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> L-Huperzine A, Acetylcholinesterase inhibitor
cerebral
post Mar 05, 2006, 09:22 PM
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Anyone have experience with Huperzine A?

According to uniquenutrition.net:
L-Huperzine A is a natural plant alkaloid (extracted from Huperzia serrata), which quickly and potently boosts memory, learning, and concentration. Used worldwide for decades in adults and high school students. Is considered the most potent short term memory enhancer available.

What's the best place to buy this?



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cerebral
post Mar 05, 2006, 09:28 PM
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Here's more info I found:

Huperzine Introduction

A Chinese medicine with use dating back hundreds (if not thousands) of years, healers have used the moss Huperzia serrata as part of their medical armamentarium. The moss is found in northern areas of China and has been employed as a fever and inflammation remedy. While some research backs up the historical applications of this medicinal moss, modern science has uncovered far more uses for this plant. More specifically, an alkaloid extract of the moss, known as huperzine A, has impressive effects on conditions involving the brain.

Huperzine A appears to work on areas of memory and can possibly benefit those with loss of short term memory; as well as in conditions of long term memory loss, such as Alzheimer’s disease. Other information relating to its usefulness in treating fevers and inflammation (historical uses) remain to be elucidated by modern research. However, given the wisdom of thousands of years of efficient usage, huperzine A may indeed be helpful for such conditions.



Huperzine Food Sources

Parts Used
The extract of the moss, huperzine A, is classified as an alkaloid chemical. Huperzine A is derived from two different types of Chinese club moss, Huperzia serrata and Lycopodium selago. [1]

Huperzine Uses
Huperzine A directly affects the concentration of a particular neurotransmitter in the brain known as acetylcholine. [2, 3] This medicine works by stopping or slowing the enzyme (acetylcholinesterase, AChE) responsible for breaking down this neurotransmitter for a specified period of time; hence it is known as a reversible acetylcholinesterase inhibitor.


Under normal conditions in the brain, acetylcholine is released and acts upon specific neurons. Once it has performed its function, the enzyme acetylcholinesterase comes along and ‘sweeps up’ the remaining acetylcholine. Huperzine A effectively slows this action, leaving acetylcholine around for longer periods of time. Scientists believe this may be the reason why Huperzine A has positive effects on certain brain conditions.

Huperzine A is thought to act on AChE for up to 3 hours, and may be more effective than certain pharmaceutical AChE inhibitors (i.e. tacrine, Cognex or donzepril, Aricept). [4, 5] In one particular study, huperzine A was shown to be 64 times more effective than one of these medications (tacrine), and to be better distributed in the brain than this drug. [1] In addition to working as well as commonly prescribed drugs, huperzine A can protect brain cells in certain conditions as well. For example, glutamate is an amino acid that can become toxic to brain cells when it reaches a certain concentration; huperzine A also protects against glutamate-induced neuronal damage. [4] Huperzine A is protective against another type of experimental neurotoxin, N-methyl-D-aspartate, or NMDA. [6, 7] Huperzine A is protective against certain seizure-inducing nerve agents as well. [8]

Areas where huperzine A excels also includes improving memory function in healthy individuals. In one study, highlighting school children that complained of poor memory, huperzine supplementation was shown to improve memory after only four weeks of supplmentation. [9]

In treatments of dementia, huperzine A supplementation has been shown to improve the memory, behavior, and cognitive function in people with Alzheimer’s disease, brain damage caused by strokes, and in the very elderly who suffer from senile-induced dementia. [10-12] In these studies, treatment times ranged from two to eight weeks of supplementation.

Another interesting area of success with huperzine A is within the treatment of the disease myasthenia gravis (MG). MG is an autoimmune condition in which acetylcholine receptors in the muscles are attacked by the person’s own immune system. By administering huperzine A, muscle weakness was delayed in MG patients who received the medicine by intramuscular injection. [1] Compared to neostigmine, a commonly used drug for this condition, huperzine A had a longer duration of effect.


Huperzine Dosages


Taken orally, huperzine A is dosed from 50 micrograms to 200 micrograms, twice per day. Studies investigating its intramuscular use utilized 400 micrograms per day.


