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> My Antiaging-Cognitive Regimen, Overall Health Enhancement
LifeMirage
post Mar 16, 2006, 02:43 PM
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Cognitive Awareness. Expected to be published this year.
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noos
post Mar 16, 2006, 05:07 PM
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Good. Do you have the TOC?
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Kane
post Mar 20, 2006, 02:39 AM
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QUOTE(LifeMirage @ Mar 16, 02:43 PM) *

Cognitive Awareness. Expected to be published this year.


And the author will be?
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LifeMirage
post Mar 20, 2006, 08:19 AM
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QUOTE
Good. Do you have the TOC?


Yes but I won't post that online just yet


QUOTE
And the author will be?


Me...silly question.
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OnlyNow
post Aug 27, 2006, 05:20 PM
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Have you published your book yet, LM?

I've been looking over your regimen. It's very interesting, but the list is quite long and complex for someone new to this. Can I ask--If you were restricted to pick 5 to 10 of these supplements, which ones would you choose? I don't think I saw a multiple vitamin on your list. Don't you take basic multiple vitamins? I also didn't see Omega 3 on the list. You don't think we need it? Also, I have a few questions about the skin stuff--why both idebenone and ubiquinol? Isn't idebenone a synthetic version of a component of coenzyme Q10? If so, then wouldn't it be redundant to also use CoQ10? Is the prescription Prevage a whole lot better than the otc version? Can you tell me what Aminocare cream does for the skin? Also do you have an opinion on routinely using Retin-A? I've seen a whole lot of good stuff about it--that it builds up collagen and prevents wrinkles. But I've also heard that tretinoin might keep the skin in a constant state of inflammation (which ultimately ages it). I don't know if there's any truth to that. You probably don't focus on skin as much as, say, a fortysomething woman (without naming names). But the fact that you use certain skin products makes me think you've done your research. Thanks!!!
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LifeMirage
post Aug 28, 2006, 09:01 AM
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QUOTE
Have you published your book yet, LM?


Sigh. No with new research done daily and the full extent I would like to cover, my sundry projects (I'm working on creating monographs for 100's of drugs and supplements), articles, etc. I make have to wait another year.

QUOTE
I've been looking over your regimen. It's very interesting, but the list is quite long and complex for someone new to this. Can I ask--If you were restricted to pick 5 to 10 of these supplements, which ones would you choose?


An excellent multiple vitamin/mineral, a high quality EPA/DHA, R-Lipoic acid, Acetyl-L-Carnitine, L-Carnosine,

QUOTE
I don't think I saw a multiple vitamin on your list. Don't you take basic multiple vitamins?


I take both Ortho-Core by AOR and the Life Extension Mix by LEF. I take additional vitamins/minerals as needed.

QUOTE
I also didn't see Omega 3 on the list. You don't think we need it?


While I do get a fair amount of fish in my diet I do take epa/dha (omega 3's/fish oil). I believe everyone should consume fish and/or fish oil at least 3 times a week if not more.

QUOTE
Also, I have a few questions about the skin stuff--why both idebenone and ubiquinol?


Why not?

QUOTE
Isn't idebenone a synthetic version of a component of coenzyme Q10?


It is an analog of CoQ10 that while shares many properties has different effects.

QUOTE
If so, then wouldn't it be redundant to also use CoQ10?


No.

QUOTE
Is the prescription Prevage a whole lot better than the otc version?


Its somewhat better if you can afford it.

QUOTE
Can you tell me what Aminocare cream does for the skin?


For me it has increased my skin's moisture and elasticity. For more info:

http://www.naturalhealthconsult.com/Monographs/AminocareCream.html

QUOTE
Also do you have an opinion on routinely using Retin-A?


Never use by itself. Use it in very small dose 0.05%. Only 3-5 times a week max depending on your skin's state. I use it but did not list it. Time for an update.

QUOTE
I've seen a whole lot of good stuff about it--that it builds up collagen and prevents wrinkles. But I've also heard that tretinoin might keep the skin in a constant state of inflammation (which ultimately ages it). I don't know if there's any truth to that. You probably don't focus on skin as much as, say, a fortysomething woman (without naming names). But the fact that you use certain skin products makes me think you've done your research. Thanks!!!


