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> 7 Ways to Upregulate Neurogenesis
brainprotips
post May 01, 2015, 11:58 AM
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Thought you guys might find this interesting:

"While the functional significance of neurogenesis in the adult human hippocampus is hotly debated, multiple lines of evidence suggest a pivotal role for neurogenesis in neuroplasticity and resilience to depression.

Kirsty L. Spalding et al developed a clever technique to estimate the generation of nascent neurons in adult humans by measuring the concentration of nuclear bomb test-derived carbon-14 in genomic DNA. Only newborn neurons will contain DNA with carbon-14 because the population used in the study had fully developed brains with terminally differentiated neurons at the time of the bomb test.

Supposing that neurogenesis was insignificant in the adult human brain, we would expect to find no neural DNA with the C-14 isotope. (Spalding’s group was able to exclude from their analysis non-neuronal cells in the central nervous system (CNS), consisting of astrocytes, microglia and oligodendrocytes; these cell types are not terminally differentiated and are capable of cell-division. )

Spalding’s findings? 700 new neurons are added every day, corresponding to an annual turnover of 1.75% of the neurons in the renewing fraction...."

source: brainprotips [dot] com
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