Huperzine Toxicities and Contraindications

Huperzine Side effects:
Some reported side effects of huperzine A supplementation include blurry vision, sweating, nausea, loss of appetite, muscle twitching, and insomnia. [13, 14]


Conditions in which huperzine A may be contraindicated include pregnancy and lactation; no studies have been performed regarding its safety, however. Other conditions with potential reactions include; cardiovascular disease (huperzine can slow the heart rate), epilepsy (may worsen seizure disorders), ulcers (huperzine can enhance gastric juice secretion), asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (huperzine may increase lung secretions), and urinary tract obstructions (huperzine may increase secretions here as well).

Note: Huperzine A, although derived from a plant, is a constituent that has undergone laboratory modification. Avoid confusing prescription names of huperzine A (Cerebra, selagine) with similar-sounding prescription drugs (e.g. Celebrex, Celexa, Cerebyx and selegiline). [15]

General interactions (supplement, herb, food, lab):
Huperzine A does not appear to interfere with any other supplements, herbs, foods, or lab tests.

Huperzine Drug interactions:
Because of the apparent inhibitory effect of huperzine A on AChE, using it with acetylcholinesterase inhibitor drugs may lead to additive effects. This includes the drugs; tacrine (Cognex), succinylcholine (Anectine, Quelicin), echothiophate (Phospholine Iodide, bethanechol (Urecholine), donepezil (Aricept), edrophonium (Enoln, Reversol, Tensilon), neostigmine (Prostigmin), physostigmine (Antilirium), and pyridostigmine (Mestinon, Regonol).

Using huperzine A with anticholinergic drugs may decrease the effectiveness of huperzine A, as these drugs counter its effects on acetylcholine. Anticholinergic drugs include: scopolamine, atropine, biperiden (Akineton), benztropine (Cogentin), trihexyphenidyl (Artane), and procyclidine (Kemadrin).


Using huperzine A with cholinergic drugs (these promote the activity of acetylcholine in the body) may lead to additive effects. These drugs include; bethanechol (Urecholine), donepezil (Aricept), echothiophate (Phospholine Iodide), edrophonium (Enoln, Reversol, Tensilon), neostigmine (Prostigmin), physostigmine (Antilirium), pyridostigmine (Mestinon, Regonol), succinylcholine (Anectine, Quelicin), and tacrine (Cognex).

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LifeMirage
post Mar 05, 2006, 09:49 PM
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I've used and given Huperzine A to many people. For most it is one of the best nootropics that can make a rather noticeable impact on short-term memory. It also has been shown to affect Nerve Growth Factor and have some neuroprotective effects on the NMDA receptors.

It’s pretty safe unless you happen to be on other AChEI's or taking too much ACh precursors. Then the risk of nausea, headache, increased sweating, and/or salvia production can occur. It’s always a good idea to check with your healthcare provider before taking any supplements.

Several companies sell Huperzine A.


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Tone
post Mar 06, 2006, 05:23 PM
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Im not sure why but any nootropic ive tried has increased dysphoria. interestingly , many antidepressants are anticholinergic (which i dont care for either except for the effect my diphenhydramine sleeping pills have).

I guess im one of the unlucky ones that gets mental pain from nootropics and need something else like stablon or more opioid to prevent that reaction. it seems like it would be tricky to enhance both cholinergic pathways and sense of well-being
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cerebral
post Mar 11, 2006, 01:41 PM
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how much daily dosage is recommended for huperzine?
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LifeMirage
post Mar 11, 2006, 01:58 PM
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Depends on what other ACh compounds you are taking but usually 50-200mcg daily with meals.
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cerebral
post Mar 11, 2006, 02:01 PM
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I take wheat germ, which supposedly has high phosphatidyl choline amounts. I used to take choline bitartrate, but that has a low conversion rate to acetylcholine; I'm not currently taking that. I also take 500 mg Acetyl-l-carnitine (ALCAR) each day, which is supposed to increase synthesis of ACh when taken in conjunction with choline.

