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> Modafinil ( Provigil ) As A Smart Drug?
cerebral
post Feb 08, 2006, 10:11 PM
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Modafinil ('Provigil', 'Alertec', 'Vigicer', 'Modalert', etc) is a memory-improving and mood-brightening psychostimulant. It enhances wakefulness and vigilance. It is currently prescribed for people with narcolepsy.

I have not taken modafinil personally, but everything I have heard and read about it suggests it could function as a nootropic in normal people without narcolepsy. Does anyone have any experience with this? Should we expect that modafinil would put you in a hypervigilant state?

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cerebral
post Feb 18, 2006, 01:40 PM
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thanks. Was just the answer I was looking for
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mayonaise
post Feb 19, 2006, 07:36 AM
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I've heard from a very experienced guy that he doesn't like the way it raises adrenaline levels. Same complaint about ampakines. Seems like the present day compounds are not very clean in their effects (yet pretty clean compared to most street drugs).
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OnlyNow
post Feb 19, 2006, 11:48 AM
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Hi cerebral. It's difficult to find anything to add to the pithy post above by our "Guest". However, I'm feeling chatty, so here goes.

Is modafinil is a smart drug? Well, *I* take it every day--so there's one question you can put to rest...

I started taking Provigil a few months ago for daytime drowsiness. One known side effect is that the drug can cause headaches. This happened to me at first, but only for a few days. I almost quit taking it because of that. I stuck with it, and the headaches soon subsided. For the first week or two, I experienced an incredible burst of energy bordering on euphoria. I cleaned house, rearranged furniture and even COOKED DINNERS. (As a precaution, I left all charge cards at home when I went to the mall.) A few times, I stayed awake most of the night without any kind of noticeable problems. No rebound sleepiness, headaches, withdrawal symptoms or other unpleasant side effects. Since then, those extreme effects have more or less evened out for me (damnit). Nowadays, I experience a noticeable feeling of increased energy shortly after taking the drug that lasts roughly two hours. This is followed by a general sense of alertness and wakefulness throughout the rest of the day. Sleep comes easily at night. I even have no problem indulging in an occasional nap during the day, should I so desire. One nice effect I've noticed is a brightening of my mood without the increased irratability that one might find with speed or caffeine (though I still drink one or two cups of coffee a day to preserve some of my bitchiness).

To answer your question as to whether modafinil can induce a hypervigilant state--not really, if you're defining hypervigilance as my dictionary does--an abnormal state of awareness accompanied by disturbing, intrusive thoughts. The drug does enhance my general awareness and concentration, especially when I'm deliberately focusing in on something (writing a computer program is one example in my case). I suppose one could intentionally overdose to amplify such effects, but of course, caution should be exercised.

I have thought about the idea of tapering off and stopping my daily use of Provigil altogether with the plan of stockpiling my monthly prescription so that I can use the drug situationally. I wonder if the "burst of energy" effect could be preserved and utilized whenever I so choose. Spring cleaning? Exams? "Dancing" all night? The list goes on and on. My own prescribing doctor admitted that he self-administered Provigil with excellent results for a marathon road trip to Miami. He told me how numerous studies are currently being conducted to test all kinds of possible benefits of modafinil, including reducing the cognitive impairment of Alzheimer's. I can tell he loves this drug.

Modafinil has been lauded for having amphetamine-like effects without excessive euphoria or danger of physical addiction. However, there is some concern that people might develop a moderate dependency on the drug. I am a little uneasy about that possibility, myself. I'm in no big hurry to stop.

This was likely tmi, but I figured wtf.

http://www.modafinil.com/

This post has been edited by OnlyNow: Feb 19, 2006, 11:51 AM
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OnlyNow
post Feb 21, 2006, 01:03 AM
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Guest...or Ghost?

