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Dan
post Mar 08, 2005, 04:14 PM
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sweet
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post Mar 08, 2005, 05:41 PM
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Totally, dude!
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post Mar 08, 2005, 05:42 PM
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I figured only slang like nifty and neat came out of the fifties.
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post Mar 09, 2005, 07:03 PM
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That's the bomb!
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post Mar 09, 2005, 08:16 PM
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Ooooohhhh, that's hot.
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post Mar 09, 2005, 08:50 PM
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QUOTE (Rick @ Mar 08, 04:39 PM)
...as a kid in the 1950s.

What were the skies like when you were young?
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post Mar 11, 2005, 08:22 PM
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QUOTE (Rick @ Mar 08, 04:39 PM)
The cool thing about "cool" is that it's been cool for over 50 years now. I used the term as a kid in the 1950s.

Are words (or slang) trancendental then?
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Rick
post Mar 16, 2005, 10:47 AM
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QUOTE (Trip like I do @ Mar 08, 06:42 PM)
I figured only slang like nifty and neat came out of the fifties.

Nope. Cool jazz and cool cat. A cat is a dude.
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flowerfairy
post Mar 18, 2005, 06:16 AM
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QUOTE (Trip like I do @ Mar 11, 08:22 PM)
QUOTE (Rick @ Mar 08, 04:39 PM)
The cool thing about "cool" is that it's been cool for over 50 years now. I used the term as a kid in the 1950s.

Are words (or slang) trancendental then?

yeah, maybe they speak english in heaven
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Rick
post Mar 18, 2005, 11:56 AM
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I'll let you know when I get back.
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HiddenVariable
post Jan 14, 2007, 05:09 AM
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The set of all transcendental numbers is one-to-one with the real continuum R. This arises from that fact that you can prove that the set of all algebraics is Aleph null, and thus the set of all transcendentals must be c in order for transcendentals U algebraics = R.

I can get the proof that the set of algebraics is aleph null if anybody is interested. (It involves setting up a correspondence between all polynomials and the rationals by invoking the properties of finite cont'd fractions)
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Rick
post Jan 15, 2007, 12:25 PM
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I can see that the set of algebraics is Aleph null. An open question: is R really continuous?
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Flex
post Jan 15, 2007, 04:47 PM
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QUOTE(Rick @ Mar 08, 2005, 01:39 PM) *

The cool thing about "cool" is that it's been cool for over 50 years now. I used the term as a kid in the 1950s.


Lol well maybe you can explain then how it ever caught on (I admit, I have fallen victim to the tem myself). Where did the term originate? I suspect cool is going to be a thing of the past soon, "chill" is the new "cool". I guess my generation just needed a slightly different twist smile.gif
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HiddenVariable
post Jan 15, 2007, 04:59 PM
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QUOTE(Rick @ Jan 15, 2007, 12:25 PM) *

I can see that the set of algebraics is Aleph null. An open question: is R really continuous?


Depending upon what you think of as continuous.

Another very very open question: the continuum hypothesis. It's entirely independent of ZFC smile.gif
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Rick
post Jan 16, 2007, 03:18 PM
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I'd guess continuous means "without a break." For example, if we take a line in space composed of a continuous set of real numbered points, and remove one of them, say the square root of two, then the resulting "punctured" line is discontinuous, assuming the reals are continuous.

According to Wolfram's Website, the continuum hypothesis has been shown to be undecidable.

Rudy Rucker worked on it for a while without results.
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Rick
post Jan 16, 2007, 03:22 PM
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QUOTE(Flex @ Jan 15, 2007, 04:47 PM) *
Lol well maybe you can explain then how it ever caught on ...

I think jazz musicians in the 50s referred to certain flavors of jazz as "cool" and it took off from there. It was just part of the child culture for me. Meme reflection, like neutrons bouncing around in a light water reactor.
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HiddenVariable
post Jan 16, 2007, 04:48 PM
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QUOTE(Rick @ Jan 16, 2007, 03:18 PM) *

I'd guess continuous means "without a break." For example, if we take a line in space composed of a continuous set of real numbered points, and remove one of them, say the square root of two, then the resulting "punctured" line is discontinuous, assuming the reals are continuous.