I was thinking about getting some huperzine from the store to try, but didn't know what daily dosage I should be looking at. I'll look for 50-200mcg capsules. Thanks.
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LifeMirage
post Mar 11, 2006, 02:07 PM
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QUOTE
I take wheat germ, which supposedly has high phosphatidyl choline amounts. I used to take choline bitartrate, but that has a low conversion rate to acetylcholine; I'm not currently taking that. I also take 500 mg Acetyl-l-carnitine (ALCAR) each day, which is supposed to increase synthesis of ACh when taken in conjunction with choline.

I was thinking about getting some huperzine from the store to try, but didn't know how what daily dosage I should be looking at.


PC is a very slow acting source of choline for ACh production. ALC does help increase Choline Acetyltransferase (the rate limiting enzyme that bonds Acetyl groups with choline to form ACh) and has a mild effect on the ACh receptors. But your dose is very low and the effects are not remarkably strong.

So i would suggest 100-200 mcg daily, as needed, or mon - fri.
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cerebral
post Mar 11, 2006, 02:10 PM
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is ALC just always pricey? I would take more but haven't found a good relatively cheap supplier.
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LifeMirage
post Mar 11, 2006, 02:14 PM
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Well there are several sources out there I take a 750 mg ALC 4 times day to get the full recommended dose. See Smart Drug suppliers list for a cost effective source.
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cerebral
post Mar 11, 2006, 04:04 PM
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I ended up getting some formula containing huperzine from GNC. There is a warning on the package not to take more than 100 mcg of huperzine per day. What are the effects of taking too much huperzine?

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LifeMirage
post Mar 11, 2006, 04:58 PM
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QUOTE
I ended up getting some formula containing huperzine from GNC. There is a warning on the package not to take more than 100 mcg of huperzine per day. What are the effects of taking too much huperzine?


If too much is taken nausea, headaches, dizziness is possible but rare when using the right dose. One study used up to 990 mcg [1] without apparent problems. A current US study is planning to use 800 mcg daily for the treatment of AD. [2] A study in high school students used 100 mcg daily. [3]


[1] Zhongguo Yao Li Xue Bao. 1995 Sep;16(5):396-8. Pharmacokinetics of tablet huperzine A in six volunteers.

[2]
http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct/gui/show/NCT00083590?order=1

[3] Zhongguo Yao Li Xue Bao. 1999 Jul;20(7):601-3. Huperzine-A capsules enhance memory and learning performance in 34 pairs of matched adolescent students.
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Pedro
post Apr 02, 2006, 09:44 PM
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i don't know if it's ok to say - i buy my huperzine and acetyl-l carnitine at very reasonable prices from swanson's on the web.
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LifeMirage
post Apr 02, 2006, 10:01 PM
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QUOTE
i don't know if it's ok to say - i buy my huperzine and acetyl-l carnitine at very reasonable prices from swanson's on the web.


Its a low dose but if it works stick with it.
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discintilldeath
post Jul 08, 2007, 06:35 PM
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Hey Lifemirage... if i play disc golf, which is a very mental game do you think using some form of Huperzine A would naturally help me with my focus and my mental game that constantly fall apart due to exhaustion, and also would it help the muscle memory part of my game and make me play better?
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LifeMirage
post Jul 08, 2007, 06:51 PM
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QUOTE(discintilldeath @ Jul 08, 2007, 09:35 PM) *
Hey Lifemirage... if i play disc golf, which is a very mental game do you think using some form of Huperzine A would naturally help me with my focus and my mental game that constantly fall apart due to exhaustion, and also would it help the muscle memory part of my game and make me play better?


Picamilon may be a better choice.
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Underman
post Mar 05, 2010, 12:16 PM
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ACHe is there for a reason. Inhibiting ACHe long term will basically give you mild brain damage, roughly equatable with excitotoxicity of high glutamate/NMDA doses, seratonin syndrome (or any toxic accumulation of molecules as a byproduct of inhibited metabolism). Also I'm not sure how much I trust the OP's study: roughly "Huperzine A also protects from damage by the experimental neuro toxin NMDA." Ok, NMDA isn't an "experimental neurotoxin". It's a receptor that you can't function without, and an amino acid that mimics glutamate (and can therefore be excitoxic just like glutamate can).

