BrainMeta'   Connectomics'  

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

 
Reply to this topicStart new topic
> Hello everyone
Bumblebee
post Jun 11, 2013, 04:13 AM
Post #1


Newbie
*

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 12
Joined: Jun 11, 2013
Member No.: 35168



Hello everyone!
I am Bumblebee from the Netherlands, a 28 year old female that is having problems with memory loss and serious troubles with absorbing information. Which seems to be getting worse and worse.
My doctor does not seem to care about it too much, he is of course not able to see how hard it is to feel it happening.
I do care.. a lot..

I have been searching for answers about what to do but there are so many options that I get lost..
I came here in the hopes of finding people that know more about the brain/body, and might have some useful ideas for me to try.
I have always tried to make changes by changing my diet, using herbs or certain foods that should be helpful according to the internet.
Some things seem to help, but because of my lack of focus and working memory, I simply forget the information that I have been reading. This happens all the time, every single day.
In such moments I can barely calculate, and lose focus even before I have finished a thought.
It is extremely frustrating and scary to experience, to know that you just read something.. and gone it is..
Or to hear someones name, and forget it in the next two minutes. Etc.


Maybe I just have a learning disability.. but sometimes I do have clear moments. In such moments I can be a very fast thinker, I can come up with good solutions for things, calculate easily and memorize stuff then. But such moments are extremely rare.
But because they do happen, I know that there is something missing.. something that I cannot reach for some season.

I hope some people here are able to guide me into a good direction.
To make it a bit more clear. The problems that I have can be compared to what you feel when had surgery and the anesthetic is still in your system. I have had surgery some months ago (just the appendix) and what I experienced after, is very much like what I usually experience. Only after surgery it is worse of course.

Anyway, I am very sorry for the long story smile.gif I just lost hope a bit, and because of this forum I feel new hope (a little).

Bumblebee.

User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Flex
post Jun 11, 2013, 11:49 AM
Post #2


God
******

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 1954
Joined: Oct 17, 2006
From: Bay area CA
Member No.: 5877



Hello, it would be helpful if you could give us some clues as to who you are as a person (diet, sleep, exercise, stressful events, etc.). Given what you have provided, you may want to order a hormone panel to check pregnenolone, DHEA, estrogen, etc.
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Bumblebee
post Jun 11, 2013, 02:43 PM
Post #3


Newbie
*

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 12
Joined: Jun 11, 2013
Member No.: 35168



Hey there flex, thank you for your reply.
I did not know I could order a specific test for hormones. I will try to find out how to do that.

And clues,.. well I will try. I am not sure what the most important things would be, just ask if you want to know anything specific.

I do not exercise, I used to do wave surfing and climbing, before I got my problems with tiredness. I stopped because of it. I do ride my bike a lot, because I do not own a car.

My Diet:
My diet is without milk and cheese, so also no yogurt, cream and everything like it. My doctor tested me once for allergies (a blood test), and found nothing. But when I eat cheese, drink milk etc I get extremely tired and sometimes in a weird way even depressed the next day. I know its a bit odd, but its true.
Next to that I eat pretty normal I think.
I use soy milk, eat bread, also meat. I used to be a vegetarian, but because of the tiredness.. I stopped to see if I would become my normal self again. It did not help though.
I eat my vegetables and fruits, and try to drink enough water. So that should be good.
I do drink a lot of coffee, which might not be good.
I take vitamin supplements D and C, sometimes extra zinc + magnesium and often iron (sometimes a multivitamin instead of the whole load smile.gif
I also take Lysine for cold sores, which helps. And omega 3, almost every day. The omega 3 seems to do a lot of good for me, when I forget to take it I notice a difference I think.

Sleep:
I sleep a lot, if I do not set an alarm clock my body just keeps sleeping for way to many hours. 10 to 14 hours can easily happen.
I set my alarm clock because of that, and try to make it 8 or 9 hours.
I always wake up feeling sore in my muscles and bones, I feel stiff like an old lady. This is only the first 3 to 4 hours, it gets better during the day.

