BrainMeta'   Connectomics'  

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

 
Reply to this topicStart new topic
> Theory of love
coberst
post Dec 13, 2007, 04:20 AM
Post #1


Demi-God
*****

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 721
Joined: May 21, 2007
Member No.: 11167



Theory of love

Occasionally when reading I run across a phrase or sentence or paragraph, which really rings a bell for me. The bell may be recognition of the compatibility of the point to my own conclusions or perhaps the point caused an epiphany, or other reasons. When I encounter such a point I often copy it and store it in a file for later analysis. One such point is as follows: “Platonic idea that the giving and receiving of knowledge, the active formation of another’s character, or the more passive growth under another’s guidance, is the truest and strongest foundation of love”.

My analysis of this sentence led me down a long trail over an extended period of time to an understanding of the meaning of the statement and to an agreement with the meaning of that statement.

When studying philosophy I had read some of Plato’s work and had a slight remembrance of one of his Dialogues in which he dealt with the subject of love. After some study of the particular Dialogue in question and some further study of Plato’s general philosophy I realized what was meant by the point made in the sentence I had saved.

Plato wrote, “An unexamined life is not worth living”. I find this a bit hyperbolic but nevertheless agree with the general point. Plato also argued that the giving and receiving of knowledge, the active formation of another’s character, or the more passive growth under another’s guidance, is the truest and strongest foundation of love. Plato judged that the basis of love is centered upon the mutual struggle for truth.

I would not attempt to explain why Plato’s Idealistic philosophy leads to this conclusion but I think one can find justification for this point of view by considering the nature of the parent to progeny relationship. Considering the nature of evolution one might easily discover that the origin of love could be observed in the obvious relationship of present day mammals. The educational relationship between the animal mother and their progeny are evident to the most casual observer.

I often watch the Discovery Channel on TV. As you probably know this channel often has a great documentary on animal life. Their audio/visual presentations give the viewer wonderful insights into the life of animals. Often the animals in question are large mammals such as lions, gorillas, monkeys, etc. I find verification of Plato’s theory every time I see the relationship between mother and progeny in these documentaries.

Evolutionary Psychology is based on the theory that all human psychological traits, such as love, must be traceable to our evolutionary ancestors. The source of love in humans is evolved from the mother infant relationship in early mammals (perhaps).

I find this theory of love makes sense. Do you agree?

User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Rick
post Dec 13, 2007, 10:28 AM
Post #2


Supreme God
*******

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 5916
Joined: Jul 23, 2004
From: Sunny Southern California
Member No.: 3068



Sounds good to me. This is a case where I agree completely with Plato, although he was dead wrong about his idealism ontologically (I believe ideas have no proper existence in themselves, but must be represented by material structure).

Note that the process of graduation from an educational institution is called "matriculation" from an "alma mater" (latin root for mother).
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
coberst
post Dec 14, 2007, 12:53 AM
Post #3


Demi-God
*****

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 721
Joined: May 21, 2007
Member No.: 11167



Truth for a lion cub is what is the correct manner to deal with a snake, or an elephant, or etc. All of which the cub learns from the mother.

Love is an instinct without which mammals would not have survived.

We have all kinds of ways to use the word love. If we remove all the contingencies we will find that in all cases the essence of love is an emotion, i.e. an instinct.

I love chocolate, I love mom, and I love April in Paris. Love is an instinct and love is an abstract idea. Remove all the contingencies and you are left with the emotion we call love. That feeling resulting from the emotion is really what we are speaking of. We attach that feeling to many things. Just as we attach fear to many things and these emotions help the species to survive.

User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Lindsay
post Dec 14, 2007, 11:31 AM
Post #4


God
******

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 1730
Joined: Feb 07, 2006
From: Markham (Thornhill), part of the greater Toronto area, the GTA, just north of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Member No.: 4838



QUOTE(coberst @ Dec 14, 2007, 12:53 AM) *

...We have all kinds of ways to use the word love. If we remove all the contingencies we will find that in all cases the essence of love is an emotion, i.e. an instinct....
Coberst, are you thinking of eros, philia, or agape? Interestingly, Paul--the great apostle and framer of the policies of early Christianity--was the same one who wrote the famous words about Christian love in 1 Corinthians 13, which is a poem on love as a spiritual force.
http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=1+Corinthians+13

The New Testament Greek for 'love' is 'agape'. Modern Greeks, when they want to say, "I love you" still say, "Agapo". The 'o'--short for 'ego', used on the end of the word, serves the same function as our 'I'

Unlike 'eros'--sensual love, from which we get our word 'erotic'--and 'philia'--love of a friend, and from which we get 'philosophy', agape does not depend on how we feel, but on what we WILL to do for others. I like to say that it arises in our willings, not just in our feelings.