According to Wolfram's Website, the continuum hypothesis has been shown to be undecidable.

Rudy Rucker worked on it for a while without results.


Undecidable as in independent of most widely accepted axioms. (Like ZFC)

The ideas of "continuity" and "brokenness" are very subjective. Is the set of rationals, Q, continuous? Well, between any two there are another infinity of them... as well as another uncountably many irrationals.

Q is dense in R, even though R is uncountable and Q is countable. This seems ironic, but it is true.

Hard stuff to imagine..
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Hey Hey
post Jan 16, 2007, 07:57 PM
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QUOTE(HiddenVariable @ Jan 17, 2007, 12:48 AM) *
QUOTE(Rick @ Jan 16, 2007, 03:18 PM) *
I'd guess continuous means "without a break." For example, if we take a line in space composed of a continuous set of real numbered points, and remove one of them, say the square root of two, then the resulting "punctured" line is discontinuous, assuming the reals are continuous.

According to Wolfram's Website, the continuum hypothesis has been shown to be undecidable.

Rudy Rucker worked on it for a while without results.
Undecidable as in independent of most widely accepted axioms. (Like ZFC)

The ideas of "continuity" and "brokenness" are very subjective. Is the set of rationals, Q, continuous? Well, between any two there are another infinity of them... as well as another uncountably many irrationals.

Q is dense in R, even though R is uncountable and Q is countable. This seems ironic, but it is true.

Hard stuff to imagine..
A bit like "now".
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Rick
post Jan 17, 2007, 10:28 AM
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There is only now. Time does not exist (as a physical dimension).
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HiddenVariable
post Jan 17, 2007, 01:12 PM
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QUOTE(Rick @ Jan 17, 2007, 10:28 AM) *

There is only now. Time does not exist (as a physical dimension).


Matter exists in different places in space, and at any point in time we could say that there is matter. It doesn't seem to me to have any contradictions by thinking of time as a dimension; it in fact fits up nicely with lots of phenomena involving matter and position.

But of course, if we think of it that way, it is obvious that time is a unique dimension as it is along this axis that our perception/change occur, and it is central to many descriptive equations which are not symmetric over a supposed 4 dimensions.

The fundamental indication of time is our own memory, which for the most part assumed objective, thereby establishing information which we can think of as an abstract structure involving time, with similarities to our idea of dimensions.
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Rick
post Jan 17, 2007, 01:40 PM
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Thinking of time as a dimension is indeed very convenient, and our brains are wired to do so very naturally. But as I have looked at the time problem (over time), it seems to me that the only consistent ontology is to exclude time as a "thing" that has existence, but is rather a mental construction for convenience.

For example, viewing time as a dimension leads to Jean Calvin's (founder of the false Calvinist religion) error of thinking that the future exists and therefore is immutable.
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Hey Hey
post Jan 17, 2007, 07:12 PM
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QUOTE(Rick @ Jan 17, 2007, 06:28 PM) *
There is only now. Time does not exist (as a physical dimension).
Is there even a now? If there is, will it not have a period? And cannot that period be infinitely divided? So the term now is maybe a bad one. There just "is", or maybe "is not", or maybe a sort of Kekulaen hypo-hyper dimensional state.

The trouble with all of this, is that using our human terms and definitions (both often having incredulous evidence) many things might not exist. Mass, space, dimensions, consciousness, time, life etc. At the very best, the terms and descriptions of the associated phenomena will change, hopefully into things more meaningful. But I doubt it ...

Is is meaningful to exist, when we do so in a state of false descriptions with no real hope of resolution? What value is there in being part of an infinite illusion? I'm off to the poetry forum ......
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Rick
post Jan 19, 2007, 12:46 PM
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Some things improve with age.
Shall I dare to list them here?
Some bonsai, some software, a sage.
Other things decline with time,
Against them we can only rage.
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P.j.S
post Jul 12, 2009, 03:59 PM
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QUOTE(Rick @ Jan 19, 2007, 12:46 PM) *

Some things improve with age.
Shall I dare to list them here?
Some bonsai, some software, a sage.
Other things decline with time,
Against them we can only rage.

And as long as we don't touch we may love our own lives very much!.
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