Stressful events:
Well.. at the moment everything is ok. My life is good right now, except for the memory problems and tiredness etc.
But in my past I did experience some difficult things. Which I do not want to openly discuss I think. But in short, my father has an extremely high IQ but,.. suffers from schizophrenia, and my mother used alcohol a lot (suffering from severe depression). When I was a child a lot of scary things happened. It might be connected to my problems now.. I do not know.
I did go to see a psychologist for it, and he sees no depression or anything like schizophrenia in me.
I mention both problems anyway because I know it has a lot to do with dopamine, serotonine and other substances in the brain. Sometimes I fear that somehow I do not have the right balance either, just like my parents. But in a different way, a less obvious way maybe?

I do not know what other clues to give. Other then physical problems that I have. Do those matter?
I will just sort of list them, if there are questions about it let me know.
-stomach pains (doctor cannot find anything)
-muscle and joint pains (doctor cannot find anything)
-bowel pains (doctor cannot find anything)
-tietze syndrome (inflammation of one or more of the costal cartilages, this was also diagnosed)

And in the past I had the cytomegalovirus, which usually is not a big problem according to most. But for me it was. (It is like Pfeiffer`s disease in a way)
Not sure if it has anything to do with this all because it was more then 10 years ago, the tiredness started back then. But I do not know if it is connected. It could be a coincidence.
Sorry if I give too much information.

I do think my problems have to do with my brain, because it changes sometimes. But I know too little of how the body and brain work together to know what it could be. I used to think it might be wrong dopamine levels, but not sure.
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Flex
post Jun 11, 2013, 06:38 PM
Post #4


God
******

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 1954
Joined: Oct 17, 2006
From: Bay area CA
Member No.: 5877



Right now I would guess that you probably have some sort of B vitamin deficiency. Try taking a B50 complex for a few weeks in the morning, along with some sort of sublingual B12. It may also help to try out melatonin for your sleep. Should you feel so inclined, you may consider consulting a psychiatrist about using agomelatine; however, I have never tried the stuff myself, so I cannot really recommend its use.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21476953

Not worth the money (at this point): http://www.lef.org/Vitamins-Supplements/It...Blood-Test.html

If you like, you can hit me up on Facebook anytime to try and hash things out a bit more. There are plenty of healthy natural options worth exploring. https://www.facebook.com/guglielmone
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Flex
post Jun 11, 2013, 07:52 PM
Post #5


God
******

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 1954
Joined: Oct 17, 2006
From: Bay area CA
Member No.: 5877



Diet

The average person is composed of approximately 7*1027 atoms, which constantly undergo thousands of reactions, rearranging in a dynamic fashion to produce 105 different molecules. Any cognitive enhancement program must begin with proper nutrition--no pill could provide this diversity of molecules, in enough abundance to maintain human life. You are what you eat. Without a proper nutritional foundation in place, peak performance is not possible.

Building the proper foundation begins with providing the bulk of the raw materials necessary to create cellular machinery. These materials come in the form of macronutrients—lipids, proteins and carbohydrates.



Lipids:
Approximately 95% of all ingested lipids (fats) are in the form of triglycerides. Triglycerides are composed of 3 fatty acids bound to a glycerol backbone. When we eat lipids, the triglycerides are broken down into smaller components, namely free fatty acids and glycerol, which are easier to absorb. Once absorbed lipids may be transported throughout the body by lipoproteins.

Lipoproteins come in three major varieties, very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and high-density lipoprotein (HDL). VLDL and LDL transport fats (mainly triglycerides and cholesterol) from the liver to the body tissues. HDL on the other hand returns fats to the liver for storage. High levels of VLDL and LDL are associated with an increased risk of developing atherosclerosis, and consequently an increased risk of heart attack and stroke, while high HDL levels are associated with a decreased risk.