My skin is pretty important to me so I do use a few select products I feel help make the difference. If you are considering using tretinoin be sure to use sunscreen and a good anti inflammatory serum (Idebenone, Carnosine, Lipoic acid).
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OnlyNow
post Aug 29, 2006, 05:54 AM
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LM--Thank you so much for taking the time to answer all my questions. I see you've updated your info. I'm going back to work this week, so I'll need all the memory enhancements I can remember to take. I'll definitely pick up some of the supplements you recommended. (Apparently, all things beginning with "carn" and ending with "ine" are good.)

Not to focus on my appearance or anything, but on the skin regimen--can you tell me your routine? (I assume you don't use all products at once). What do you think of peptides (ie, Olay Regenerist or copper peptides)? Also, what kind of sunscreen do you use?

TIA

PS--What's a monograph?
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LifeMirage
post Aug 29, 2006, 01:23 PM
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QUOTE
Not to focus on my appearance or anything, but on the skin regimen--can you tell me your routine? (I assume you don't use all products at once).


Honestly I use different ones daily depending on how my skin feels in the morning if that makes any sense.


QUOTE
What do you think of peptides (ie, Olay Regenerist or copper peptides)?


I think they have some benefit.


QUOTE
Also, what kind of sunscreen do you use?


I have a few i use. Solaris if i want to get a tan while protecting my skin, Otherwise LEF's TOTAL Sun Protection Cream. I also use LEF's Sun Protection Spray or LEP's Maui SolarMax (Rich Version) Spray at times.

QUOTE
PS--What's a monograph?


A technical article that goes into heavy details regarding a compound.

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Flex
post Oct 30, 2006, 12:39 PM
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How do you feel about DHEA, particularly at my age? Namely 7-keto.

Where would your recomend getting LEF mix. All online sources I have found are pretty expensive... Including buying from LEFs webpage. I would love to try the product, but for $100 a month I am a bit hesitant.

What are your feelings on Stevia--I cook with Stevia all the time to drastically reduce calorie consumption while avoiding artificial sweeteners. My personal opinion is that it is just more government BS and lobbyists trying to preserve wealth by requiring stevia to be labeled as a "dietary supplement".

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Lindsay
post Oct 30, 2006, 10:20 PM
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QUOTE(LifeMirage @ Aug 29, 2006, 01:23 PM) *
QUOTE
PS--What's a monograph?

A technical article that goes into heavy details regarding a compound.
LM, I just finished reading the posts in this thread. Very interesting information, you all! Thanks.

Talking about compounds: I came across this thread by Shawn, from way back in 2003. It about POTENTIALLY DANGEROUS SUPPLEMENTS: http://brainmeta.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=1958
How many are familiar with this list? Are there other compounds, which have come to the fore since then, which could be problematic? I am sure there are perhaps many even among prescribed drugs.

Interestingly, Shawn even mentioned an online source of supplements. Does this mean that it is okay for posters to say where we get our "secret", pocket-book friendly and healthy life-and-age enhancers? I do take several supplements which I will mention in another post. Though I am not adverse to taking prescribed drugs, when really needed, they--mostly in the form of herbs and enzymes--are the only "drugs". Should I mention where I get them? You can always send me a PM, if this is not allowed.

My health history: I was born in 1930, survived the depression, bad diet, several major childhood diseases, including rickets and diphtheria, was surrounded by relatives, several, including my mother, who died of TB--I was five--and other serious diseases.

Despite this, I was mostly healthy in high school and university. Once I got into my life's work I never lost one day, due to bad health, in over forty years.

Does this say something about the immune system? Who was it said: What does not kill you will make you stronger?

Check the next post.

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maximus242
post Oct 31, 2006, 01:58 PM
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Intresting that you say that Lindsay, I had a somewhat similar experience.

For three months without end I was sick on and off, on and off. At times I couldnt get out of bed for a month, eventually it finally stopped. But something was diffrent when it did, philosophically I had a whole diffrent outlook on sickness. The strange thing is, I havent been sick ever since that time, ive been out in minus ten with shorts on and not even gotten a sniffel. Its been over two years now and I have yet to take any medicine, see a doctor or even have a stuffy nose.
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Lindsay
post Oct 31, 2006, 03:09 PM
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Max, are there any research scientists with enough curiosity, and the resources, to do some reasearch on people like you, and me? If not, why not?