Methinks *somebody* removed a nonsensical post by a phantom "Guest." The post was mostly numbers. My l33t5p33k is lacking, so I did not spend much time trying to decipher it. Anyway, while I'm thrilled that the post has been del33ted, without it, my post might be misconstrued. Specifically, the beloved poster mayonaise might think I was referring to him/her* as the Guest. I wasn't.

I also spelled irritability wrong. It started out as irratibility, and I changed it to irratability. I give up.

___________________
*Oh how I long for a gender-neutral word for him/her. WHY didn't they think of that to begin with? Did they not know the meaning of politically correct? I guess they just HAD to know the gender every time. At any rate, "hir" is a bad alternative. I tend to pronounce it "her," but that defeats the whole purpose. The only sensible pronunciation is "hear," but isn't that still too feminine? Imagine saying, "Bring me hir jock strap." Our ancesters blew it. We had one golden opportunity to rectify that--but we chose the wrong word.
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Guest
post Feb 21, 2006, 02:59 AM
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Beloved ohmy.gif \o

I know I'm quick to judge but no, that didn't occur to me. For some reason...
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mayonaise
post Feb 21, 2006, 03:00 AM
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That was me.
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Ghost
post Feb 21, 2006, 07:05 AM
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Thanks, mayo. It's good to know I didn't offend you.
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OnlyNow
post Feb 21, 2006, 07:06 AM
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That was me.
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soundscore
post Feb 21, 2006, 11:13 PM
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ONLY > this is a topical post for me so i joined to add to it.

I am on "the new vitamin P" as well and have been taking on and off for about 6 months. I have what I would term as a slightly uneasy relationship with it. I think that it has some potential for addiction and I am at the point where I would rather take it than not. To comment on one of your points, I have found that if I stop it for a few (slightly less happy) days, when I take it again it hits harder i.e. better. On a quotidian basis it does sort of fit in more and stand out less.

a. I think it is addictive although not an unmanageably big gun in this area. I do a little bit of a battle whether or whether not to take it with the fact that it enhances my ability to work, sell, converse and do my hi wire act job.

b. it is certainly a mood-elevator and I liked your 2 hours up, then level off description. I am now looking for provigil that will have a longer "honeymoon" period cause I like those first two hours.

c. the only thing I have found is that I tend to want MORE of it (more of everything, hell) and so I am not "replacing" my voracious consumption of coffee with PG, I am doing the same amount of caffeine and catching the elevator up to the next floor.

d. LOVE it. Can sleep and even nap. I don't think or find personally that it elemininates the need for sleep although it lessens the need for sleep. I am on prozac for anxiety, wellbutrin to sort of counteract the prozac and now PG for energy and wakefulness. The SSRI's all have a bit of a lethargy and tiredness to them, thus the prescript for PG.

e. Am I on it now? Absolutely.

soundscore

Is modafinil is a smart drug? Well, *I* take it every day--so there's one question you can put to rest...

I started taking Provigil a few months ago for daytime drowsiness. One known side effect is that the drug can cause headaches. This happened to me at first, but only for a few days. I almost quit taking it because of that. I stuck with it, and the headaches soon subsided. For the first week or two, I experienced an incredible burst of energy bordering on euphoria. I cleaned house, rearranged furniture and even COOKED DINNERS. (As a precaution, I left all charge cards at home when I went to the mall.) A few times, I stayed awake most of the night without any kind of noticeable problems. No rebound sleepiness, headaches, withdrawal symptoms or other unpleasant side effects. Since then, those extreme effects have more or less evened out for me (damnit). Nowadays, I experience a noticeable feeling of increased energy shortly after taking the drug that lasts roughly two hours. This is followed by a general sense of alertness and wakefulness throughout the rest of the day. Sleep comes easily at night. I even have no problem indulging in an occasional nap during the day, should I so desire. One nice effect I've noticed is a brightening of my mood without the increased irratability that one might find with speed or caffeine (though I still drink one or two cups of coffee a day to preserve some of my bitchiness).