The roles of lipids in human physiology are widespread. Each and every cell in our body contains a membrane made up of a lipid bilayer. Membranes allow the body to compartmentalize resources, allowing for reactions to take place under optimized conditions. Without this function, life as we know it would not be possible. The many roles of lipids continue to emerge as science delves further into new fields of research. Much remains to be learned about one of the most abundant components of our being.

While optimal lipid intakes remain undetermined, one should strive to consume no more than 30% of total daily calories from lipids; however, a lack of certain fatty acids likely contributes significantly to the development of numerous chronic diseases, including heart disease, cancer and stroke. According to Michael Murray, ND., at the turn of the 20th century, the average American consumed approximately 125g of fat per day. Nowadays your typical American consumes 175g of fat per day, an increase of some 40%. But according to Murray, despite excessive consumption, Americans are actually consuming an insufficient amount of essential fatty acids, as indicated by dietary surveys.

This essential fatty acid deficiency he says, results from the consumption of over commercialized fats and refinement processes that result in a lack of dietary "good" omega-3 fatty acids and an increase in "bad" saturated fat and omega-6 fatty acids. To achieve optimal health, one must take into account both the quality and quantity of fat ingested.


Saturated vs. Unsaturated Fats

A fatty acid is termed saturated when all of the carbon molecules are bound to as many hydrogen atoms as possible--they are saturated with hydrogen. Unsaturated fatty acids therefore are those fatty acids that do not contain the maximum number of carbon-hydrogen bonds possible. Saturated fats are solid or semi-solid at room temperature, and are almost always animal fats like butter. Unsaturated fats on the other hand are usually liquid at room temperature, and are termed oils. The body can manufacture its own fats given enough caloric intake. There are some fatty acids essential for life, which the body cannot make--these fatty acids are termed the essential fatty acids, as it is essential to obtain them from dietary sources.

Two American scientists, Burr and Evans, first discovered essential fatty acids in 1923. It was found that rats fed a diet deficient in polyunsaturated fatty acids developed symptoms of illness. Evans having previously performed research on vitamin A termed these fatty acids vitamin F, as rats could not manufacture the polyunsaturated fatty acids endogenously, yet required them for survival. By 1930, Burr discovered that symptoms of linoleic acid deficiency could not be reversed by administration of alpha-linolenic acid, and that alpha-linolenic acid deficiency symptoms could not be reversed by the administration of linoleic acid. This showed that there was not one single compound vitamin F, but two distinct groups of essential fatty acids, and thus the term vitamin F was dropped in favor of a new form of classification based upon chemical structure.

It was found that all omega-3 fatty acids essential for proper health could be derived from alpha-linolenic acid and that all omega-6 fatty acids necessary for proper health could be derived from linoleic acid. To this date, these remain the only two known essential fatty acids in humans.

Surrounding every cell of the body is a membrane—a bilayer composed primarily of essential fatty acids. These essential fatty acids take the form of phospholipids. Phospholipids are similar to triglyceride except that one fatty acid of the triglyceride is replaced with a phosphorous containing molecule such as serine (as in phosphatidylserine) or choline (as in phosphatidylcholine). When present in different ratios, phospholipids affect the cell membrane by altering both membrane integrity and fluidity. The type of fat we consume in our diet directly impacts the composition of our cell membranes.

Since the fat we eat becomes incorporated into cell membranes in the form of phospholipids, the properties of the particular fatty acids we consumes directly impacts the properties of the membrane itself. While we can ingest phospholipids such as lecithin, phosphatidylcholine, etc. these molecules do not generally make it to the membrane intact, as they are first broken down into glycerol and free fatty acids, before being incorporated into membranes. This means that even with supplementation of phospholipids, dietary lipid intake will ultimately determine membrane composition.

The study of lipids in human health is fast becoming a hot topic. In the future, lipidomics will join genomics and proteomics in establishing the blueprints for proper health. (Cole MJ, Enke CG. 1991. Direct determination of phospholipid structures in microorganisms by fast atom bombardment triple quadrupole mass
spectrometry. Anal Chem 63:1032–1038.) While lipid profile testing is currently not readily available, it is likely a good idea for everyone to supplement good essential fatty acids, while reducing dietary intake of saturated fats and excessive omega-6 fatty acids.