Huperzine A is an NMDA antagonist. You know what else is? Ethanol. Chronic administration of ethanol causes brain damage through precisely this pathway (not the only one however). So yes, it protects from excitoxicity, which you will pretty much only have if you have a stroke or a seizure, but it does this by inhibiting glutamate-affected signalling, which plays a major role in brain plasticity, learning and memory. The brain upregulates NMDA receptors in response to its antagonism, but this is not a good thing. Huperzine A will, over time, increase NMDA desensitization and kill your ability to learn information.

It is also a potassium antagonist. You know what else is? Lamictal, and I can tell you from personal experience that chronic lamictal administration absolutely destroys your memory. Don't take my word for it, look up K+ role in synaptic transmission.

Huperzine A is most likely not safe long term. Ache inhibitors are potent neurotoxins. I believe black widow poison is ache. Serin gas is an ache inhibitor. So taking highly purified huperzine A is not the same safe medicine that the Chinese use for short term administration (in far smaller doses) in traditional medicine. I'd be very careful, and evaluate how long I want to live a healthy lifestyle. ACHe inhibitors have been on the market for a long time, and they have a side effect profile to die for.
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shady
post Mar 18, 2010, 06:14 PM
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QUOTE(Underman @ Mar 05, 2010, 12:16 PM) *

ACHe is there for a reason. Inhibiting ACHe long term will basically give you mild brain damage, roughly equatable with excitotoxicity of high glutamate/NMDA doses, seratonin syndrome (or any toxic accumulation of molecules as a byproduct of inhibited metabolism). Also I'm not sure how much I trust the OP's study: roughly "Huperzine A also protects from damage by the experimental neuro toxin NMDA." Ok, NMDA isn't an "experimental neurotoxin". It's a receptor that you can't function without, and an amino acid that mimics glutamate (and can therefore be excitoxic just like glutamate can).

Huperzine A is an NMDA antagonist. You know what else is? Ethanol. Chronic administration of ethanol causes brain damage through precisely this pathway (not the only one however). So yes, it protects from excitoxicity, which you will pretty much only have if you have a stroke or a seizure, but it does this by inhibiting glutamate-affected signalling, which plays a major role in brain plasticity, learning and memory. The brain upregulates NMDA receptors in response to its antagonism, but this is not a good thing. Huperzine A will, over time, increase NMDA desensitization and kill your ability to learn information.

It is also a potassium antagonist. You know what else is? Lamictal, and I can tell you from personal experience that chronic lamictal administration absolutely destroys your memory. Don't take my word for it, look up K+ role in synaptic transmission.

Huperzine A is most likely not safe long term. Ache inhibitors are potent neurotoxins. I believe black widow poison is ache. Serin gas is an ache inhibitor. So taking highly purified huperzine A is not the same safe medicine that the Chinese use for short term administration (in far smaller doses) in traditional medicine. I'd be very careful, and evaluate how long I want to live a healthy lifestyle. ACHe inhibitors have been on the market for a long time, and they have a side effect profile to die for.


If they are such potent neurotoxins why do you see an improvement in the cognitive deficits of AD with ACHe inhibitors such as rivastigmine or donepizil? Note I said improvement in cognitive deficits not improved survival. Seems as though people with AD would be exceptionally sensitive to this supposed neurotoxic effect given the excessive degeneration of the basal nucleus of meynert, hippocampus, and cholinergic system in general in this population? Furthermore, memantine is an nmda antagonist which shows benefits in alzheimers patients. Accordingly, a current hypothesis of the pathophysiology of the disease involves glutamate induced excitotoxicity via the NMDA receptor. Yes, excessive ACHe inhibition is detrimental no doubt. But, I think you may be overestimating the effects of a couple hundred mcg of huperzine.
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thinker67
post Mar 27, 2010, 01:14 AM
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You wanted to know an inexpensive place to buy hup-A... try "lucky vitamin" online right now it is less than $6 for 60 200mcq or $11 for 120. The store in my town that sells it wants $23 for 90, so lucky vitamin is quite a bargain.

