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> Schemas and Imitation?, Tracing the imitation signal through the brain
icake
post Sep 24, 2016, 10:09 AM
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Hello, I know this is likely a topic that is both too complex and maybe even not researched enough, but I was wondering if there might be at least some picture that's been established in regards to my question below. And I am a fair novice in this, so I am probably going to get many things wrong too.

I found two videos on cerebellum and the flow of information in the brain with great diagrams.
Youtube: Cerebellum by Armando Hasudungan
Youtube: Cerebellum by khanacademymedicine


First of all, am I right to conclude that cerebellum plays the major role in creating procedural memory, and in that process, the creation of schemas, which keep track of the incoming sensory patterns, and thus perform different schemas depending on these sensory inputs?

The next question is whether the memory is actually "saved" in the cerebellum? Because these videos are not including the hippocampus, but then again, is hippocampus and the surrounding regions only involved in declarative learning? (Here is hippocampus video I found that explains of information flow too):
Youtube: The Hippocampus and episodic memory by Brains Explained

Finally, the main question that I am hoping to get some insight into is in regards to the ability to imitate. Is there good research and understanding of the actual way the process of imitation includes other brain parts and how they tie into the cerebellum diagrams that were shown in the two cerebellum videos above?

For example, which parts of the brain would be involved in tracking the "sensory input patterns" and "understanding" that the movement of someone's right hand that was just observed is connected to one's own right hand?

I know that mirror neurons fire in this process as well, and I know that they are more correlated rather implicated in causing imitation.

I'd appreciate any feedback! Many thanks
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haohao
post Sep 25, 2016, 03:45 AM
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I'm not a Professor, and hope I could provide some suggestive opinions.

1. The schema referred here actually might be changed into a interacted brain-controlled framework as a conception. The mind framework of brain functioning framework contains the schema or pictures by our brains, and the contrast work is processing simultaneously. As for the imitation, in my opinion, is actually interacted information transmission, such as object transmission signal, contrasting signal and brain-centered searching signals. However, I'm not mean to change the stated notions and hope to improve them. In addition, a video website is proved here again to be a good tool for the academic research.

2. For your questions, 1) Probably not right. For creating the procedural signaling subsystem, including the related memory, the prefrontal mass and cerebellum together, and the cerebellum is mainly the supporting role in this situation. In my view, the cerebellum might mainly be responsible for the usual procedures or non-timely-new-created procedures. Because when meeting difficult questions, people usually feel unfit feeling from the foreheads. 2) It might be not stored in the cerebellum. However, the dispatching of the non-timely-new-created procedural memory may be led by the cerebellum. 3) Imitation stated here or imiis a kind of contrasting performance. The neuron mirror, which is indicated in the above post as "mirror neurons", is the reaction of the contrasting-related neuro-signaling transmission. Without contrasting performance of the brain functioning with memory activities involved, the imitation could not happen. In addition, the contrasting performance and signaling analysis is the main activities involved.

3. The ability to do contrasting performance is the core of our cognition.
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icake
post Sep 25, 2016, 12:56 PM
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Thanks for your response haohao and taking the time to address all of my questions.

I would love to learn more about "contrasting performance". I tried googling it and couldn't find specific information on it. Is this the official terminology for the brain process?

Also, I got curious about the "non-timely" processes in the brain but couldn't find specific information about it. Is that also an official term?

Many thanks again! smile.gif
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