The consensus in the scientific community is that cells are programmed in such a way as to selectively incorporate fatty acids into membranes as needed to maintain optimal function. However, since most diets are lacking in essential fatty acids, and over abundant in saturated fatty acids (in general, animal fats), the "bad" saturated fats compete with the "good" mono and polyunsaturated fats for membrane real estate. As a result cell membranes of those with a poor diet are much less fluid than they should be. Remember saturated fats are solid at room temperature!





Omega-3 to Omega-6 Ratio

In 1935 Ulf von Euler, the winner of the 1970 Nobel Prize in Medicine, isolated a set of 20 carbon fatty acids from the prostate gland which appeared to act like hormones. At the time it was believed that all hormones originated from a gland, and thus these new hormones were termed prostaglandins. We now know that prostaglandins do in fact act as hormones, but can be produced in every living cell of the body from omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids.

Omega-3 fatty acids help prevent platelets from sticking together, reducing inflammation while improving blood flow. Omega-6 fatty acids on the other hand promote platelet aggregation and lead to hardening of the arteries, resulting in heart disease and stroke. By consuming a proper ratio of omega-3 to omega-6 fatty acids, we can assist our bodies in controlling inflammation, while promoting membrane fluidity, enhancing cellular communication.

The optimum ration of omega-6 to omega-3 is believed to be 4:1. With recent increases in dietary fat consumption, it is typical for individuals to consume more than a 20:1 ratio. While supplementing more good omega-3 fat will help to improve this ratio, one must eliminate bad fat to maximize results.








Burr, G.O., Burr, M.M. and Miller, E. (1930). "On the nature and role of the fatty acids essential in nutrition" (PDF). J. Biol. Chem. 86 (587). Retrieved 2007-01-17.

Protein:

Our bodies are made of approximately 20% protein. Proteins are composed of many single units called amino acids that are linked together. Many proteins serve as enzymes, and make up much of the molecular machinery of our body. Enzymes lower the activation energy of a reaction, enhancing efficiency by acting as a catalyst. When a protein is digested, it is broken down into its amino acids components. Amino acids may be reassembled into new proteins as needed by the body, so long as there is adequate dietary protein intake.

Just as there are essential fatty acids, so too are there essential amino acids, in fact there are nine, but due to the abundance of dietary protein in the Western world, supplementation is almost always unnecessary. Protein should account for around 15% of total calories consumed and should be primarily from vegetarian sources (soy, lentils, whole grains) or lean meats (fish, poultry white meat).

Exercise has little impact on dietary protein requirements since only 2-10% of calories burned are from oxidation of amino acid residues. In intense resistance training depletion of branched chain amino acids may occur, so athletes are advised to consume 1.6g-protein/kg-body weight per day. Individuals consuming 15% of total calories from protein should already be consuming in excess of 100g per day.

The body can use amino acids from dietary proteins to synthesize new neurotransmitters as needed. There are two classes of neurotransmitters: small-molecule and neuropeptides. Small-molecule neurotransmitters are synthesized locally within the axon terminal of neurons, and include molecules such as serotonin. Neuropeptides are synthesized in the cell body by linking amino acids into a small peptide chains, usually between 3 and 36 amino acid residues in length, and include molecules such as the endogenous opioids, which serve as natural painkillers.

It is common for cognitive enhancement products to contain one or more amino acids to serve as precursors to various neurotransmitters, typically the monoamines. Monoamine neurotransmitters are known to produce desirable effects on mood, motivation, sleep, etc. making modification of pathways related to these neurotransmitters popular. Since dietary protein intake is usually more than adequate, amino acid supplements are often only mildly effective in increasing neurotransmitter concentration.