I am a caregiver for my mother who has Alzheimer's disease. Her neurologist is thrilled that she is taking huperzine. It is the same class of drug as Aricept, but lacks the side effects. She says that the only reason that huperzine is not FDA approved for Alzheimer's is that it triggers seizures in people who are prone to them. So please do not take this product if you are epileptic!

I experimented with effective dosage. She seems to do best with 2 pills in the morning. I take that dosage myself for cognitive enhancement and neuro-protection.
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cheekyleopard
post Mar 29, 2010, 12:29 AM
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For cheap supplements (including huperzine) i recommend Vitacost. Very cheap.
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Alexander
post Jan 20, 2012, 06:04 PM
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QUOTE(Underman @ Mar 05, 2010, 12:16 PM) *

ACHe is there for a reason. Inhibiting ACHe long term will basically give you mild brain damage, roughly equatable with excitotoxicity of high glutamate/NMDA doses, seratonin syndrome (or any toxic accumulation of molecules as a byproduct of inhibited metabolism). Also I'm not sure how much I trust the OP's study: roughly "Huperzine A also protects from damage by the experimental neuro toxin NMDA." Ok, NMDA isn't an "experimental neurotoxin". It's a receptor that you can't function without, and an amino acid that mimics glutamate (and can therefore be excitoxic just like glutamate can).

Huperzine A is an NMDA antagonist. You know what else is? Ethanol. Chronic administration of ethanol causes brain damage through precisely this pathway (not the only one however). So yes, it protects from excitoxicity, which you will pretty much only have if you have a stroke or a seizure, but it does this by inhibiting glutamate-affected signalling, which plays a major role in brain plasticity, learning and memory. The brain upregulates NMDA receptors in response to its antagonism, but this is not a good thing. Huperzine A will, over time, increase NMDA desensitization and kill your ability to learn information.

It is also a potassium antagonist. You know what else is? Lamictal, and I can tell you from personal experience that chronic lamictal administration absolutely destroys your memory. Don't take my word for it, look up K+ role in synaptic transmission.

Huperzine A is most likely not safe long term. Ache inhibitors are potent neurotoxins. I believe black widow poison is ache. Serin gas is an ache inhibitor. So taking highly purified huperzine A is not the same safe medicine that the Chinese use for short term administration (in far smaller doses) in traditional medicine. I'd be very careful, and evaluate how long I want to live a healthy lifestyle. ACHe inhibitors have been on the market for a long time, and they have a side effect profile to die for.



Black widow venom is not an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor; it stimulates production and release of acetylcholine.
"The best-studied latrotoxin is alpha-latrotoxin, which acts presynaptically to release neurotransmitters (including acetylcholine) from sensory and motor neurons"
The reason why Huperzine A can be therapeutic is because it binds reversibly to acetylcholinesterase, as opposed to poisons such as sarin gas which inactivate them permanently.
"Sarin acts on cholinesterase by forming a covalent bond with the particular serine residue at the active site. Fluoride is the leaving group, and the resulting phosphoester is robust but biologically inactive."

When it comes to the neurotoxicity of NMDA antagonists- this has been observed in rats only (in the form of Olney's lesions). An experiment was done on primates to see if these would form, and according to "the unpublished monkey data that we know about, that of Frank Sharp, [...] there is no damage at doses up to 10mg/kg." It is purported that we do not experience the same detriments that rats face because our brain metabolism works at about half the rate of rats'.

Lastly, lamictal is a sodium antagonist, not a potassium antagonist. As far as potassium antagonists go, the only side effect reported on wikipedia was Torsades de pointes- a rare form of ventricular tachychardia.

Forgive me if this was a terribly shallow investigation- I used Wikipedia for all of my sources after all. I would like anyone to correct me if I am mistaken on any of these points. The long-term usage of Huperzine A is something very interesting and potentially useful to me, and I need to know if it is something that could do me more harm than good in the long run.

