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> Neuroplasticity in Less Intelligent Animals vs Humans, Has there been a rigorous analysis regarding this?
AaronK
post Jul 23, 2016, 07:22 PM
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Basically, I wanted to know if anyone here could direct me to where I might find more about this question. I know that humans demonstrate fairly robust neuroplasticity, but do other animals do the same? If not all/most other animals, then which ones? Why those animals--is there something explanatory and clear to delineate them from others to explain this phenomenon (if true)?

There are obviously a myriad factors to account for human dominance over the planet, not just intelligence but physical maneuverability/dexterity, favorable social conditions which are phenomenon unto themselves, and more. However, I think the highly plastic nature of the brain is an interesting variable to consider when thinking about the differences in intelligence among humans vs. other species.

Any websites/research papers/individuals that I should look into in consideration of the differences in neuroplasticity between humans and other species?

Thanks!
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haohao
post Jul 25, 2016, 12:38 AM
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I'm not a Professor, and hope I could offer some helpful opinions.

1.Actually, I thought that the human brains show a highest-level synthetical neuroconnectivity, and the process of this progress perhaps the longest compared with the other animals, according to the periods needed for the growth of the brains.
2.As for the difference of the neuroplasticity, maybe you need to start your research first into the area of neurocell development. It also could be a key factor for the real brain map. The research stated above might own litttle possibilities to apply for the USA NIH funding, so you could use Internet to search the growth of the neurons and design a software for the comparsasion, such as a APP.
3.For the variable that might be most important, as far as I could see, it's the neuroconnectivity, including the functional zones and area centers. Because when we deals with the realities, our brain acitivities involve more areas together.
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GodConsciousness
post Jul 26, 2016, 04:52 PM
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Shawn Mikula is probably best prepared to field this question. His work on the brain maps of mice is likely to shed some light on this matter. While I cannot presume to answer for him, my own thoughts tend to suggest that neuroplasticity is prevalent throughout the evolutionary dynamics of all biological life involving neuronal development.
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haohao
post Jul 26, 2016, 10:13 PM
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I'm not a Professor, and hope I could offer some helpful opinions.

1.For the academic researching, thinking system, which inlcudes information searching, is the key to researching problems.
2.For the researching, try to think from a systemic perspective as best as possible is important.
3.Neuroplasticity is happened as one important phenomenon. However, as for the neuroconnectivity, the plasticity of the neurosystem is mainly based on the signaling subsystem.
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