Carbohydrate:

Carbohydrates are an effective means for storing quickly accessible energy in the body. Dietary carbohydrate is broken down in the stomach by enzymes and hydrochloric acid into smaller sugars, which are easier to absorb, or passed through the body undigested. Once absorbed, simple sugars like glucose and fructose may travel to the liver for storage in the form of glycogen, or be converted into other useful materials such as amino acids and fatty acids.

“Complex” carbohydrates are made of single sugar units such as glucose linked together in long chains called polysaccharides. Since carbohydrates are broken down into smaller units before being absorbed, the effect a carbohydrate will have on the body is highly determinant on polypeptide composition. Consumption of the same quantity of different carbohydrates can produce drastically different rises in blood sugar. In order to rank carbohydrates based on physiological response, the glycemic index was established. The glycemic index of a food is typically determined by comparing the increase in blood sugar from consumption of 50g of a given carbohydrate to consumption of 50g of pure glucose, with glucose being assigned a score of 100.

In general, glycemic index increases with a corresponding increase in perceived carbohydrate sweetness. Carbohydrate sweetness is determined by the sugar monomers that make up the polysaccharide. Fructose is the sweetest of the common natural sugars, and is perceived to be 2.3x sweeter than glucose. While the individual sugars making up a polysaccharide are important in determining sweetness, length of the polysaccharide also comes into play. Polysaccharides tend to decrease in sweetness with increasing length. This is why longer carbohydrates, such as starches do not taste sweet, despite producing a significant rise in blood sugar. Glycemic index is also highly dependent on the fiber content of a given carbohydrate source, with increased fiber slowing the gastric emptying rate resulting in a lower glycemic response. For these reason, sweetness is not a reliable indicator of glycemic impact.

Low glycemic index foods include almost all fruits and vegetables, legumes, whole grains, and nuts. High glycemic index foods are typically contain highly refined grains and sugars, such as white bread and soft drinks. Avoid highly refined carbohydrates, in favor of natural fiber rich sources.

High quality dietary carbohydrate should account for 50-70% of total calorie intake. Carbohydrate needs should be met by consuming at least 5-9 servings of a variety of fruits and vegetables with additional carbohydrate from consumption of whole grains and legumes. Athletes should consume 7-12 grams of carbohydrate per kilogram during recovery from hard training session to facilitate glycogen synthesis.



Glucose vs. Fructose

With increased commercialization of food resources, enhancing palatability and visual appeal of products has become big business. While both glucose and fructose are natural monosaccharaides, fructose has the tendency to exist in an open chain form more often than glucose. This open chain configuration gives fructose the ability to cross-link with amino acids via the Maillard reaction, a process known as glycation.

In commercial baking, fructose is added to enhance browning. While good for visual appeal and palatability, the browning process itself is associated with the production of mutagenic chemicals. These chemicals, termed advanced glycation end products (AGEs), have been associated with increases in the prevalence of neurodegenerative diseases.

In addition to the formation of AGEs, the consumption of large amounts of fructose results in an increase in pattern B LDL (small dense LDL) the form most associated with elevated triglyceride levels and low HDL levels. Pattern B LDL has been shown to cause significantly increases in vascular disease. Consumption of large quantities of all sugars leads to lipid synthesis; however, the body utilizes various sugars in very different ways.

Glucose is the preferred fuel source of the body, and up to 80% of all glucose consumed is used by the organs for energy. Approximately 20% of glucose consumed is sent to the liver, where most will be stored as glycogen—only around 0.5% will be converted to VLDL. Fructose on the other hand is not as readily utilized, and results in a significant increase in VLDL and an increase in triglyceride levels of up to 30%. This means that a high fructose diet can actually be considered a high fat diet.

Acetyl-L-Carnitine


Carnitine is a vitamin like amino acid derivative, and is present in nearly all cells of the body. First isolated from meat extracts in 1905, carnitines role in human physiology remained unknown until 1952, when a group of researchers determined it to be a growth factor for the mealworm Tenebrio molitor. From this discovery, carnitine became known as vitamin Bt. This prompted researchers to reinvestigate the role of carnitine in humans, and soon after determined it to be essential in the breakdown of fats to produce energy. Carnitine is no longer considered a vitamin, as it is synthesized in the body, primarily the liver and kidneys, from the essential amino acids L-methionine and L-Lysine. The synthesis of carnitine requires the cofactors vitamin B6 (in the active form pyridoxal phosphate, PLP), niacin (vitamin B3, nicotinic acid), vitamin C and iron.