I tried to post my sources but apparently I need to make more posts before I am allowed to do that. As I said before, however, everything I just said can be found on Wikipedia.
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trevdawg
post Jan 31, 2012, 11:27 PM
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Has anyone heard of Cerebral Success? i found it while looking for products with huperzine a but wasnt sure if its legit. looks like its got a lot of good ingredients. No racetums though
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Jakare
post Feb 02, 2012, 02:16 PM
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Overall it is just a mix of well known substances but it doesnt especify quantities so no way I am taking it without knowing exactly how much huperzine A plus Choline plus vinpocetine is going in to my system. Not to mention I have no idea how legit that company is and it would be advisable to get those components separately.
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sambocyn
post Feb 18, 2012, 09:26 PM
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to correct several factual and logical errors...

QUOTE(Underman @ Mar 05, 2010, 12:16 PM) *

ACHe is there for a reason. Inhibiting ACHe long term will basically give you mild brain damage, roughly equatable with excitotoxicity of high glutamate/NMDA doses, seratonin syndrome (or any toxic accumulation of molecules as a byproduct of inhibited metabolism)."


um, no. citations?

QUOTE(Underman @ Mar 05, 2010, 12:16 PM) *

Ok, NMDA isn't an "experimental neurotoxin".


yes it is. the NMDA receptor is a glutamate receptor subtype that selectively responds to the synthetic excitoxin. (wikipedia NMDA#Biological_function)

QUOTE(Underman @ Mar 05, 2010, 12:16 PM) *

Huperzine A is an NMDA antagonist."


true, the implications merit further research.

QUOTE(Underman @ Mar 05, 2010, 12:16 PM) *

The brain upregulates NMDA receptors in response to its antagonism, but this is not a good thing. Huperzine A will, over time, increase NMDA desensitization and kill your ability to learn information.

the two statements are inconsistent, i think. upregulation is a form of sensitization.

QUOTE(Underman @ Mar 05, 2010, 12:16 PM) *

Huperzine A is most likely not safe long term. Ache inhibitors are potent neurotoxins."


not all are. many are therapeutic, like huperzine a. (wikipedia AChEI#Examples)
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semi-retarded-individual
post Feb 25, 2012, 10:54 AM
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I'm somewhat familiar with LifeMirage's position on Hup A because I've been researching this substance extensively... however most of his posts supporting its use are from 2008. LM, has your view on Hup A changed at all? I know you say you've prescribed it to over 5,000 patients over the duration of your career as a MD. Do you still regard it as safe despite the warnings?

A user on Longecity put together a comprehensive post with sources concerning the dangers of Huperzine A use. I would link to it but because my post count is so low, I can't.

Search Longecity for the thread titled "AChEIs (Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors)/Huperzine A Dangers".

LM... are you still advocating its usage now the same way you did in 2008? Any new safety concerns?
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Jakare
post Feb 25, 2012, 03:02 PM
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QUOTE(semi-retarded-individual @ Feb 25, 2012, 07:54 PM) *

I'm somewhat familiar with LifeMirage's position on Hup A because I've been researching this substance extensively... however most of his posts supporting its use are from 2008. LM, has your view on Hup A changed at all? I know you say you've prescribed it to over 5,000 patients over the duration of your career as a MD. Do you still regard it as safe despite the warnings?

A user on Longecity put together a comprehensive post with sources concerning the dangers of Huperzine A use. I would link to it but because my post count is so low, I can't.

Search Longecity for the thread titled "AChEIs (Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors)/Huperzine A Dangers".

LM... are you still advocating its usage now the same way you did in 2008? Any new safety concerns?

Its been a while since last time LM posted here so I dont think you are getting an answer, at least a public one.
I am a usual lurker of Longecity and I linked that thread here in BM once at least. AChEIs are some of the most potent nootropics I have tried and because of that I pay them respect. For me they are a tool for special occasions and not a daily or chronic supp.
It would be really interesting to know LM response to your question but for me the dangers are there and are not meant to be ignored.
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semi-retarded-individual
post Feb 25, 2012, 03:56 PM
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QUOTE(Jakare @ Feb 25, 2012, 03:02 PM) *

QUOTE(semi-retarded-individual @ Feb 25, 2012, 07:54 PM) *

I'm somewhat familiar with LifeMirage's position on Hup A because I've been researching this substance extensively... however most of his posts supporting its use are from 2008. LM, has your view on Hup A changed at all? I know you say you've prescribed it to over 5,000 patients over the duration of your career as a MD. Do you still regard it as safe despite the warnings?