BTW, I have just up-dated my profile. To my interests I have added the following: Wouldn't it be nice if we all knew the best physical, mental and spiritual diet necessary for a full and abundant life. In addition, wouldn't it be nice if we were all made aware of the best way to die? That is, leave this three-dimensional universe, and move on to the next. Whatever it is.
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maximus242
post Oct 31, 2006, 05:08 PM
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Best way to die? Prehaps death and life in itself is an illusion and the only death we see is another stage of life.

Drug companies use powerful advertising manipulation to make people feel sick on rainy and cold days, when infact the only thing you can get from the cold is ammonia. So why is it when winter hits that their is this sudden spike in cold products being bought - even though there is no reason for more people to be sick. Infact, technically speaking sickness rates should drop in the winter and rise in the summer. I find the great majority of sickness is percieved rather than biological, the sub-conscious can influence single cells. So if your consciousness were to believe it is becoming sick, the sub-conscious could fufill that thought by actually making you sick.
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Flex
post Oct 31, 2006, 05:14 PM
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QUOTE(maximus242 @ Oct 31, 2006, 05:08 PM) *

Best way to die? Prehaps death and life in itself is an illusion and the only death we see is another stage of life.

Drug companies use powerful advertising manipulation to make people feel sick on rainy and cold days, when infact the only thing you can get from the cold is ammonia. So why is it when winter hits that their is this sudden spike in cold products being bought - even though there is no reason for more people to be sick. Infact, technically speaking sickness rates should drop in the winter and rise in the summer. I find the great majority of sickness is percieved rather than biological, the sub-conscious can influence single cells. So if your consciousness were to believe it is becoming sick, the sub-conscious could fufill that thought by actually making you sick.


Makes sense to me--maybe we all just suffer from media induced SAD (seasonally acquired depression, or seasonal affective disorder something like that )
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Lindsay
post Oct 31, 2006, 11:00 PM
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maximus242 and Flex, thanks for the feedback, posted Today,
QUOTE
Max: Best way to die? Prehaps death and life in itself is an illusion and the only death we see is another stage of life....Flex: Makes sense to me--maybe we all just suffer from media induced SAD (seasonally acquired depression, or seasonal affective disorder something like that )


Because of a life-long interest in holistic health, back in the 1960's I began giving a lecture series under the general heading "Pneumatology--a study of the spirit". As part of the series, which lasted until I retired in 1994, in my lectures I always made the following point: Pneumatology--about studing the spirit, scientifically--is not about rejecting the useful information from all the sciences, including psychology and somatology, it is about integrating them as components of the spirit.

PSYCHOLOGY, THE REBELLIOUS CHILD OF PNEUMATOLOGY? THE WORD WAS FIRST USED BY PHILIP MELANCHTHON--LUTHERAN, REFORMER, HUMANIST, SCHOLAR
http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/10151a.htm

The word 'psychology' was first coined by Philip Melanchton, a humanist and modest, Lutheran. From 1550 to 1590, when it was first used in print, it was used--probably in parallel with pneumatology--the study of the spirit--to refer to the study of the soul/mind. It is also probable that the conflict between pneumatology and psychology came later.
==================================
MORE ON THE HISTORY OF PSYCHOLOGY
http://www.yorku.ca/christo/
http://psychclassics.yorku.ca/Krstic/marulic.htm
==================================
Interestingly, at the time (1964) I had no idea that the word, pneumatology, was actually already in the larger dictionaries. One dictionary I consulted, later, defined it as, "a branch of metaphysical philosophy popular in the sixteenth century" and studied in the great universities. Actually, it was the term used by those interested in studying the nature and function of the mind, in the spiritual sense********, before 'psychology' was coined, and popularized by the materialists such as Wilhelm Wundt and William James. Wundt, the founder of experimental psycholgy Wundt, the son of a Lutheran pastor, is credited with setting up the first laboratory of psychology at the university of Leipzig, in 1879. His goal it seems was to separate psychology from philosophy/pneumatology and to establish it as a science.
It is reported that he and his father had differences of opinion about the nature of the mind and whether or not there is such a thing as the spirit apart from the mind/brain.