To answer your question as to whether modafinil can induce a hypervigilant state--not really, if you're defining hypervigilance as my dictionary does--an abnormal state of awareness accompanied by disturbing, intrusive thoughts. The drug does enhance my general awareness and concentration, especially when I'm deliberately focusing in on something (writing a computer program is one example in my case). I suppose one could intentionally overdose to amplify such effects, but of course, caution should be exercised.

I have thought about the idea of tapering off and stopping my daily use of Provigil altogether with the plan of stockpiling my monthly prescription so that I can use the drug situationally. I wonder if the "burst of energy" effect could be preserved and utilized whenever I so choose. Spring cleaning? Exams? "Dancing" all night? The list goes on and on. My own prescribing doctor admitted that he self-administered Provigil with excellent results for a marathon road trip to Miami. He told me how numerous studies are currently being conducted to test all kinds of possible benefits of modafinil, including reducing the cognitive impairment of Alzheimer's. I can tell he loves this drug.

Modafinil has been lauded for having amphetamine-like effects without excessive euphoria or danger of physical addiction. However, there is some concern that people might develop a moderate dependency on the drug. I am a little uneasy about that possibility, myself. I'm in no big hurry to stop.

This was likely tmi, but I figured wtf.

http://www.modafinil.com/
[/quote]
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OnlyNow
post Feb 27, 2006, 11:41 PM
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soundscore-
Thanks for sharing. Your experiences are nearly identical to mine.

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soundscore
post Mar 02, 2006, 10:16 PM
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QUOTE(OnlyNow @ Feb 27, 11:41 PM) *

soundscore-
Thanks for sharing. Your experiences are nearly identical to mine.


went to the doc today and had a good consult. I shared my concerns about addiction and above observations. his take was interesting. He said that he didn't see me using any of this stuff too much or in an addictive way. He said the PG is no different than the Wellbutrin. Both promote wakefulness, the provigil has more energy and some mood elevation that is more figure ground different. But the Wellbutrin is taken by people for about the same reason.

His recommend? Kill the wellbutrin, tapering from 300 down to 150 then off. And UP (interesting choice of word) the provigil to 200 & 200. Taken first thing then around 12 noon (I am up early). This makes total sense to me and I wil try it. He said the way for somebody like me to use PG is NOT situationally. He said that is fine for the jetlagged traveller that is not taking it with the goal of offsetting the SSRI (prozac) induced lethargy. But for me, who is trying to refind/recalibrate a daily life energy thing, it is better taken regularly.

I will advise how the 200/200 no wellbutrin program goes.

good conversation.

soundscore
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moorpheus
post Nov 30, 2006, 01:48 AM
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My experience was different from those expressed here.

I had the good experience of being wakeful and energetic until bedtime, then being able to sleep for a full night's sleep. I noticed no negative effects.

After a few days, however, I felt confused, and somewhat agitated when awake. I was weepy and upset and easily frustrated. The only thing different in my regime was the Modafinil -- so I decided to stop taking it. I'm looking for other similar experiences and wanted to share mine with others.

I continue to have the best nootropic effects with alertness and focus with small doses of phenytoin. But, for me, I won't take this again.


moorph

QUOTE(cerebral @ Feb 09, 2006, 01:11 AM) *

Modafinil ('Provigil', 'Alertec', 'Vigicer', 'Modalert', etc) is a memory-improving and mood-brightening psychostimulant. It enhances wakefulness and vigilance. It is currently prescribed for people with narcolepsy.

I have not taken modafinil personally, but everything I have heard and read about it suggests it could function as a nootropic in normal people without narcolepsy. Does anyone have any experience with this? Should we expect that modafinil would put you in a hypervigilant state?

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Isse
post Apr 25, 2007, 11:50 AM
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Moorpeus: Have you tried other nootroops? How does phenytoin compare on a scale? Anyone els have experience of this substance? Ive read about it and it seems to be a good allround nootroop. It has been compared to Metylfenidat among other substances! With less sideeffects.



