Electric by Robert O. Becker.

As for CES, I do not think it's out of date at all. In fact, it's one of the best modalities for treating depression and anxiety. Another, and much newer modality, is called the pRoshi, which has been described as an agnostic approach to EEG neurofeedback. It treats and reorganizes the brainwaves, which is the real culprit in most mental declination and disorders.

http://www.metternet.com/modalities/re-edu...roshi_works.htm

-lummar
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cerebral
post Oct 25, 2006, 07:15 AM
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Lummar, SSRI's modulate electrical activity indirectly. The brain is also biochemical. To say that it's just electric is ignorant.
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maximus242
post Oct 25, 2006, 08:25 AM
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and generates magentic fields... truely a complex organism, no other object on earth uses more electric power than the human brain.
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Flex
post Oct 25, 2006, 01:27 PM
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QUOTE(maximus242 @ Oct 25, 2006, 09:25 AM) *

and generates magentic fields... truely a complex organism, no other object on earth uses more electric power than the human brain.


I find that hard to believe-- power=VA how many volts does the brain use on average and what is the average current? How many watt hours of electric power does the brain put out on a given day? And the fact that the brain generates magnetic fields is a given--any electronic device does, I think what makes the brain unique is the biochemical elements. As far as I know we have yet to introduce this idea into any mechanical device.
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Lummar
post Oct 27, 2006, 04:51 AM
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QUOTE(cerebral @ Oct 25, 2006, 11:15 AM) *

Lummar, SSRI's modulate electrical activity indirectly. The brain is also biochemical. To say that it's just electric is ignorant.



But take away the SSRI and there goes the effect.

Yes, the brain is biochemical. BUT chemicals are released through electrical means. The genesis of brain function is electricity. When a doctor declares someone dead it's because there is no longer brainwave activity.

All I'm saying is that the medical field is skipping a step and claiming to be working on a cure. If you don't correct the electrical fields, first and foremost, no cure will ever occur. It's just a bad scientific approach and clearly motivated by one thing... MONEY.
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maximus242
post Oct 27, 2006, 12:15 PM
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QUOTE(Flex @ Oct 25, 2006, 03:27 PM) *

QUOTE(maximus242 @ Oct 25, 2006, 09:25 AM) *

and generates magentic fields... truely a complex organism, no other object on earth uses more electric power than the human brain.


I find that hard to believe-- power=VA how many volts does the brain use on average and what is the average current? How many watt hours of electric power does the brain put out on a given day? And the fact that the brain generates magnetic fields is a given--any electronic device does, I think what makes the brain unique is the biochemical elements. As far as I know we have yet to introduce this idea into any mechanical device.


Back when they were experimenting with other possibilities of simulating a human brain besides using a computer, scientists looked into building billions of electronic neurons, linking them together and then you would have a hardwired human brain. The reason why they didnt do this is because the amount of power required to run this was trillions of watts. No computer on earth can even come minutely close to equaling the power of the human brain, the sub-conscious is capable of out-preforming any computer on earth. We have yet to make a computer that is powerful enough to equal a cats brain, let alone a humans. I am talking in terms of both processing power as well as the number of neurons, no one has ever reached one million neurons, it will be a long road for artificial intelligence. The magnetic fields the human brain simulates are not so simple as you make them seem, they vary in signal strength, resonance and frequency based on a number of factors that are both logistic and emotional. Further more it is possible for other magnetic fields to influence the ones generated by the brain and externally manipulate the biochemical elements within the brain.
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Flex
post Oct 27, 2006, 04:54 PM
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That is really amazing, yet I still find it hard to believe. I mean if 2000 calories is the typical intake for a day, it seems logical that the amount of energy required to power the brain would be less than 2000 calories...
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ullasmann
post Jan 13, 2007, 11:13 AM
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Hi All.

CES and various WetWare modalities ?

Check this web site here out ... World Wide Web ullasmann.eu

You may find it useful?

John-Alfred Ullasmann
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Hey Hey
post Jan 13, 2007, 02:03 PM
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QUOTE(ullasmann @ Jan 13, 2007, 07:13 PM) *

Hi All.

CES and various WetWare modalities ?

Check this web site here out ... World Wide Web ullasmann.eu

You may find it useful?

John-Alfred Ullasmann

Very interesting site. Thanks for the info.
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shelley
post Nov 24, 2007, 11:12 AM
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Where can I get the CES unit you are referring to? I am in the SF BAy area?
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dutch84
post Nov 30, 2007, 11:20 AM
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Did you hear about this one?