There are historians who say that William James should share the credit for being one of the first "psychologists". Unlike Wundt, who he respected, he was profoundly interested in metaphysics--even spiritualism.

THE STREAM OF CONSCIOUSNESS(1892)
by William James
http://www.ship.edu/%7Ecgboeree/jamesselection.html

Take note: Before James, CHARLES PIERCE (1839-1914) http://www.peirce.org/ played an important role laying the linguistic foundation for the study of psychology, for which he got little credit during his lifetime. It is saidn that it was Charles Peirce who took Kant's idea that we can never really know the truth -- that all our beliefs are maybes -- and turned it into the basis for pragmatism, which, later, James popularized..

INFORMATION ABOUT WUNDT AND JAMES
http://www.ship.edu/~cgboeree/wundtjames.html
http://www.indiana.edu/~intell/wundt.shtml
http://www.indiana.edu/~intell/periodIndex.shtml#gs

When his work became known, many North American students, interested in the new science of psychology, went to Leipzig to study under Wundt for their doctorates. He was

Because of this, Wundt's work--which was basically rooted in materialism and atheism--had a profound influence on the educational systems of all of North America from then on. It is probably the basis for much of the conflict between religion and faith in our universities over the last number of decades. By the way, Wundt was the son of an evangelical Lutheran minister with whom he was in conflict. Could it be that this conflict was a root cause of his rebellion against organized religion.

This poses an important question: In the light of the recent article in the Wall Street Journal and re-printed in the Globe and Mail, is the tide beginning to turn?
==========================================================
HAS ANYONE HEARD OF THE MACE METHOD?
http://www.lilliput-information.com/wundt.html
http://members.iinet.com.au/~identiks/index.html
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Flex
post Nov 01, 2006, 03:48 AM
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Another though--my common sense for the day. Winter=holidays, holidays=mass public gatherings in enclosed spaces i.e. malls. holidays also = family gatherings indoors. Not to mention kids at school no longer go outside for break because of the weather, adding to the spread of viruses etc.

The bottom line is that it is really common sense that in the winter people will be in close quarters with heaters circulating air. So unless these drug companies are behind Christmas, it is logical that the flu season is primarily cultural, and seasonal.

QUOTE
Infact, technically speaking sickness rates should drop in the winter and rise in the summer

Now I have a question... Are viruses effected by the weather? Since viruses are not a living organism it seems that they would not be, thus confirming the close quarters conclusion. I forget where exactly I read it, but I believe it was Paul Mahoney, who said that the protiens (I am assuming nucleic acids) will break down faster at room temp. than in the refridgerator. It seems like the cold weather would be better suited for preservation of viruses.
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LifeMirage
post Nov 01, 2006, 07:59 AM
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QUOTE
How do you feel about DHEA, particularly at my age? Namely 7-keto.


That would depend on your age. I would not recommend taking DHEA unless you're either over 35 or your DHEA-S levels are lower than ideal levels. 7-KETO I would like to see more research done but it seems reasonably safe.

QUOTE
Where would your recomend getting LEF mix. All online sources I have found are pretty expensive... Including buying from LEFs webpage. I would love to try the product, but for $100 a month I am a bit hesitant.


Pm me for source recommendations.

QUOTE
What are your feelings on Stevia--I cook with Stevia all the time to drastically reduce calorie consumption while avoiding artificial sweeteners. My personal opinion is that it is just more government BS and lobbyists trying to preserve wealth by requiring stevia to be labeled as a "dietary supplement".


Safer than sugar. Which is all that really matters.

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Flex
post Nov 02, 2006, 02:43 PM
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Two more quick question~ When taking vitamins and the likes is it alright to replace food with milk? I hate eating before 3:00 or so, but if I waited that long I would already be on my second round for the day. What are your feelings on NADH? I haven't found any reliable info on the subject. Would the effects be similar to CoQ10?
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Zoolander
post Nov 19, 2006, 11:36 PM
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LifeMirages programs is an advanced program that basically includes "the works" so to speak. I would add a few more to his program but do not know what his blood work looks like

Agreed or disagreed LifeMirage?.....