QUOTE(moorpheus @ Nov 30, 2006, 11:48 AM) *

My experience was different from those expressed here.

I had the good experience of being wakeful and energetic until bedtime, then being able to sleep for a full night's sleep. I noticed no negative effects.

After a few days, however, I felt confused, and somewhat agitated when awake. I was weepy and upset and easily frustrated. The only thing different in my regime was the Modafinil -- so I decided to stop taking it. I'm looking for other similar experiences and wanted to share mine with others.

I continue to have the best nootropic effects with alertness and focus with small doses of phenytoin. But, for me, I won't take this again.


moorph

QUOTE(cerebral @ Feb 09, 2006, 01:11 AM) *

Modafinil ('Provigil', 'Alertec', 'Vigicer', 'Modalert', etc) is a memory-improving and mood-brightening psychostimulant. It enhances wakefulness and vigilance. It is currently prescribed for people with narcolepsy.

I have not taken modafinil personally, but everything I have heard and read about it suggests it could function as a nootropic in normal people without narcolepsy. Does anyone have any experience with this? Should we expect that modafinil would put you in a hypervigilant state?


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Candy
post Nov 17, 2007, 08:31 AM
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My husband has sleep apnea and doesn't like his C-pap. His doc recommended Provigil, and it really helped for a few days, until hubby decided if 400 mg a day is good, 4000 a day would be better.

It was like speed for him -- he was up for 2 days, very confused, slurred speech, uncontrollable facial tics and body movements, increased sleep apnea when he finally fell asleep (after 12 mg Lunesta).

I'm a nurse used to monitoring meds -- and more than a little bitchy about this, even w/out coffee! I took the pills away. He had about a week of bad days and nights, but he's still not where he was before this. Obviously, he was an idiot to do this, and I was an idiot to let him manage his own meds.

Research into this drug scares me to death -- the potential for abuse is huge, users can become dependent easily (but withdrawal isn't terrible -- just annoying for a few days) and the long-term affects are unknown. There is now a class action lawsuit for P users who have been diagnosed with Stevens-Johnson Syndrome or Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis.

More common side effects include headache, nausea, URI, chest pain, anxiety, insomnia, nervousness, disruption of sleep, difficulty breathing or swallowing, change in voice, skin irritations, sores on the body or in the mouth, facial swelling, skin peeling, hallucinations and very vivid dreams/nightmares.

Hubby still has sleep issues that he didn't have before, including vivid dreams, thrashing about in his sleep, extreme talking in his sleep (including yelling).

Be careful with this stuff -- used as directed, it's likely OK, but it's not the wonder drug people think.


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moorpheus
post Dec 29, 2007, 03:50 PM
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QUOTE(Isse @ Apr 25, 2007, 02:50 PM) *

Moorpeus: Have you tried other nootroops? How does phenytoin compare on a scale? Anyone els have experience of this substance? Ive read about it and it seems to be a good allround nootroop. It has been compared to Metylfenidat among other substances! With less sideeffects.
Sorry, I haven't been back for a LONG time.

Phenytoin is great. I feel calm and focused all the time. My overthinking and ruminating isn't triggered. I simply feel like me. There is no weirdness and no fuzziness or otherness feeling. I don't feel drugged. I don't feel tired. I don't feel wired. I feel . . . fixed! There are problems in my life, natch, and I just deal with them without overreacting.

It's good to get (or read online) Dreyfus's book "A Remarkable Medicine Has Been Overlooked."
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mdma
post Apr 12, 2009, 12:47 PM
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QUOTE(Candy @ Nov 17, 2007, 09:31 AM) *

My husband has sleep apnea and doesn't like his C-pap. His doc recommended Provigil, and it really helped for a few days, until hubby decided if 400 mg a day is good, 4000 a day would be better.