Rewiring the Brain
Thursday, Aug. 30, 2007 By JEFFREY KLUGER / CLEVELAND
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A lateral X-Ray of the head of a 38-year-old man shows two Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) leads with four electrodes attached to each implanted in the subcortical area of the brain called the thalamus. A little bit of current may calm the tremors of Parkinson�s disease, ease depression and epilepsy, and awaken those with terrible injuries.
Cleveland Clinic
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It's harder than you think to say hello to your mother--at least in terms of the work your brain has to do. A glimpse of Mom must first register on your occipital lobes as a pattern of light and shadow. From there it is relayed to your memory center, where it is identified by comparison with every other face you've ever seen. You must then summon the speech centers in your frontal lobes, which recruit your breath and muscles and at last allow you to utter the words Hi, Mom.
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The fact that recognizing and acknowledging a familiar person is such a complex thing made it all the more remarkable in early August when scientists announced that a 38-year-old man had managed to pull it off. The man, whose identity was withheld, had suffered severe brain damage in a 1999 mugging and spent the past eight years in the dark cognitive well that neuroscientists call a minimally conscious state. Improbably, however, he can now greet both his parents. He can identify objects, hold very brief conversations and watch movies, and he recently recited the first 16 words of the Pledge of Allegiance. "I told him to say the pledge, and he did," says neuropsychologist Joseph Giacino of the JFK Johnson Rehabilitation Institute and the New Jersey Neuroscience Institute. "I didn't have to cue him."

None of this is the stuff of functioning adulthood, but all of it is huge for a person who was never supposed to manage anything like it again. And all of it is a result of the growing therapeutic science of deep-brain stimulation (DBS). Doctors at the Cleveland Clinic inserted a pair of fine wires into the mugging victim's brain last year, threading them down to the thalamus, a deep, intact structure that could, in theory, jump- start the surviving circuits in the damaged cerebral cortex above. Very low current was sent through the wires, stimulating the thalamus, which indeed awakened the higher brain.

Using DBS in severely brain-damaged patients may be a brand-new breakthrough, but the technology has already proved itself as a treatment for the tremors of Parkinson's disease, is nearing Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and is in clinical trials as a therapy for depression. Studies suggest it could also help control symptoms of Alzheimer's disease, dystonia--or paralytic muscle rigidity--epilepsy and even some addictions. "DBS is like a pacemaker for the brain," says Cleveland Clinic neurosurgeon Ali Rezai, who performed the operation on the brain-damaged man. "We pinpoint the part that needs stimulation and provide it."

For something that counts as brain surgery, a DBS procedure can be a surprisingly relaxed thing. On a recent morning in Cleveland, Scott Stipp, 55, a businessman and Parkinson's patient, lies lightly sedated on an operating table while Rezai and a team of surgeons drill a hole about as large as a dime in the crown of his head. Rezai then threads a wire just 4 microns thick--or four-thousandths of a millimeter--into Stipp's brain. Guided in part by CT scans and in part by real-time readings of electrical activity that the probe encounters as it passes different neural structures, surgeons aim for the subthalamic nucleus (STN), an olive-size clump of tissue deep in the basal ganglia that helps govern motor control. For much of the morning, Stipp's right arm has been shaking violently enough to rock the table.

"Go ahead, tremor away," says Rezai. "We want to see where the STN is."

"No problem there," Stipp says, laughing.

When the probe hits home, Rezai asks Stipp to perform a few tasks. Can he touch his index fingers together? Raise a cup to his lips? Sign his name? Stipp can do none of it. Then Rezai sends a few volts through the wire. Stipp's tremors calm. His index fingers meet. He signs the paper. "It's been a long time since I did that," he says wonderingly.

It will be a bit of time before he's able to do it routinely. In a week he'll come back, and wires will be tunneled beneath his scalp, over his shoulder and to his chest, where a small pacemaker will be implanted. Three weeks later--after all possible brain swelling subsides--the power will be switched on, and the precise voltage needed to control his symptoms will be determined. Then it will simply be a matter of returning every few years for a battery change.

The Cleveland Clinic is one of 250 places in the U.S. that perform DBS for Parkinson's, and worldwide, close to 40,000 people have undergone the procedure. But the operation is by no means a cure. For one thing, it doesn't do much for end-stage Parkinson's symptoms like cripplingly bad posture and difficulty swallowing. More important, Parkinson's is a degenerative condition, which means that while DBS neutralizes tremors, the brain continues to deteriorate beneath the mask of the treatment. After a decade or so, electrical stimulation is not enough to contain the disease. Still, that's 10 relatively symptom-free years during which other treatments may become available.