Carnitine is responsible for the transport of long-chain fatty acids, across the inner mitochondrial membrane, where they are released and used for β-oxidation (energy production, ATP). In addition, carnitine serves several other key physiological functions, including the conversion of keto-acid analogues of the branched chain amino acids. This function is vital during periods of starvation/fasting and exercise.

While carnitine is available in several forms, the acetyl-L-carnitine (ALCAR also called LAC) form is preferred for Alzheimer's disease and cognitive effects. Acetyl-L-carnitine shares great structural similarity to acetylcholine. This led researchers to investigate the role of carnitine in Alzheimer's disease. Calvani et. al. demonstrated in 1993, that acetyl-L-carnitine does in fact mimic acetylcholine, and is beneficial to both Alzheimer's patients and elderly patients with impaired memory or depression. It does so by enhancing energy production, stabilizing cell membranes and by mimicing or increasing acetylcholine function.

This finding prompted De Falco, et. al, to study the effects of carnitine on Down's syndrome, as both are characterized by cholinergic transmission deficits. Sure enough, patients demonstrated statistically significant improvements in attention and visual memory. For the treatment of Down's syndrome, a dosage of 10 milligrams per pound of body weight appears adequate.

Dosage: 1,500-4,000 mg/day in divided doses.

Interactions: Carnitine works synergystically with both pantethine and CoQ10. Daily choline supplementation assists in the conservation of carnitine, by lowering urinary carnitine excretion significantly (20mg choline/kg body weight).

Safety: Acetyl-L-carnitine exhibits no significant side effects.

_______________________________________________________

1. Bremer J, Carnitine--metabolism and function. Physiol Rev 63. 1420-1480, 1983.

2. Bamji MS, Nutritional and health implications of lysine carnitine relationship. Wld Rev Nutr Diet 44, 185-211, 1984.

3. Bowman B, Acetyl-carnitine and Alzheimer's disease. Nutrition Reviews 50, 142-144, 1992.

4. Calvani M, et al., Action of acetyl-L-carnitine in neurodegeneration and Alzheimer's disease. Ann NY Acad Sci 663, 483-486, 1993.

5. Carta A, et al., Acetyl-L-carnitine and Alzheimer's disease. Pharmacological considerations beyond the cholinergic sphere. Ann NY Acad Sci 695, 324-326, 1993.

6. Carter HE, et al., Chemical studies on vitamin BT isolation and characterization as carnitine. Arch Biochem Biophys 38, 405-416, 1952.

7. De Falco FA, et al., Effect of the chronic treatment with L-acetylcarnitine in Down's syndrom. Clin Ther 144, 123-127, 1994.

8. Daily JW III; Sachan DS, Choline supplementation alters carnitine homeostasis in humans and guinea pigs. J Nutr 125, 1938-1944, 1995.
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Flex
post Jun 11, 2013, 07:55 PM
Post #6


God
******

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 1954
Joined: Oct 17, 2006
From: Bay area CA
Member No.: 5877



I made diagrams of all of the synthesis pathways, but BrainMeta wont allow me to easily ad them...
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Flex
post Jun 11, 2013, 08:00 PM
Post #7


God
******

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 1954
Joined: Oct 17, 2006
From: Bay area CA
Member No.: 5877










User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Flex
post Jun 11, 2013, 08:17 PM
Post #8


God
******

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 1954
Joined: Oct 17, 2006
From: Bay area CA
Member No.: 5877



Just ignore that second one... I uploaded it by mistake smile.gif I will leave it for those of you who are way too into biochemistry for your own good.
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Bumblebee
post Jun 12, 2013, 02:50 AM
Post #9


Newbie
*

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 12
Joined: Jun 11, 2013
Member No.: 35168



Hey there,
Thank you for your replies, that is a lot of information.
I tried to make something of it, needed some coffee, tried again, needed more coffee and could not focus. So on the biggest part I will reply later on. This is exactly my problem, I cannot focus on things like this anymore.
I will however try the B50 and B12 supplements. It has been a long while, I used to take B3 and B12 for a while but I think it is about 4 years ago.
It cannot hurt to try, and I do remember now that they might be really helpful.