So yeah, 400mg of Modafinil is good ill just take TEN TIMES the proposed dosage??
Thats a bit crazy(if not stupid). He took what 40 pills? That has to be the stupidest thing ive read on this forum.
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Olivia
post Apr 25, 2010, 02:45 AM
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Yeah. This thread is so old but I think it is still helpful for many people.
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Kass
post Feb 18, 2011, 05:44 AM
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QUOTE(mdma @ Apr 12, 2009, 12:47 PM) *

QUOTE(Candy @ Nov 17, 2007, 09:31 AM) *

My husband has sleep apnea and doesn't like his C-pap. His doc recommended Provigil, and it really helped for a few days, until hubby decided if 400 mg a day is good, 4000 a day would be better.




So yeah, 400mg of Modafinil is good ill just take TEN TIMES the proposed dosage??
Thats a bit crazy(if not stupid). He took what 40 pills? That has to be the stupidest thing ive read on this forum.


Yes very stupid! Wow.

That said.. I came across this forum while researching why my speech is slurred in the afternoons. It has happened before on PG, but sometimes now with out it. It's sort of like my tongue swells and saliva builds. Then I slur a lot of words and sound drunk. ANY feedback on this would be appreciated.

Back to the viability of PG....

Addicting? Yes, but more like a great tv show, book or favorite pair of shoes. I go with out it often while waiting on new insurance to kick in, or lack of cash for co-pays. It sucks but I am fine. I would say "I can't live with out it," but I do, quite often and am fine.

I have self medicated most of the time. I am prescribed 400 & typically stat with 100 and take the next 3 parts as needed during the day. Most day I take 300.

If I have a situation coming up that might require full 400 or more I plan for it accordingly. I can say I have never taken more then 800 in a 24 hour period.

Once I take more then 400 the flushing and racing heart, shaky hands and slurred speech become too much. It makes the extra alertness not worth it.

But like I said, I can't imaging going back to life without it! I can stay awake at work, help my spouse on long drives, travel for work, read book for more then a few minutes at a time.... The list goes on and on!


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maryn
post Mar 03, 2011, 06:35 PM
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QUOTE(Kass @ Feb 18, 2011, 05:44 AM) *

QUOTE(mdma @ Apr 12, 2009, 12:47 PM) *

QUOTE(Candy @ Nov 17, 2007, 09:31 AM) *

My husband has sleep apnea and doesn't like his C-pap. His doc recommended Provigil, and it really helped for a few days, until hubby decided if 400 mg a day is good, 4000 a day would be better.




I[ve been taking provigil for about 6 months, occasionally Nuvigil. TAKE 300 mg around 10 in the morning, many days another 100 mg around 4 pm. Fall asleep without issue about 10 pm. No vivid dreams (try the nic patch if you like a wild ride all night!). have developed a slight vocal tic of late, a little "umph" in the back of my throat. If I am super vigilant I can keep from doing it at work or in meetings (yikes!).

For teh woman whose husband wont wear his c pap, for christs sake, thats for his apnea! Provig is for daytime tiredness, yeah, but it won't help an arrythmia from night time apnea! Send me his provigil and slap that mask on him!!

Maryn
So yeah, 400mg of Modafinil is good ill just take TEN TIMES the proposed dosage??
Thats a bit crazy(if not stupid). He took what 40 pills? That has to be the stupidest thing ive read on this forum.


Yes very stupid! Wow.

That said.. I came across this forum while researching why my speech is slurred in the afternoons. It has happened before on PG, but sometimes now with out it. It's sort of like my tongue swells and saliva builds. Then I slur a lot of words and sound drunk. ANY feedback on this would be appreciated.

Back to the viability of PG....

Addicting? Yes, but more like a great tv show, book or favorite pair of shoes. I go with out it often while waiting on new insurance to kick in, or lack of cash for co-pays. It sucks but I am fine. I would say "I can't live with out it," but I do, quite often and am fine.