The benefits of DBS would have a similar expiration date for a degenerative disease like Alzheimer's, but in the case of anxiety or mood disorders like OCD or depression, it could effectively serve as a cure. "People with OCD don't typically have a degenerative course of illness," says Dr. Ben Greenberg, a professor of psychiatry at the Brown University Medical School and the leader of the OCD work that led to the application for FDA approval. "They should thus get more disability-free years."

While OCD and depression patients would be required to exhaust all other remedies before opting for something as extreme as DBS, those suffering from traumatic brain injury have few such options. Right now, from 100,000 to 300,000 Americans have suffered sufficient brain trauma to be classified as minimally conscious--a number that is growing as soldiers wounded by shrapnel come home from Iraq. Twenty percent of minimally conscious patients recover well enough to return to the community and resume their lives. Others never do. Still others drift at the functional margins, needing just a boost to cross the line into self-sufficiency.

The 38-year-old mugging victim is nowhere near able to resume the life he had, but he has gone from minimal consciousness into what's known as a post-traumatic confusional state. What's more, he continues to improve even after the electrical stimulation is turned off, suggesting that the brain is recovering abilities on its own. "He'll potentially be able to perform self-care such as eating and brushing his hair," says Giacino, who, along with neurologist Nicholas Schiff of the Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City, was part of the team that conducted the surgery.

DBS does present ethical issues. Volunteers who receive the treatment for depression smile on the operating table as the voltage is turned up and frown as it's turned down, raising questions about just whose mind it is anyway. Advocates argue that when your life has come to ruin as a result of disability, you're concerned less with such philosophical questions than with simply feeling better. Trickier are the cases of brain-damaged patients on whom the operation is, by definition, performed without consent. Dr. Joseph Fins, medical ethicist at Weill Cornell and a principal researcher on the recent study, is untroubled by that, arguing that the very condition that eliminates the ability to consent is the one the surgery seeks to correct. His position is hard to challenge. A patient for whom the neural lights go on for the first time in eight years may react in a lot of ways, but he's unlikely to insist he should have been left in the dark.
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Hudzon
post Dec 04, 2007, 10:54 AM
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QUOTE

-At the more Clinical level of application, extreme psychosomatic reprocussions for years including paranioa, fear, overall obidence to everyone and everything.

I am aware of the first two, but the last one seems new to me. (Well, aside from the myriad of conspiracy theories about J. Delgado and the CIA, but I suppose I automatically dismissed those).

As I am doing some research on the topic right now, I would be very grateful if you could send me some reference.
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RKS
post Feb 15, 2008, 11:09 PM
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Hi,
I am working on an inexpensive Cranial Electric Stimulation device that allows the user to select the waveform and frequency (my favourite is grey noise). Not only can waveforms be selected, but they created and installed at will ~ well, perhaps it takes some computer savvy...

The device is battery operated (single AAA battery) and will cost around $50USD. I'm thinking of starting a discussion group to discuss the effect of the device and the various waveforms and to post waveforms they create themselves.

Could be fun, but I am not sure of the degree of interest in this particular area.

BTW the device would require no prescription and of course it can run Alpha Stim waves, BT-7 and any others you can dream up including decay waves (frequency changes over time) etc etc.

Let me know what you think.

RKS

BTW I'm looking for a good source of electrode gel ~ any ideas?
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BrainStim
post Feb 22, 2008, 02:10 PM
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Shows you how to make one of these devices at this site:

redcircuits.c*m/Page19.htm

QUOTE
Owing to the recent launching in Europe of Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation (CES) portable sets, we have been "Electronically Stimulated" in designing a similar circuit for the sake of Hobbyists. CES is the most popular technique for electrically boosting brain power, and has long been prescribed by doctors, mainly in the USA, for therapeutic reasons, including the treatment of anxiety, depression, insomnia, and chemical dependency. CES units generate an adjustable current (80 to 600 microAmperes) that flows through clips placed on the earlobes. The waveform of this device is a 400 milliseconds positive pulse followed by a negative one of the same duration, then a pause of 1.2 seconds. The main frequency is 0.5 Hz, i.e. a double pulse every 2 seconds. Some people report that this kind of minute specialized electrical impulses contributes to achieve a relaxed state that leaves the mind alert.
Obviously we can't claim or prove any therapeutic effectiveness for this device, but if you are interested in trying it, the circuit is so cheap and so simple to build that an attempt can be made with quite no harm.
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