I will read a bit more on Agomelatine, before I ask. I could actually do it, because there is a psychiatrist for me, next to the psychologist. He decided though that he did not want to give me any medications, because he cannot see a big enough problem. Except for the focus/memory problem, he considered giving me Concerta. But he mentioned that he was not sure if I had ADD (its most certainly not ADHD). And I decided to look for other solutions, because I could not oversee the effects it would have on my brain.
I know that in a small percentage of people Concerta causes psychosis, because of too much dopamine (not sure if this is what it is but that is what I understood).
And knowing what my father has.. I really would not want to take this risk unless I know it is save for me and my brain. Maybe my brain is like his brain, but simply did not have anything to cause psychosis yet. He used marijuana when he was younger. Which might have been the kick-start of his problems.. not sure.
What if medications/drugs like that cause the problem?
I have seen what psychosis/schizophrenia does to a person, and do fear it a lot. So with serious medications I am very careful.

I did try melatonin a while ago, and it did calm me before sleep. But it also seems to cause a woozy feeling the next day. I am already woozy, so if I add to that it becomes terrible.
I do not know for sure though if it was caused by the melatonin, of if it was just a bad week. I can try again to see what happens.

(PS, I decided to try the facebook link, but it does not seem to work)
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Bumblebee
post Jun 12, 2013, 04:07 AM
Post #10


Newbie
*

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 12
Joined: Jun 11, 2013
Member No.: 35168



I just remembered that a couple of years ago, I went to a different doctor then my own a couple of times. He is also a homeopath, next to being a regular doctor.
He tested my blood and said there was not enough zinc in it, and vitamin d.
All my other vitamin/mineral levels where ok. I was a vegetarian at the time, and took a good multi vitamin, which included vitamin d and zinc. It was a bit strange that I did not have enough of those two.
I take both, but maybe my body does not absorb it properly.

I would go to that other doctor again if I could, but its too expensive.
My own doctor never noticed any shortages.
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Flex
post Jun 12, 2013, 07:23 AM
Post #11


God
******

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 1954
Joined: Oct 17, 2006
From: Bay area CA
Member No.: 5877



Congrats you just found the cause of your problem! I am 80% confident you are zinc deficient. As your doctor to measure the amount of zinc in your white blood cells (leukocyte zinc levels). Blood and hair tests are not reliable.

Average zinc consumption is between 47% and 67% of the recommended daily allowance. Check to see if your nails have any white spots. Zinc deficiency is associated with vegetarianism and protein deficiency. Your iron supplement may also be to blame. High dietary iron:zinc or calcium:zinc ratio can cause decreased zinc absorption. If you are on any kind of oral contraceptive you will almost certainly need to increase zinc intake.

Zinc is involved in more enzymatic reactions than any other mineral (over 200 different enzymes require zinc) and is required for hormone function including:

Thymic hormones
Insulin
Growth hormone
Sex hormones

Zinc from plant sources is less bioavailable due to the high fiber content. While fiber is good for lots of things such as binding to excess cholesterol, it also forms complexes with minerals like zinc, specifically it forms an insoluble zinc-phytate complex, but that is not important smile.gif

I suggest you try supplementing around 20-30mg of zinc a day. Take it with foods that are low in fiber and at a different time than you take your iron supplement (heads up: it might upset your stomach if you do not eat, same for the iron supplement). I would also try adding the B50 complex as well, as it will be beneficial regardless. I am willing to bet that the iron supplement is what was making you feel woozy in the morning, not the melatonin. I would give it another try at 3mg a night.


