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> de ja vu syndrome, whats the theory behind de ja vu syndrome
DR.V.VIKRAM SASHANK
post Apr 12, 2013, 09:06 PM
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some times we may get a feeling that the situation happening at present had happened before . how could it be possible if we have no memory of that situation before
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Dennis Sedov
post Jul 22, 2013, 05:26 AM
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I'm still in undergrad but I read a lot of literature on neuroscience and cognition. My personal understanding is the following:

Primarily function of our cortex is to learn patterns. They can be temporal, spacial or both. When an event triggers a de ja bu syndrome, it means that a temporal representation of the pattern that had just occurred had been "corrupted". I see two events that may trigger this as well:

1) The pattern you have just experienced is very similar to something in the past. Perhaps, there is a threshold for similarity that either creates and "extension" to a pattern that already exists, modifies the pattern and adds a new temporal variable or creates a new pattern all together. Temporal representation is the part that gets "corrupted", overlaying new spacial information with old temporal information.

2) Perhaps there is a temporal dependencies in patterns (i.e. in succeeding events, one pattern would rely on other pattern's temporal information. When this gets corrupted, your new experience bounds with another experience temporal representation, which renders de ja vu syndrome.

This might as well be nonsense, however, at this point I strongly believe in the fact that cortex stores patterns for all our experiences.
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Dan Merryday
post Jul 23, 2013, 08:30 PM
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Dennis, that's an interesting explanation.

So, if I read you correctly, deja vu happens when we experience a new situation (new spacial pattern) that closely resembles an old experience (temporal pattern), according to a certain threshold?

How does temporal or spacial pattern get "corrupted"?

Cheers,
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Dennis Sedov
post Jul 23, 2013, 10:17 PM
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It is just a theory, but like anything biological - it corrupts easily =)

On the side note. Patterns can be spacial, temporal or both. What I meant in my previous post is that the newly acquired pattern closely resembles some experience that you had before. And I don't mean that experience are the same - their representation in your brain is the same.

One the other note - something else just came to my mind that might explain de ja vu even better.
You know that there are short-term and long-term memories. Long term memories come from short-term memories via hippocampus. Whenever you repeat some stimuli over an over again, hippocampus creates long term memories in your cortex. Maybe a de ja vu happens when experience that you just had, which supposed to reside in short term memory region for some time, "until further notice", get pushed via hippocampus into your cortical region. This instantly creates a new long-term memory, which you can refer to, producing a feeling of de ja vu.

QUOTE(Dan Merryday @ Jul 23, 2013, 08:30 PM) *

Dennis, that's an interesting explanation.

So, if I read you correctly, deja vu happens when we experience a new situation (new spacial pattern) that closely resembles an old experience (temporal pattern), according to a certain threshold?

How does temporal or spacial pattern get "corrupted"?

Cheers,
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Flex
post Jul 24, 2013, 12:45 PM
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I've noticed this happens to me when my serotonin levels are off. Why would that be?
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evita123
post Jul 27, 2013, 02:25 AM
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This has happened a lot to me lately. Any idea what might be triggering it?
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