A user on Longecity put together a comprehensive post with sources concerning the dangers of Huperzine A use. I would link to it but because my post count is so low, I can't.

Search Longecity for the thread titled "AChEIs (Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors)/Huperzine A Dangers".

LM... are you still advocating its usage now the same way you did in 2008? Any new safety concerns?

Its been a while since last time LM posted here so I dont think you are getting an answer, at least a public one.
I am a usual lurker of Longecity and I linked that thread here in BM once at least. AChEIs are some of the most potent nootropics I have tried and because of that I pay them respect. For me they are a tool for special occasions and not a daily or chronic supp.
It would be really interesting to know LM response to your question but for me the dangers are there and are not meant to be ignored.


I appreciate your response. I think I will proceed with caution but I do intend to experiment with it. I suppose any detrimental effects won't be immediately perceptible. Instead of lurking at Longecity, you should register and contribute!

I didn't realize LM stopped posting around here. I thought he was a moderator? Isn't he duty-bound to respond to me? happy.gif

Is Galantamine any safer in this respect or does it pose the same threats being that it is also an AChEI?
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Jakare
post Feb 26, 2012, 03:35 AM
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QUOTE
I appreciate your response. I think I will proceed with caution but I do intend to experiment with it. I suppose any detrimental effects won't be immediately perceptible.

In such case maybe you would like to know green tea potentiate Hupezine effects:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19622237
And Alcar an hupezine compete to pass the BBB (Ok in rats) so maybe better not together:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22359054

QUOTE
Instead of lurking at Longecity, you should register and contribute!

Well to be honest I do intend to do so some day this year.

QUOTE

I didn't realize LM stopped posting around here. I thought he was a moderator? Isn't he duty-bound to respond to me? happy.gif

LM did some extensive work here but he couldnt scape the doubts about him or simply got bored and stopped posting. In these years his work has become dusty and outdated but is anyway a good reading for those who want to learn about nootropics and supps.


QUOTE
Is Galantamine any safer in this respect or does it pose the same threats being that it is also an AChEI?

Dont know, it has been prove to be safe in AD patients for 3 years:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22003296
Doses:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19358618
but I doubt the data can be extrapolated to young healthy individuals and doses should be a lot smaller. Young healthy subjects sure want to live in good conditions for more than a decade, dont we? Hey, but the data looks really good for AD patients.
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k_swift1
post Jun 10, 2012, 07:54 AM
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Originally got my 200 mcg from Cognitive Nutrition however having read some of the threads linked here: Titled - "I would contact the user lifemirage". Im tempted to throw it in the bin. Anyone recommend places to purchase L-Huperzine A?

Is 200mcg safe dosage?

Finally is there any concensus on the safety of Huperzine, particularly in the long term? Alot of the threads I have read (not just here) provide mostly anecdotal evidence. The main issue seems to be the fact that NMDA receptor antagonist (controls memory function) which on the face of it is contradictory to the benefits of Huperzine A unless Im missing something.

Thanks
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post Jun 10, 2012, 10:26 AM
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Dead ends, I tried Memantine. Something has to be specifically a selective AMPA Antagonist to make a person feel better. It looks like the reason why any NMDA antagonists have a little benefit and lot of side effects is because AMPA, another type of glutamate system, is also being antagonized by them to a much lessor extent since they are NMDA-selective. AMPA Antagonism, SSRE & Endorphin pathways are the only three mechanisms that can make a person feel well. All other pathways are either 1)mixed or 2) detrimental. GABA is mixed. Dopamine is mixed. Noradrenaline is mixed. NMDA is mixed between good and bad effects. Its SSRE, Mu & Blocking AMPA.

Murphy's Law...

AMPA Antagonist barely exist, Stablon is obscure, and Opioids are practically schedule I
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