As far as facebook goes... I must have done something stupid to my privacy settings smile.gif If you send me a PM with a link to your profile I will add you.
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Bumblebee
post Jun 12, 2013, 07:27 AM
Post #12


Newbie
*

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 12
Joined: Jun 11, 2013
Member No.: 35168



Hey there again,
Just a small update.
I bought supplements etc (and spend half my budget for food for this month tongue.gif)
What I have now is:
-B12 sublingual
-B50
-L-tyrosine, because I do not eat cheese/milk products, it looked promising when I was reading about it,.. so lets try.
-Multi vitamins (a better one then I already had)
-omega 3, because I was running out of it
-And pro biotics + Gotu Kola.

We have a health shop here with a very good earthed homeopath, she is always open for questions.
I explained and she thought it might be helpful to try probiotics, and Gotu Kola. Since I had antibiotics a couple of months ago because of my appendicitis (and several times before).
She said that the gut bacteria have a lot to do with the health of the brain. I knew this already, and sometimes used pro biotics, which seem very helpful (but super expensive).
The Gotu Kola is new for me, she said it helps to sort of clean the brain of toxins caused by fungi in the body, and caused by other things.
When I started reading about it I decided to try.
I had already bought the B12 and the B50 somewhere else, I asked her about it and she thought they where a good idea as well.
I do not have a lot to spend so I hope some of it will help.
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Flex
post Jun 12, 2013, 07:42 AM
Post #13


God
******

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 1954
Joined: Oct 17, 2006
From: Bay area CA
Member No.: 5877



You may want to add additional zinc as most supplements are less than 10mg. Typical Americans consume 10mg per day from diet. Females ages 11+ need at least 12mg per day to avoid deficiency.

For you I would strive to get between 15-20mg additional each day. I suggested the 30mg as more of a therapeutic measure.
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Bumblebee
post Jun 12, 2013, 07:58 AM
Post #14


Newbie
*

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 12
Joined: Jun 11, 2013
Member No.: 35168



Hey there again Flex, sorry I did not notice your reply before I went out to buy things. So I did not read about the zinc yet.

Thanks for your enthusiasm in helping me smile.gif it is really appreciated a lot.
Ok lets see.
The zinc.. it could very well be, so I will add it. I checked my new multi vitamin tablets and there is 15 mg in it.
I also have old tablets with 15 mg zink in it, but they also contain magnesium, calcium and borium.
So I am not sure if I can add that to the multi vitamin tablets. Maybe it becomes a bit too much then (of the other ones).
I guess I will have to spend a little more on capsules that contain only zinc.
If I take the multi vitamins, I have a lower dose of iron, so that should be good.

So I will take the multi ones, buy one with only zinc to add to it, and leave the higher dose of iron alone.
I will still use the B12, B50, gotu kola, pro biotics and tyrosine. But with the tyrosine I will wait for a bit.
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Flex
post Jun 12, 2013, 09:23 PM
Post #15


God
******

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 1954
Joined: Oct 17, 2006
From: Bay area CA
Member No.: 5877



The zinc supplement you have is probably fine. Chances are you do not have anywhere close to enough calcium to compete. They also make zinc lozenges that are rather tasty smile.gif
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Bumblebee
post Jun 14, 2013, 06:43 AM
Post #16


Newbie
*

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 12
Joined: Jun 11, 2013
Member No.: 35168



I found a cheap zinc supplement that contains 10 mg, so together with the 15 from the multivitamins that should be enough and also safe. smile.gif
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post

Reply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 



Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 26th June 2017 - 07:45 AM


Home     |     About     |    Research     |    Forum     |    Feedback  


Copyright BrainMeta. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use  |  Last Modified Tue Jan 17 2006 12:39 am

Consciousness Expansion · Brain Mapping · Neural Circuits · Connectomics  ·  Neuroscience Forum  ·  Brain Maps Blog
 · Connectomics · Connectomics  ·  shawn mikula  ·  articles