The best place to start for beginners would be a good multivitamin/mineral + Good supply of fish oil + (young) antioxidants and/or (older) anti-carcinogenics

On top of this focus on the diet and decrease environmental toxins i.e chemicals in food and grooming products

Once you have put together a strong basic program get some blood work done. From here you can personalize your program accordingly

for example: high cholesterol
consider supplementing with:
flush free niacin (inositol hexonicotinate, IHN), and
phytosterols/stanols

Phytosterols/stanols are also effective at lowering elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) levels

QUOTE
Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Oct;84(4):756-61.Click here to read

Reduced-calorie orange juice beverage with plant sterols lowers C-reactive protein concentrations and improves the lipid profile in human volunteers.

* Devaraj S,
* Autret BC,
* Jialal I.

Laboratory for Atherosclerosis and Metabolic Research and General Clinical Research Center, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA. sridevi.devaraj@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu

BACKGROUND: Dietary plant sterols effectively reduce LDL cholesterol when incorporated into fat matrices. We showed previously that supplementation with orange juice containing plant sterols (2 g/d) significantly reduced LDL cholesterol. Inflammation is pivotal in atherosclerosis. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), the prototypic marker of inflammation, is a cardiovascular disease risk marker; however, there is a paucity of data on the effect of plant sterols on CRP concentrations. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to examine whether plant sterols affect CRP concentrations and the lipoprotein profile when incorporated into a reduced-calorie (50 calories/240 mL) orange juice beverage. DESIGN: Seventy-two healthy subjects were randomly assigned to receive a reduced-calorie orange juice beverage either without (Placebo Bev) or with (1 g/240 mL; Sterol Bev) plant sterols twice a day with meals for 8 wk. Fasting blood was obtained at baseline and after 8 wk of Placebo Bev or Sterol Bev supplementation. RESULTS: Sterol Bev supplementation significantly reduced total cholesterol (5%; P < 0.01) and LDL cholesterol (9.4%; P < 0.001) compared with both baseline and Placebo Bev (P < 0.05). HDL cholesterol increased significantly with Sterol Bev (P < 0.02). No significant changes in triacylglycerol, glucose, or liver function tests were observed with Sterol Bev. Sterol Bev supplementation resulted in no significant change in vitamin E and carotenoid concentrations. Sterol Bev supplementation resulted in a significant reduction of CRP concentrations compared with baseline and Placebo Bev (median reduction: 12%; P < 0.005). CONCLUSION: Supplementation with a reduced-calorie orange juice beverage containing plant sterols is effective in reducing CRP and LDL cholesterol and could be incorporated into the dietary portion of therapeutic lifestyle changes.

PMID: 17023701 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


My point?

Well rather than taking the full monty, get some blood work done and personalize the program to maximize your health. It's probably the cheaper method as well

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lucid_dream
post Nov 20, 2006, 12:15 AM
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Resveratrol has received considerable media attention recently. Any recommendations, brand-wise? I know 100 mg or more per day is the suggested supplementation dosage.
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Zoolander
post Nov 20, 2006, 02:13 AM
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the biggest barrier with resveratrol supplementation is its bioavailability. Resveratrol is quickly glucoronidated into it's "in-active' metabolites. The current research is looking into whether these metabolites are active or not.

a great review from nature drug reveiws worth looking at

QUOTE
Nat Rev Drug Discov. 2006 Jun;5(6):493-506. Epub 2006 May 26.

Therapeutic potential of resveratrol: the in vivo evidence.

* Baur JA,
* Sinclair DA.

Paul F. Glenn Laboratories for the Biological Mechanisms of Aging, Harvard Medical School, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

Resveratrol, a constituent of red wine, has long been suspected to have cardioprotective effects. Interest in this compound has been renewed in recent years, first from its identification as a chemopreventive agent for skin cancer, and subsequently from reports that it activates sirtuin deacetylases and extends the lifespans of lower organisms. Despite scepticism concerning its bioavailability, a growing body of in vivo evidence indicates that resveratrol has protective effects in rodent models of stress and disease. Here, we provide a comprehensive and critical review of the in vivo data on resveratrol, and consider its potential as a therapeutic for humans.