I have self medicated most of the time. I am prescribed 400 & typically stat with 100 and take the next 3 parts as needed during the day. Most day I take 300.

If I have a situation coming up that might require full 400 or more I plan for it accordingly. I can say I have never taken more then 800 in a 24 hour period.

Once I take more then 400 the flushing and racing heart, shaky hands and slurred speech become too much. It makes the extra alertness not worth it.

But like I said, I can't imaging going back to life without it! I can stay awake at work, help my spouse on long drives, travel for work, read book for more then a few minutes at a time.... The list goes on and on!

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astaluv
post Jul 05, 2011, 08:36 PM
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It helps people with low IQ and low working memory capacity. It dosent make much difference in person who is already optimized.
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Jupiter
post Jul 21, 2011, 03:16 AM
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Can someone tell us the reality of the creativity lowering effect of modafinil.
Is it real ?
What would help a very creative person to gain in speed if caffeine is ineffective .

Thanks,Rebecca
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trevdawg
post Oct 20, 2011, 07:41 PM
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has anyone ever tried the product cerebral success? Seems like its got a lot of good stuff in it and its a whole lot easier than buying all the ingredients myself. plus ive heard awesome things about DMAA... if you want energy along with your brain power. its kinda pricey though, but worth it for me if it works.
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trevdawg
post Oct 20, 2011, 07:48 PM
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QUOTE(trevdawg @ Oct 20, 2011, 09:41 PM) *

has anyone ever tried the product cerebral success? Seems like its got a lot of good stuff in it and its a whole lot easier than buying all the ingredients myself. plus ive heard awesome things about DMAA... if you want energy along with your brain power. its kinda pricey though, but worth it for me if it works.

Just found a copuon. g3tsmart for 15% off @ cerebralsuccess(dot)com if any ones interested.
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LeeCrostM.D.
post May 16, 2012, 08:07 PM
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QUOTE(trevdawg @ Oct 20, 2011, 07:41 PM) *

has anyone ever tried the product cerebral success? Seems like its got a lot of good stuff in it and its a whole lot easier than buying all the ingredients myself. plus ive heard awesome things about DMAA... if you want energy along with your brain power. its kinda pricey though, but worth it for me if it works.


DMAA is a horribly risky compound that provides no true health benefits. I would strongly urge people to avoid taking it.
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CeeJay
post Aug 28, 2012, 11:01 AM
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I too have sleep apnea and use a cpap religiously. However I am not able to stay awake during the day at work, on the drive home, etc. I am a candidate to have my turbinates reduced so that more air can get through the nasal passages. But during the day I get enough oxygen and still fall asleep after drinking a 5 hour energy extra strength. I am now at the end of my rope. I need to keep my job, so I am going to ask my sleep specialist to prescribe provigil. I do worry about Stevens Johnson Syndrome. Has anyone experienced that while on this medication?

QUOTE(Candy @ Nov 17, 2007, 08:31 AM) *

My husband has sleep apnea and doesn't like his C-pap. His doc recommended Provigil, and it really helped for a few days, until hubby decided if 400 mg a day is good, 4000 a day would be better.

It was like speed for him -- he was up for 2 days, very confused, slurred speech, uncontrollable facial tics and body movements, increased sleep apnea when he finally fell asleep (after 12 mg Lunesta).

I'm a nurse used to monitoring meds -- and more than a little bitchy about this, even w/out coffee! I took the pills away. He had about a week of bad days and nights, but he's still not where he was before this. Obviously, he was an idiot to do this, and I was an idiot to let him manage his own meds.

Research into this drug scares me to death -- the potential for abuse is huge, users can become dependent easily (but withdrawal isn't terrible -- just annoying for a few days) and the long-term affects are unknown. There is now a class action lawsuit for P users who have been diagnosed with Stevens-Johnson Syndrome or Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis.