The following is from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agape
QUOTE
FROM WIKIPEDIA: Agapē (written αγάπη in the Greek alphabet, and pronounced /aga̍pe/ or /a̍gape/), is one of several Greek words meaning love. The word has been used in different ways by a variety of contemporary and ancient sources, including Biblical authors. Many have thought that this word represents divine, unconditional, self-sacrificing, active, volitional, thoughtful love. Greek philosophers at the time of Plato used it in a way that suggested love of that which is below you, rather than philia, love between friends or equals, and eros, love of that which is above you. Eros was seen as the lowest, and agape as the highest. The term was used by the early Christians to refer to the special love for God and God's love for humanity, as well as the self-sacrificing love they believed all should have for each other.

Agape can be defined as an intentional response to promote well-being when responding to that which has generated ill-being (Thomas Jay Oord). Agape, to use the Biblical phrase, returns evil with good. It is a prominent term in the works of C.S. Lewis.
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
coberst
post Dec 15, 2007, 01:07 AM
Post #5


Demi-God
*****

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 721
Joined: May 21, 2007
Member No.: 11167



Love is the instinct that has many meanings. I suspect that if we remove the contingencies of all these different meanings assigned to this word we will find the same basic instinct.

What are the emotions? The primary emotions are happiness, sadness, fear, anger, surprise and disgust. The secondary or social emotions are such things as pride, jealousy, embarrassment, and guilt. Damasio considers the background emotions are well-being or malaise, and calm or tension. The label of emotion has also been attached to drives and motivations and to states of pain and pleasure.

Antonio Damasio, Distinguished Professor and Head of the Department of Neurology at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, testifies in his book “The Feelings of What Happens” that the biological process of feelings begins with a ‘state of emotion’, which can be triggered unconsciously and is followed by ‘a state of feeling’, which can be presented nonconsciously; this nonconscious state can then become ‘a state of feeling made conscious’.

“Emotions are about the life of an organism, its body to be precise, and their role is to assist the organism in maintaining life…emotions are biologically determined processes, depending upon innately set brain devices, laid down by long evolutionary history…The devices that produce emotions…are part of a set of structures that both regulate and represent body states…All devices can be engaged automatically, without conscious deliberation…The variety of the emotional responses is responsible for profound changes in both the body landscape and the brain landscape. The collection of these changes constitutes the substrate for the neural patterns which eventually become feelings of emotion.”

The biological function of emotions is to produce an automatic action in certain situations and to regulate the internal processes so that the creature is able to support the action dictated by the situation. The biological purpose of emotions are clear, they are not a luxury but a necessity for survival.

“Emotions are inseparable from the idea of reward and punishment, pleasure or pain, of approach or withdrawal, of personal advantage or disadvantage. Inevitably, emotions are inseparable from the idea of good and evil.”

Emotions result from stimulation of the senses from outside the body sources and also from stimulations from remembered situations. Evolution has provided us with emotional responses from certain types of inducers put these innate responses are often modified by our culture.


User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Lindsay
post Dec 16, 2007, 02:01 PM
Post #6


God
******

Group: Basic Member
Posts: 1730
Joined: Feb 07, 2006
From: Markham (Thornhill), part of the greater Toronto area, the GTA, just north of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Member No.: 4838



Originally Posted By: samwik
... I was agape with shock, that my dictionary didn't even have the derivation of the word. I've never been so let down.
=========================
Sam and Coberst: My favourite--World Book Dictionary--points out that 'love' comes from 'lufu', Old English. In Middle English, it became 'leubh'.

You ask: "Anyone else out there have a more current dictionary?
When did this word develop that elaborate meaning?" Check out:
http://www.bartleby.com/61/24/L0262400.html

In any sermon in which I mentioned, agape--that is, love in the spiritual, non-sentimental sense of the term, I always told any listeners--that is, those who had not fallen asleep smile.gif

"When the Gospels tell us to love self, one's neighbour, and one another, including enemies, it is not telling us to feel passionately, or sexually, in love with same, or even to be close friends. Agape love simply means for us to practice the golden rule; be just, merciful and fair, in all circumstances. There is no role or place for false pride, for revenge, honour killings and the like, in agape/love. It is a special category. You must get what it really means, or risk not getting the real meaning of spiritual love."

"BTW", I said, "This kind of willing is as good for your physical and mental well being--it can even add healthy years to your life--as it is for that of others. It is the very foundation of real community. No wonder that John said that God and Love are one and the same."
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post

Reply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 



Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 20th July 2017 - 08:20 AM


Home     |     About     |    Research     |    Forum     |    Feedback  


Copyright BrainMeta. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use  |  Last Modified Tue Jan 17 2006 12:39 am

Consciousness Expansion · Brain Mapping · Neural Circuits · Connectomics  ·  Neuroscience Forum  ·  Brain Maps Blog
 · Connectomics · Connectomics  ·  shawn mikula  ·  articles