PMID: 16732220 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Even though resveratrol is quickly glucuronidated into it's inactive metabolites the above paper/review states that only small amounts are needed to benefit health

message me if you are interested in the full article
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xanadu
post Nov 20, 2006, 11:37 AM
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All that "bioavailability" business overlooks the fact that benefits from resveratrol were first noticed in people who drank wine and ate grapes. The amounts ingested had to be no more than a few milligrams a day and were not in the form of extracts nor was it processed to make it more bioavailable. Despite those supposedly intractable barriers, people had much better health. One example of that is the "french paradox" in which they ate a fatty diet but did not have heart problems usually associated with that diet. It seems that the wine they drank did the job. Resveratrol levels in wine are variable and can be quite low yet they had good health. No 100 mg a day, just some wine and it did the job.

Hi Zoo
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Zoolander
post Nov 20, 2006, 09:30 PM
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Hi Xanadu.

I totally agree. I made a point in my last post re. the bioavailability of resveratrol but also commented towards the end about the small amounts needed to benefit health.

It's all in the paper I quoted which I will make available to anyone who wishes to read it. Just message me
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LifeMirage
post Nov 22, 2006, 03:08 AM
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QUOTE
Two more quick question~ When taking vitamins and the likes is it alright to replace food with milk? I hate eating before 3:00 or so, but if I waited that long I would already be on my second round for the day. What are your feelings on NADH? I haven't found any reliable info on the subject. Would the effects be similar to CoQ10?


As long as the milk contains fat.

NADH is interesting but I want to see more research before taking it on a regular basis.

Not quite.
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LifeMirage
post Nov 22, 2006, 03:14 AM
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QUOTE
LifeMirages programs is an advanced program that basically includes "the works" so to speak. I would add a few more to his program but do not know what his blood work looks like


The list posted here only contains some.....not all of the compounds i take daily, weekly or monthly. When i have time I will update it.


QUOTE
Agreed or disagreed LifeMirage?.....


My regimen is created specifically for me over years of regular blood testing and considering my dietary intake. My nutritional-pharmaceutical intervention is intended to provide both antiaging and cognitive health support at a rather extreme level.
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LifeMirage
post Nov 24, 2006, 10:51 AM
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Updated.
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Flex
post Nov 24, 2006, 11:29 AM
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Why no pasteurized foods? And why no microwave? That would eliminate like half of my diet...
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Zoolander
post Nov 25, 2006, 06:49 AM
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LifeMirage I noticed the following in your supplement regime

QUOTE
creatine 1gram


Do you load with creatine first? If so, how do you load? In an acute fashion or chronically over a month?

I have done extensive research with both creatine monohydrate and whey protein supplementation in aged males (60+ years) with and without resistance training. I should have several medical papers documenting my results published in the next 6 months.

I found with my research that it is important to make sure that the muscle is loaded correctly. Once loaded all that is needed to maintain the muscle loaded with creatine is to replace what is loast on a daily basis. The average daily loss of creatine is roughly 2 grams per day.

This brings me to my question.......is 1 grams per day of creatine adequate?

I do understand that you may not be taking creatine to increase basal PCr muscle stores. If so, what is the reasoning behind your creatine supplementation?
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Zoolander
post Nov 25, 2006, 07:07 AM
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Flex,

QUOTE
Why no pasteurized foods? And why no microwave? That would eliminate like half of my diet...


sometimes you need to make sacrifices matey. Maintaining optimal health and preserving what you have for as long as possible requires comittment.

If you're not prepared to make changes/sacrifices in your quest to achieve certain goals then you need to ask yourself

"How important are the goals"

Diet is just one approach though. Minimising your exposure to environment toxins is important as well. This is all outlined in LifeMirages program.