More common side effects include headache, nausea, URI, chest pain, anxiety, insomnia, nervousness, disruption of sleep, difficulty breathing or swallowing, change in voice, skin irritations, sores on the body or in the mouth, facial swelling, skin peeling, hallucinations and very vivid dreams/nightmares.

Hubby still has sleep issues that he didn't have before, including vivid dreams, thrashing about in his sleep, extreme talking in his sleep (including yelling).

Be careful with this stuff -- used as directed, it's likely OK, but it's not the wonder drug people think.

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post Sep 17, 2012, 01:28 PM
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QUOTE(cerebral @ Feb 08, 2006, 10:11 PM) *

Modafinil ('Provigil', 'Alertec', 'Vigicer', 'Modalert', etc) is a memory-improving and mood-brightening psychostimulant. It enhances wakefulness and vigilance. It is currently prescribed for people with narcolepsy.

I have not taken modafinil personally, but everything I have heard and read about it suggests it could function as a nootropic in normal people without narcolepsy. Does anyone have any experience with this? Should we expect that modafinil would put you in a hypervigilant state?

------------------------------

This is for US consumers primarily -- the UK based suppliers I contacted simply charge too much for their pills and for the related shipping).

I have recently dealt with a lady Donna Nielsen (dnielsen163 at gmail) in India.

#1 -- she accepts Paypal.....WOW (every other source I found wanted me to send them a money order, etcetera--They DID NOT even accept Mastercard or Visa which made me nervous to begin with).

#2 -- Her price was HALF of what the UK sellers are asking,
#3 -- the shipping was reasonable, and the pills she sent were obviously factory packed by a top pharmaceutical company. Additionally I have verified the pill markings as being as they should be for the pills requested and the effects were exactly what they should be for the pills ordered.
#4 -- (She has Modalert and Modafinil--which are generics of Provigil).

I Highly Recommend her for US Consumers looking for Fast EASY and SAFE purchase of these substances.

Best Regards --

PS: I have been a member of international High IQ societies going back over 40 years and as a basically intelligent person without ingesting any intelligence enhancing substances, I am impressed with the added vigilance and extended attentiveness that Provigil/Modafinil has provided me access to.






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princebariya
post Mar 27, 2013, 09:12 PM
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well i dont think Provigil is good. i was using this since last four months but i am not getting the 1 % of result by it. its such a waste of time and money.
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ron45
post May 01, 2015, 11:09 AM
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Judging from some of these posts some of you aren't reading much outside this forum when I comes to modafinil. The special opps people and pilots and others in our and other country's military personel have be switched to modafinil because of it's effectivness AND it's low potential for addiction in vulnerable populations. Ah..... those would be people who like to get high. That other phrase was low potential...... Could be the d e a has people posting dire tales on fourms like these, no one in this thread of course {;^)>.

modafinil is a stereo enantomer like deprenyl. You can learn what stereo enantomers are on and more about modafinil on wikipedia. All the hard words [medical/chemistry] are links to the explanation of what they mean. Speculation is cheap, reading takes valuable time.

Ron
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modman
post Jan 31, 2016, 02:02 PM
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QUOTE(cerebral @ Feb 08, 2006, 10:11 PM) *

Modafinil ('Provigil', 'Alertec', 'Vigicer', 'Modalert', etc) is a memory-improving and mood-brightening psychostimulant. It enhances wakefulness and vigilance. It is currently prescribed for people with narcolepsy.

I have not taken modafinil personally, but everything I have heard and read about it suggests it could function as a nootropic in normal people without narcolepsy. Does anyone have any experience with this? Should we expect that modafinil would put you in a hypervigilant state?


Yes it is classed as a Nootropic like the many thousands already out as Modafinil Australia states. It is great for the brain and its effects are cumulutive. That means the more you take, the better it gets.

Go see a doctor before you participate in buying any from a pharmacy or online.

cheers!
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