I'm not sure if this has been mentioned but LifeMirage also takes supplements that are adaptogens. These adaptogens such as ashwagandha work via hormesis. Hormesis is the term for generally-favorable biological responses to low exposures of stressors. Some supplements actively stress both the physiological and psychological systems and in doing so stimulate an adaptive reponse to the stress. Hence the term adaptogen. It's a bit like going to the gym and working out. Your lifting a weight and applying a stress to the muscle. The muscle responds to the stress and comes back stronger. The same applies with adaptogenic supplements. Another very good adaptogenic supplement is Rhodiola Rosea

here are a few great papers on the topic
QUOTE
Mech Ageing Dev. 2004 Apr;125(4):285-9.
Aging, anti-aging, and hormesis.

* Rattan SI.

Department of Molecular Biology, Danish Centre for Molecular Gerontology, University of Aarhus, Gustav Wieds Vej, DK-8000 Aarhus-C, Denmark. rattan@imsb.au.dk

As a result of almost 50 years of efforts in collecting descriptive data, biogerontologists are now able to construct general principles of aging and to explore possibilities of gerontomodulation. Most of the data indicate that aging is characterized by a stochastic accumulation of molecular damage and a progressive failure of maintenance and repair, and the genes involved in homeodynamic pathways are the most likely candidate virtual gerontogenes. Several approaches are being tried and tested to modulate aging in a wide variety of organisms, but with the ultimate aim of improving the quality of human life in old age. These approaches include gene therapy, hormonal supplementation, nutritional modulation, and intervention by antioxidants and other molecules. A recent approach is that of applying hormesis in aging research and therapy, which is based on the principle of stimulation of maintenance and repair pathways by repeated exposure to mild stress.

PMID: 15063104 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


QUOTE
Phytother Res. 2005 Oct;19(10):819-38.

Stimulating effect of adaptogens: an overview with particular reference to their efficacy following single dose administration.

* Panossian A,
* Wagner H.

Swedish Herbal Institute, Viktor Rydbergsgatan 10, SE-411 32 Gothenburg, Sweden. ap@shi.se

Plant adaptogens are compounds that increase the ability of an organism to adapt to environmental factors and to avoid damage from such factors. The beneficial effects of multi-dose administration of adaptogens are mainly associated with the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, a part of the stress-system that is believed to play a primary role in the reactions of the body to repeated stress and adaptation. In contrast, the single dose application of adaptogens is important in situations that require a rapid response to tension or to a stressful situation. In this case, the effects of the adaptogens are associated with another part of the stress-system, namely, the sympatho-adrenal-system (SAS), that provides a rapid response mechanism mainly to control the acute reaction of the organism to a stressor. This review focuses primarily on the SAS-mediated stimulating effects of single doses of adaptogens derived from Rhodiola rosea, Schizandra chinensis and Eleutherococcus senticosus. The use of these drugs typically generates no side effects, unlike traditional stimulants that possess addiction, tolerance and abuse potential, produce a negative effect on sleep structure, and cause rebound hypersomnolence or 'come down' effects. Furthermore, single administration of these adaptogens effectively increases mental performance and physical working capacity in humans. R. rosea is the most active of the three plant adaptogens producing, within 30 min of administration, a stimulating effect that continues for at least 4-6 h. The active principles of the three plants that exhibit single dose stimulating effects are glycosides of phenylpropane- and phenylethane-based phenolic compounds such as salidroside, rosavin, syringin and triandrin, the latter being the most active. Copyright © 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

PMID: 16261511 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


LifeMirage, do you take Rhodiola??

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Flex
post Nov 25, 2006, 12:07 PM
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QUOTE(Zoolander @ Nov 25, 2006, 07:07 AM) *

Flex,

QUOTE
Why no pasteurized foods? And why no microwave? That would eliminate like half of my diet...


sometimes you need to make sacrifices matey. Maintaining optimal health and preserving what you have for as long as possible requires comittment.

If you're not prepared to make changes/sacrifices in your quest to achieve certain goals then you need to ask yourself


That still doesn't answer WHY smile.gif I understand you need to make changes, but I was wondering why exactly microwaved and pasteurized foods need to be avoided so much. I mean is there really that big of a difference between oat meal cooked on the stove, and cooked in the microwave?

As far as taking one gram of creatine, maybe it is because lifemirage eats plenty of raw, or lightly cooked fish?
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